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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    Just to answer Neewbie_noob - is fear mé and I'm not a native speaker and not even Irish, but thanks anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine
    Registered User


    _LilyRose_ wrote: »
    Conas a deirim 'a perfect recipe for tragedy' as Gaeilge más é do thoil é? Tá 'measc foirfe do thragóid' scríofa síos agam, ach nílim cinnte- tá fhois agam go bhfuil sé mícheart!
    Brón orm do mo Ghaeilge...

    Bealach mín na tubaiste.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    I've just been asking about bainisteoir and bainis - yes you're on the right track there - bainisteoir was someone who was capable of organising a party or ball and having to organise one where you had to bring two families together who weren't necessarily on good terms with each other couldn't have been easy - there was certainly a high degree of knowing how to manage people that was needed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,082 Feathers
    Registered User


    franc 91 wrote: »
    I've just been asking about bainisteoir and bainis - yes you're on the right track there - bainisteoir was someone who was capable of organising a party or ball and having to organise one where you had to bring two families together who weren't necessarily on good terms with each other couldn't have been easy - there was certainly a high degree of knowing how to manage people that was needed.

    Cool, thanks for the info. Interesting to hear about the etymology of Irish words & nice to know that I'm starting to spot patterns in how the words are formed. Slowly making some progress :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,290 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    What would the word for Arrivals be in Irish? I briefly saw it on the news today when talking about an airport - it was in 2 words.

    Also, the Irish for Departure Gates?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    If you look at Focal.ie, it's all there
    departure gate - geata imeachta
    departure hall - halla imeachta
    departure lounge - tolglann imeachta
    departures - eitilti (with a fada on that last 'i') amach
    arrivals - eitilti (with a fada on the last 'i') isteach
    arrivals hall - halla teachta - srl :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ An Sionnach Glic
    Registered User


    franc 91 wrote: »
    If you look at Focal.ie, it's all there
    departure gate - geata imeachta
    departure hall - halla imeachta
    departure lounge - tolglann imeachta
    departures - eitilti (with a fada on that last 'i') amach
    arrivals - eitilti (with a fada on the last 'i') isteach
    arrivals hall - halla teachta - srl :)

    Yes, focal.ie is your only man for modern terminology in Irish.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,401 Seanchai


    Rachel English or Áine Lawlor on Morning Ireland on Monday after the All-Ireland: "you sang an auld camaile(sp)"

    How do you spell "camaile" in English and Irish?


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach
    Registered User


    Seanchai wrote: »
    ...
    How do you spell "camaile" in English and Irish?
    It's not an Irish word; it's Hiberno-English, derived from "Come, all you ... " which is the opening of many popular ballads. I'd spell it as you did: camaile.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,285 An Coilean


    It's not an Irish word; it's Hiberno-English, derived from "Come, all you ... " which is the opening of many popular ballads. I'd spell it as you did: camaile.

    Surely its come-all-ye :confused:


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,969 my my my


    can anybody explain "faduda",(spelling?)

    i hear it from donegal irish and it translates to about.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    my my my wrote: »
    can anybody explain "faduda",(spelling?)

    i hear it from donegal irish and it translates to about.
    Donegal Irish is not my speciality, but can you be more specific? About meaning roughly? About specifying a place?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,969 my my my


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Donegal Irish is not my speciality, but can you be more specific? About meaning roughly? About specifying a place?

    what will we do about it= what will we do faduda?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    my my my wrote: »
    Gumbi wrote: »
    Donegal Irish is not my speciality, but can you be more specific? About meaning roughly? About specifying a place?

    what will we do about it= what will we do faduda?
    Now you have it meaning "about it". I don't have answer.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader
    Registered User


    my my my wrote: »
    can anybody explain "faduda",(spelling?)

    i hear it from donegal irish and it translates to about.

    its spelt - fá dtaobh de, just another way to say faoi

    fá, fé, faoi are all the same


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭ deirdremf
    Registered User


    Feathers wrote: »
    I learned the word bainis for wedding yesterday & the first thing I could think of was bainisteoir :D

    Any link between these two, or just me thinking in English? (Know it's not 100% on topic, but didn't think it warranted a thread of its own.)
    franc 91 wrote: »
    I've just been asking about bainisteoir and bainis - yes you're on the right track there - bainisteoir was someone who was capable of organising a party or ball and having to organise one where you had to bring two families together who weren't necessarily on good terms with each other couldn't have been easy - there was certainly a high degree of knowing how to manage people that was needed.
    I'd have my doubhts about that interpretation.
    To the best of my knowledge, bainisteoir is a gaelicised version of "manager"
    Stick an urú on the beginning of "bainisteoir" and you get "mbainisteoir" -> /manishter/; the G sound in english words very often becomes "sht" in Irish. So to me, this is by far the most likely derivation of the word.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20 ✭✭✭ GoldenPoppy
    Registered User


    Does anyone know how to translate the following proverb into Irish:
    "We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children"
    Thanks :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,290 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    The proper way to say these in Irish?
    Vote No
    Vote Yes
    = Vótáil Tá?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ An Sionnach Glic
    Registered User


    Worztron wrote: »
    The proper way to say these in Irish?
    Vote No
    Vote Yes
    = Vótáil Tá?

    It all depends on the question!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,290 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    It all depends on the question!

    For example, it is on the voting posters sometimes.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    Worztron wrote: »

    For example, it is on the voting posters sometimes.
    And typically incorrectly :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach
    Registered User


    Gumbi wrote: »
    And typically incorrectly :)
    I can't conveniently find the question for the upcoming referendum, but I think that you will find that and Níl are not used incorrectly. The question is usually of the form An bhfuil tú sásta ...?

    Contrived: yes; inelegant: yes; incorrect: I don't think so.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    I can't conveniently find the question for the upcoming referendum, but I think that you will find that and Níl are not used incorrectly. The question is usually of the form An bhfuil tú sásta ...?

    Contrived: yes; inelegant: yes; incorrect: I don't think so.
    I agree. I mis-worded. Illogically and inelegantly I meant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,290 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Is Vóta Aon correct as Vote No?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    Worztron wrote: »
    Is Vóta Aon correct as Vote No?
    No...that doesn't actually make sense actually. It looks like a much-garbled version of no vote.


  • Registered Users Posts: 866 Palytoxin
    Registered User


    What would the irish for the phrase "Take me home" be?


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Palytoxin wrote: »
    What would the irish for the phrase "Take me home" be?

    "Tóg abhaile mé" if you're saying it to an individual.
    "Tógaigí abhaile mé" if you're speaking to more than one person.

    Could be changed slightly depending on the context.


  • Registered Users Posts: 866 Palytoxin
    Registered User


    "Tóg abhaile mé" if you're saying it to an individual.
    "Tógaigí abhaile mé" if you're speaking to more than one person.

    Could be changed slightly depending on the context.
    Thanks, could you say "Tabhair dom abhaile" either?


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Palytoxin wrote: »
    Thanks, could you say "Tabhair dom abhaile" either?

    Nope. "Tabhair dom ___" means "Give me ____".

    "Tabhair abhaile mé" could work.

    It depends on whether you want to be brought home and left there, or taken home and staying in the company of whoever is taking you. ;)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 375 ✭✭ lucianot
    Registered User


    Hello, I hope somebody can help me.
    I want to name a guitar that I've built and I am considering these words 'yellow ash tree' meaning made of yellow ash tree and also 'the yellow one'.
    Or just get the spelling of the brand Fender into Irish.

    Thanks.


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