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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    Gumbi wrote: »
    In standard Irish, t doesn't get the d like that ( yeah, my terminology sucks! Haha). It's still used in Munster, though. Don't forget the fada on the o.
    I hadn't even thought about the rules, and I agree that the rules don't require the urú. But my idiosyncratic feel for the language makes me put it there.

    The missing fada was simply a lapse in attention.
    Is binn í Gaeilge na Mumhan :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach
    Registered User


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Is binn í Gaeilge na Mumhan :)
    Ní Gaolainn atá agam, ach Gaeilge.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,286 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Is Oscailte the Irish for both open and opening?

    How would I pronounce these properly?
    Oscailte
    Oscailt (just means opening right?)

    e.g. open source - foinse oscailte

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader
    Registered User


    Worztron wrote: »
    Is Oscailte the Irish for both open and opening?

    How would I pronounce these properly?
    Oscailte
    Oscailt (just means opening right?)

    e.g. open source - foinse oscailte

    Oscailte is an adjective, it means opened

    it is also the genitive of the noun oscailt


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,286 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Crosáidí wrote: »
    Oscailte is an adjective, it means opened

    it is also the genitive of the noun oscailt

    How should I pronounce these?
    Oscailte
    Oscailt

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Worztron wrote: »
    How should I pronounce these?
    Oscailte
    Oscailt

    Us-kill-teh
    Usk-ilt


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi
    Registered User


    Crosáidí wrote: »
    Oscailte is an adjective, it means opened

    it is also the genitive of the noun oscailt

    Also, the past participle of "open" right?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,286 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Also, the past participle of "open" right?

    It also means 'Forthright'.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Worztron wrote: »
    It also means 'Forthright'.

    Does anybody even use that word in English any more? :confused:

    It could be argued that oscailte means "open" in the same sense as direct/to the point, but it'd be an old dictionary that would give you that definition.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 873 InKonspikuou2


    I've a Canadian friend that emailed me asking if I could help him with translating the following phrase/expression into gaeilge.

    "laughter cures the soul".

    Or for example, "laughter heals the soul", "laughter can heal the soul" etc. However close the translation can be in gaeilge. Thanks very much in advance.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine
    Registered User


    Corraíonn an gáire an t-anam.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,677 deise go deo


    Whats the Irish for procrastinating?

    I have an exam tomorrow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine
    Registered User


    Ag moilleadóireacht


  • Registered Users Posts: 51 ✭✭✭ Aimsigh
    Registered User


    Can some one help me with this,

    I am looking for a translation for 'Where's the Irish?'

    I am stuck between 'Cá bhfuil an Gaeilge', and 'Cá bhfuil an Ghaeilge'





    *Really need to brush up on my grammar*


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    an Ghaeilge (Gaeilge is feminine)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ music888
    Registered User


    Aimsigh wrote: »
    Can some one help me with this,

    I am looking for a translation for 'Where's the Irish?'

    I am stuck between 'Cá bhfuil an Gaeilge', and 'Cá bhfuil an Ghaeilge'





    *Really need to brush up on my grammar*

    It's the 2nd 1! 'Gaeilge' is feminine so when you put 'an' in front of it it takes a 'h'; an Ghaeilge.


  • Registered Users Posts: 51 ✭✭✭ Aimsigh
    Registered User


    Go raibh maith agaibh Franc 91 agus Music888:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader
    Registered User


    Aimsigh wrote: »
    Can some one help me with this,

    I am looking for a translation for 'Where's the Irish?'

    I am stuck between 'Cá bhfuil an Gaeilge', and 'Cá bhfuil an Ghaeilge'





    *Really need to brush up on my grammar*

    All languages are feminine except English (Béarla)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 92 ✭✭✭ MaryKirwan


    I'm compiling lists of vocabulary and organizing them according to topic. Is "vocabulary on"
    "foclóir faoi"?


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    I'd go with "foclóir i leith" and then put the next word in the Tuiseal Ginideach.
    Wait for other suggestions though. :)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,005 Enkidu
    Registered User


    For eighty children we had earlier:
    "Ochtó páiste."
    You write/speak a dialect that still uses genitive plurals after multiples of ten, that's pretty cool. (or maybe the standard still does it).


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 92 ✭✭✭ MaryKirwan


    cad is "tíosmhéid"? Nach bhfuil sé san fhoclóir. An comhthéacs: "leagtar síos sa siollabas an tíosmhéid teanga atá riachtanach chun go mbeidh..."


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,624 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    MaryKirwan wrote: »
    cad is "tíosmhéid"? Nach bhfuil sé san fhoclóir. An comhthéacs: "leagtar síos sa siollabas an tíosmhéid teanga atá riachtanach chun go mbeidh..."

    Scríobhfainn é mar "an t-íosmhéid". Minimum atá i gceist.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,286 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    How would I say "Please can I go to the toilet?" in Irish?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    An bhfuil cead agam dul amach go dti (with a fada on the 'i') an leithreas màs é do thoil é?
    or -
    An bhfuil cead agam ghabhàil chun an leithris, le do thoil? (Ulster)
    or - 'bhfuil cead 'am a ghabhàil amach? (Conamara)
    or - 'bhfuil cead 'am a ghabhàil chuig teach an asail?
    (suggestions)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    I just wanted to add (hoping that it won't be judged too off-topic, he says) that there's a little bilingual book written by Gabriel Fitzmaurice called 'Do Teachers go to the Toilet?/An dTéann Mùinteori go Tigh an Asail?' published by Mercier.ie if you like bilingual toilet humour.


  • Registered Users Posts: 211 ✭✭ _LilyRose_
    Registered User


    Conas a deirim 'a perfect recipe for tragedy' as Gaeilge más é do thoil é? Tá 'measc foirfe do thragóid' scríofa síos agam, ach nílim cinnte- tá fhois agam go bhfuil sé mícheart!
    Brón orm do mo Ghaeilge...


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 543 Neewbie_noob
    Banned


    Worztron wrote: »
    What does this mean? Uibh Fhaili abú!

    G'wan Offaly or something like that.

    Uibh Fhaili = Offally

    abú = g'wan or something like that.

    You might get more accurate answers in teach na nGealt


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 543 Neewbie_noob
    Banned


    franc 91 wrote: »
    an Ghaeilge (Gaeilge is feminine)

    +1000

    someone give this lady /gent a medal :D
    Great to see a good command of "ár dteanga dhúchais".


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,082 Feathers
    Registered User


    I learned the word bainis for wedding yesterday & the first thing I could think of was bainisteoir :D

    Any link between these two, or just me thinking in English? (Know it's not 100% on topic, but didn't think it warranted a thread of its own.)


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