Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Hello All, This is just a friendly reminder to read the Forum Charter where you wish to post before posting in it. :)

The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

1679111214

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    What is the Irish for 'screenplay'?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Azebra wrote: »
    Howdy,

    Can anyone offer some translations for

    So many of my smiles begin with you


    Go raibh mhaith agaif (sp! Sory!)

    Literally: Is iomaí meangadh a thosnaíonn leat

    Perhaps there's a more eloquent way to phrase it, wait for more input, confirmation or otherwise.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,285 ✭✭✭ An Coilean


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Literally: Is ionann meangadh a thosnaíonn leat

    Perhaps there's a more eloquent way to phrase it, wait for more input, confirmation or otherwise.


    Should that not be 'iomaí'?


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,634 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    An Coilean wrote: »
    Should that not be 'iomaí'?

    I was just going to say the same thing. Probably a Freudian slip! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Indeed it should. Fixed. Thanks.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Worztron wrote: »
    What is the Irish for 'screenplay'?

    Would the closest thing be scríbhinn (script)?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 634 ✭✭✭ Míshásta


    Worztron wrote: »
    What is the Irish for 'screenplay'?

    "Script scannáin"

    http://www.focal.ie/Search.aspx?term=screenplay


  • Registered Users Posts: 634 ✭✭✭ Míshásta


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Literally: Is iomaí meangadh a thosnaíonn leat

    Perhaps there's a more eloquent way to phrase it, wait for more input, confirmation or otherwise.

    Perhaps:

    "Is tusa a spreagann an iomad sin miongháire ionam"

    Not word for word but maybe it carries the sentiment - if correct :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,625 ✭✭✭ How so Joe


    Was browsing tumblr a while ago and saw someone who said their tattoo was
    'Love life' as gaeilge.

    How would you translate that?
    The tattoo said "shaol ghrá", which is also what google translate says, but it just sounds wrong to me?
    Any better translations out there?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    How so Joe wrote: »
    Was browsing tumblr a while ago and saw someone who said their tattoo was
    'Love life' as gaeilge.

    How would you translate that?
    The tattoo said "shaol ghrá", which is also what google translate says, but it just sounds wrong to me?
    Any better translations out there?

    Hahaha. It means nothing. Totally wrong. Idiots using GT. Literally senseless.

    It's difficult to translate that succinctly into Irish, but a typical way to say it would be "Bain sult as an saol" reap pleasure from life. (Assuming you're saying it to one person, as opposed to multiple persons).


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,625 ✭✭✭ How so Joe


    Gumbi wrote: »
    Hahaha. It means nothing. Totally wrong. Idiots using GT. Literally senseless.

    It's difficult to translate that succinctly into Irish, but a typical way to say it would be "Bain sult as an saol" reap pleasure from life. (Assuming you're saying it to one person, as opposed to multiple persons).
    I was thinking along the same lines, I knew it sounded stupid.
    Thanks for your response. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ An Sionnach Glic


    How so Joe wrote: »
    Was browsing tumblr a while ago and saw someone who said their tattoo was
    'Love life' as gaeilge.

    How would you translate that?
    The tattoo said "shaol ghrá", which is also what google translate says, but it just sounds wrong to me?
    Any better translations out there?

    Aw please tell us you have a link to the photo!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    How so Joe wrote: »
    I was thinking along the same lines, I knew it sounded stupid.
    Thanks for your response. :)

    Another good one is "Bain ceol as an saol". Reap music [pleasure] from life.


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Azebra wrote: »
    Howdy,

    Can anyone offer some translations for

    So many of my smiles begin with you


    Go raibh mhaith agaif (sp! Sory!)


    Leatsa a thosaíonn cuid mhaith m'aoibhnis

    or

    Leatsa a thosaíonn cuid mhaith mo gháire


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Samantha4 wrote: »
    Leatsa a thosaíonn cuid mhaith m'aoibhnis

    or

    Leatsa a thosaíonn cuid mhaith mo gháire

    You're missing "is" at the start of both of those.


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Gumbi wrote: »
    You're missing "is" at the start of both of those.

    Both are correct. It's correct to start it without the copula, and correct to start it with it, the difference is in emphasis and linguistic register. 'Is leatsa' places greater emphasis on the fact that 'you', 2nd person sing, is the reason for the state of happiness. Re. register, if it's a formal context, 'is leatsa' would probably be better, and if more informal (as in, between two loved ones) than I would opt for 'leatsa.'


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Samantha4 wrote: »
    Both are correct. It's correct to start it without the copula, and correct to start it with it, the difference is in emphasis and linguistic register. 'Is leatsa' places greater emphasis on the fact that 'you', 2nd person sing, is the reason for the state of happiness. Re. register, if it's a formal context, 'is leatsa' would probably be better, and if more informal (as in, between two loved ones) than I would opt for 'leatsa.'


    hi Gumbi, I couldn't find your comment on 'Leatsa' perhaps being too informal for writing. No, it wouldn't be too informal for the written word if between friends/ lovers. The formality or otherwise would depend more on the linguistic register (and context) than on the fact that it might be orally transmitted, or transmitted in written form. In this instance, it also comes down to something highly individual: the style of the writer, and how he/she wishes to communicate the message. In other words, if the writer wishes to say 'Is leatsa', that's partly down to style, as is the choice of 'leatsa'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Gumbi wrote: »
    You're missing "is" at the start of both of those.


    Just struck me there that I forgot to mention that what makes it correct to start the sentence with 'leatsa' (as well as, as gumbi pointed out, is leatsa) is the fact that Foirm na Treise has been used (the Emphatic Form): it's the -sa at the end of the prepositional pronoun that allows us to start a sentence in Irish using just that prep.pronoun. For example, it would be incorrect of me to say 'Leat a thosaíonn...' etc
    There are numerous examples in Irish den fhoirm seo at the beginning of the Sentence: Ormsa atá an locht; Liomsa é sin; and there are other cases, too, where we leave 'is' out.
    Slán go fóillín, a chairde. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Samantha4 wrote: »
    Just struck me there that I forgot to mention that what makes it correct to start the sentence with 'leatsa' (as well as, as gumbi pointed out, is leatsa) is the fact that Foirm na Treise has been used (the Emphatic Form): it's the -sa at the end of the prepositional pronoun that allows us to start a sentence in Irish using just that prep.pronoun. For example, it would be incorrect of me to say 'Leat a thosaíonn...' etc
    There are numerous examples in Irish den fhoirm seo at the beginning of the Sentence: Ormsa atá an locht; Liomsa é sin; and there are other cases, too, where we leave 'is' out.
    Slán go fóillín, a chairde. :)

    Very good explanation. Your explanation regarding which part is being emphasised with regard to "is" (or lack thereof) is very clear - and correct.

    My bad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    I came across this but it may be wrong. I take skive to mean 'avoid doing something'. Is this translation correct?

    skive ~ bheith ag stangaireacht

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Worztron wrote: »
    I came across this but it may be wrong. I take skive to mean 'avoid doing something'. Is this translation correct?

    skive ~ bheith ag stangaireacht

    hi Worztron. Yes, stangaireacht can mean one of several things based on the context/how the sentence is qualified, but you're right, it generally means just evading something, or skiving off, or shirking responsibility, if it's used in the unqualified way that it is here. [It can also mean someone who is 'high maintenance' and has a tendency to be difficult/argumentative].
    :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ daithi_dearg


    Any idea what Seachai is in relation to a football match?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6 seomise


    there is no search word in irish, u may have misheard it.
    seachan means watch out or be careful or avoid
    seachas means except
    Hope that helps


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ daithi_dearg


    seomise wrote: »
    there is no search word in irish, u may have misheard it.
    seachan means watch out or be careful or avoid
    seachas means except
    Hope that helps

    The i has a fada but that's definitely the spelling as I have it on the screen in front of me on tg4. From the stats I'm thinking it may mean wide but not sure of that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6 seomise


    something along the lines of seachaí sé?
    He will avoid


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,634 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    Any idea what Seachai is in relation to a football match?

    A little bit of searching suggests to me that the word is being used to mean "passes".


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Any idea what Seachai is in relation to a football match?

    I'm no football expert! :) I'm into bikes! But I think it means the one who passes/ed the ball, as some of the other people on this page pointed out. It probably comes from the verb seachadadh, to pass. I would have thought it would be 'seachadóir.' Then again, it could be a dialect of that word. It's very possible that the word has been made up by An Coiste Téarmaíochta/The Terminology Commission. There's people sitting on this Committee that 'make up' words in Irish that often don't use Irish syntax. Another one they have made up is 'ciontóirí' i.e. the offenders. You can see this now on Dublin bus electronic notices. I read this just other day, as I sat on the bus passing Foras na Gaeilge, homestead of ILT (the Irish Language Taliban) :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Samantha4


    Samantha4 wrote: »
    Another one they have made up is 'ciontóirí' i.e. the offenders. You can see this now on Dublin bus electronic notices.

    I stand corrected! So here I am replying to myself. Ciontóir is actually in the Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, although I stand over what I say in that it's a term that is not used much to describe 'offenders.' Still, it's there, and that's the main thing. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 128 ✭✭ daithi_dearg


    These totalled 10 for each team and passes were listed seperately. My best guess is still wide but I might ask tg4 directly.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    I saw those stats recently on TG4 and took it to mean 'wides' as well.


Advertisement