Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Hello All, This is just a friendly reminder to read the Forum Charter where you wish to post before posting in it. :)

The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

1568101114

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 ✭✭✭ Krusader


    lucianot wrote: »
    Hello, I hope somebody can help me.
    I want to name a guitar that I've built and I am considering these words 'yellow ash tree' meaning made of yellow ash tree and also 'the yellow one'.
    Or just get the spelling of the brand Fender into Irish.

    Thanks.

    fuinnseog bhuí - yellow ash tree
    an ceann buí - the yellow one


  • Registered Users Posts: 375 ✭✭ lucianot


    Crosáidí wrote: »
    fuinnseog bhuí - yellow ash tree
    an ceann buí - the yellow one

    Many thanks!


  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ An Sionnach Glic


    Crosáidí wrote: »
    fuinnseog bhuí - yellow ash tree

    Fuinseog bhuí - spelt with just one 'n'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi



    Fuinseog bhuí - spelt with just one 'n'.
    This.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23 64478339


    Dia diobh a chairde,

    Bron orm ach nil mo chuid gaeilge go maith.
    Táim ag lórg an phrása as gaeilge 'it's a great day to be alive'.

    Bhí mé ag cuardach ar an idirlíon ach níl sé ann. Chuala mé micheál ó muircheartaigh rá é roimh.

    Níl mé ag lorg an t-aistriúchán litriúil.

    Míle buíochas!


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    "Is maith an lá é a bheith beo" would be a direct translation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Palytoxin wrote: »
    Thanks, could you say "Tabhair dom abhaile" either?

    You could say "Tabhair síob abhaile dom"... I think!


  • Registered Users Posts: 134 ✭✭ An Sionnach Glic


    Palytoxin wrote: »
    What would the irish for the phrase "Take me home" be?

    Tabhair abhaile mé.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Cliste wrote: »

    You could say "Tabhair síob abhaile dom"... I think!
    That's fine, though síob is typically used in the context of a lift, so it mightn't always be suitable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Gumbi wrote: »
    That's fine, though síob is typically used in the context of a lift, so it mightn't always be suitable.

    Very true, thought it was implied by the context :o


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    How would I say "their"?

    Are these word right?
    Athem
    Iad

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Needs context really

    For "I like their car" I would say

    "Is maith liom a gluaistéain"

    And for "It is their computer" I would say

    "is leo an ríomhaire"

    But wait for the true grammar types to give you the specifics!


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,634 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Worztron wrote: »
    Are these word right?
    Athem

    I've never seen that word before. Where did you find it? Old Irish or Scots Gaelic by any chance?
    Cliste wrote: »
    For "I like their car" I would say

    "Is maith liom a gluaistéain"

    "Is maith liom a ngluaisteáin."

    a (his) => consonant + séimhiú/ no change with vowels
    M.Sh: A charr = his car. A aird = his attention.
    a (her) => no change on consonant/ "h" before vowels
    M.Sh: A carr = her car. A haird = her attention.
    a (their) => urú before the consonant/ 'n' before vowels
    M.Sh: A gcarr = their car. A naird = their attention.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Eh yeah - what he said :pac:

    :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Actually, cars ;)

    Also, I'm pretty sure the hyphen is necessary:

    A n-aird


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    I've never seen that word before. Where did you find it? Old Irish or Scots Gaelic by any chance?

    I'm not sure where I noted it from (it is there a good while). Thanks for your help.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Cliste wrote: »
    Needs context really

    For "I like their car" I would say

    "Is maith liom a gluaistéain"

    And for "It is their computer" I would say

    "is leo an ríomhaire"

    But wait for the true grammar types to give you the specifics!

    Cheers Cliste. It is great to see a fellow GNU/Linux user here.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Worztron wrote: »
    Cheers Cliste. It is great to see a fellow GNU/Linux user here.

    Fáilte fáilte!

    Gaeilge heads are allowed be geeks as well ;-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    How would I say "Roy's Realm" in Irish?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Ríocht Roy (in the sense of kingdom)
    Fearann Roy (in the sense of domain/territory)


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Is this correct?

    killjoy = duarcán

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Yes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Yes.

    I just noticed that it also means 'pessimist'.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Yes, also gloomy and morose person.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Yes, also gloomy and morose person.

    dark, gloomy, morose - duairc

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,697 ✭✭✭ Gumbi


    Yes. It's a bit mis-leading to say "it means killjoy". A better descriptioon would be "it can (and is) used to mean kill joy". The root form of the word is "duairc" as stated above, it is modified to be "duarcán" which makes it a description of a person of type "duairc" :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,341 ✭✭✭ Worztron
    Registered User


    Hi guys.

    Are these translations correct?

    clockwork - dul chun cinn bonn ar aon
    commence - cuir tús le
    commenced - cuireadh tús le
    commencement - tosach feidhme

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,634 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord
    Moderator


    Worztron wrote: »
    commence - cuir tús le
    commenced - cuireadh tús le
    commencement - tosach feidhme

    The translation for "clockwork" is totally wrong.
    I think "tochras" is the closest translation you'll get for that.

    The others are okay. "Tosach" would work its own, even without 'feidhme'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,525 ✭✭✭ Paz-CCFC


    "Tosach feidhme" suggests a more technical use, related to, say, law or government. Eg, if a piece of legislation were to refer to "the commencement of this Act", the Irish would be "tosach feidhme na hAchta seo".

    "Tosach" would be a more informal use, but, then again, would you use "commencement" informally in English? Does the very word not suggest formality and technicality? Whereas, if you were speaking informally, you'd use something like "start"?


    Edit:

    Just re the verb "to commence". Achtanna.ie translates "[it] shall commence" as "tosóidh [sé]". So, that'd suggest that you could use the simpler forms of "tosaigh" and "thosaigh" instead of "cuir tús le" and "cuireadh tús le".

    It's interesting that the noun "commencement" takes a more complicated form, whereas the verb is simply "tosaigh". But anyway, I'm rambling! I hope I've given you some help.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 2 Azebra


    Howdy,

    Can anyone offer some translations for

    So many of my smiles begin with you


    Go raibh mhaith agaif (sp! Sory!)


Advertisement