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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,746 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    josip wrote: »
    How do you spell 'amlach' (clumsy/awkward) in Irish?
    I've never seen the word written, only been on the receiving end of it from my mother :)

    I've never seen it before, but it seems to be "amalach", which is a variant of "gamalach" (meaning silly).

    https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/amalach,+amalaíocht

    https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/gamalach

    :)

    There is another word, "amscaí", which is more common for clumsiness/awkwardness.


  • Registered Users Posts: 480 ✭✭ tv3tg4


    What word do they use in Irish for reliable?

    Another word I am looking for is popular?

    Popular for a place?

    Eg. Killarney is popular


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    tv3tg4 wrote: »
    What word do they use in Irish for reliable?

    Another word I am looking for is popular?

    Popular for a place?

    Eg. Killarney is popular

    reliable = iontaofa

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    tv3tg4 wrote: »
    What word do they use in Irish for reliable?

    Another word I am looking for is popular?

    Popular for a place?

    Eg. Killarney is popular

    popular - coitianta

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,638 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Worztron wrote: »
    popular - coitianta

    Nach bhfuil sé "tá éileamh mór ar Chill Airne"

    I always thought that Coitianta means more "common" or "widespread"


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Grudaire wrote: »
    Nach bhfuil sé "tá éileamh mór ar Chill Airne"

    I always thought that Coitianta means more "common" or "widespread"

    Hi Grudaire. It means a few things -- accustomed, common, ordinary, popular, usual, widespread - coitianta

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,746 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    I'd go with "rogha choitianta" for a popular choice (e.g. Bíonn Cill Áirne ina rogha choitianta ag turasóirí i gcónaí).

    The dictionary does have "coitianta" on its own, but as Grudaire said above, most people would assume other meanings from that word before realising it was supposed to mean popular.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi guys. Is 'gleann álainn na laoi' the correct way to say, 'The Beautiful Lee Valley'? Thanks.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Anyone?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,746 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    Worztron wrote: »
    Anyone?

    My apologies, I "thanked" your post yesterday because you already had the translation correct yourself.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    My apologies, I "thanked" your post yesterday because you already had the translation correct yourself.

    Ah, I see. Thanks IO. I appreciate it. :)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ banterit


    Hello
    I am trying to learn Irish and am listening to radio and tg4 but sometimes I hear a word that I cant find in a dictionary
    one that keeps popping up is what I hear as ''Harrabha'' or something like that ... earlier I heard it before the word deacair. I think it means very but I cant find it on Teanglann the online dictionary

    Any help appreciated


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,746 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    banterit wrote: »
    Hello
    I am trying to learn Irish and am listening to radio and tg4 but sometimes I hear a word that I cant find in a dictionary
    one that keeps popping up is what I hear as ''Harrabha'' or something like that ... earlier I heard it before the word deacair. I think it means very but I cant find it on Teanglann the online dictionary

    Any help appreciated

    That would probably be three words, "thar a bheith", which is a nice way of saying "very", e.g. Thar a bheith deacair = very difficult.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ banterit


    Sin é, go raibh maith agat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi. What does this mean? Is it spelt properly?

    "Lá na Poblachta sona daoibh go léir"

    Thanks.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 576 ✭✭✭ mr chips


    "Happy Republic Day to you all". Spelling all looks fine to me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,486 ✭✭✭✭ Frisbee


    Hey, looking to figure out what the Irish word for 'Links' is. From what I can see 'link' is 'nasc'. I've seen 'naisc' used for the plural but not 100% sure if it is correct or not. It's specifically in relation to a Golf Links, which I have also seen 'Machaire' used in relation to.

    Can anyone give me a steer on which is the correct one? Would Naisc be totally incorrect? Thanks in advance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,262 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Nasc mainly means 'link' in the sense of connection. Machaire looks like the word you want.

    Your link for Machaire gives meaning #2 as "Stretch of level ground; links, course. ~ gailf, golf-course. ~ ráis, race-course".

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Dumhach ghailf.
    Galf-chúrsa dumhcha.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,831 ✭✭✭ heldel00


    I need to translate my married surname into Irish? Could i PM somebody who might be able to offer advice or direct me where to go please?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    mr chips wrote: »
    "Happy Republic Day to you all". Spelling all looks fine to me.

    Thanks, mc. :)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Are these translations accurate?
    • That's all right. - Tá sin ceart go leor.
    • That's all. - Sin é an méid.
    • That's all. - Sin uile.
    • That's all. - Go bhfuil gach.
    Thanks. :)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 938 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    That's all. - Go bhfuil gach.

    That last one doesn't make sense to me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    That's all. - Go bhfuil gach.

    That last one doesn't make sense to me.

    Thanks, AGG. :)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi. Would 'slodáin' be the correct word for 'puddles'? Thanks.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,262 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    My dictionary gives linntreog for puddle. I'm guessing the plural would be linntreoga?

    Dinneen gives

    pluda, g. id., m., puddle (also ploda).

    plod, g. pluid, pl. id., m., a pool of standing water (ploda and plodar, id.).

    plodán, -áin, pl. id., m., a. pool of standing water.

    plodánacht, -a, f., paddling or rowing in water.

    plodarán, -áin, m., a puddle (Con.).

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 302 ✭✭ Piollaire




  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Cheers, Esel & Piollaire. :-)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,118 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi guys. I heard someone say a word that sounds like 'fograth'. Does anyone know what it could be? Maybe it's in 2 words? Thanks.

    Post edited by Worztron on

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 21,262 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    Possibly Fógra - notice, advertisement

    Not your ornery onager



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