Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)
Private profiles - please note that profiles marked as private will soon be public. This will facilitate moderation so mods can view users' warning histories. All of your posts across the site will appear on your profile page (including PI, RI). Groups posts will remain private except to users who have access to the same Groups as you. Thread here
Some important site news, please read here. Thanks!

The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

18910111214»

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 20,093 ✭✭✭✭ Larbre34


    What is that formal greeting at the beginning of some TV programmes, some presenters will say something like 'de barr a meas thú' or Debra meathasa phonetically?

    Ive always wondered and could never quite catch it.



  • Registered Users Posts: 302 ✭✭ Piollaire




  • Registered Users Posts: 55 ✭✭ Korrayls


    Conas atá sibh go léir?

    Táim ag lorg cabhair le tattoo nua atá me chun a fháil.

    táim ag iarraigh aistriu an nath seo go dtí Gaeilge: "MAY LOVE CONNECT US,FAITH DIRECT US, AND GOD PROTECT US"

    Cad a cheapainn sibh faoin aistriúchan seo? "Go nascfar an grá sinn, go ndíreoidh ár gcreideamh sinn agus go gcosnóidh dia sinn"

    b'fhéidir go mbaigh duine éigeann eile in ann aistriúchan níos fearr a dhéanamh.

    I obviously want it to be as unique and accurate as possible without grammatical errors etc...

    Apologies for my rusty irish, I havn't spoken really since i left school many moons ago!!



  • Registered Users Posts: 21,343 ✭✭✭✭ Esel


    I would capitalise Dia. Suppose it's a matter of choice though.

    You could try ringing the Translation Department in the Dáil. I'm sure someone there would be happy to help - they might even know some almost equivalent sayings too which you could consider.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine





  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi. Is Cúirt Róisín = Black Court?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    I guess it means, 'Rose Court'.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,713 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    We have a steep hilly field that is called the bru - presumably with a fada on the u. What does translate as into English?



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 6,713 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    I thought it would mean steep or face or something like that. Went onto Google and found this relating to Old Irish - edge/bank/brink makes sense to me. Does it tie in?

    Your words are classed as 'Irish' as opposed to 'Old Irish'...???


    brú‎ (Irish, Old Irish, Icelandic): meaning, origin, definition - WordSense Dictionary


    brú (Old Irish)

    Origin & history I

    From Proto-Celtic *brusū‎.

    Noun

    brú (fem.)

    1. bellyabdomen
    2. breast
    3. womb
    Descendants

    Origin & history II

    Noun

    brú

    1. edgebrink
    2. bank




  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    The old Irish of "edge, brink, bank" makes sense in your case.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Administrators, Entertainment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 18,728 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ hullaballoo


    I don't think it's old Irish. Teanglann.ie gives it as "brink"/"bank"/"verge" depending on the context (in English):

    brú2, f. 1. Lit: (In phrase) Ar bhrú, on the brink (of). Ar bhrú abhann, on the bank of a river. Ar bhrú éaga, on the verge of death. 2 = BROINN.

    Logainm.ie says that "brú" has lots of meanings in relation to placenames also so basically it could mean anything but it would make sense if there is a stream/river near your field that it has the "bank" meaning. Also to note that Brú na Boinne is the Boyne Valley so it also has that meaning.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,713 ✭✭✭ funkey_monkey


    So it could actually be spelt bhrú rather than brú? I've never seen it spelt before this as it has just been talked about. Thanks to you both.



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 758 ✭✭✭ howareyakid


    Could anyone help me to translate this phrase into Irish: I hope next year is an enjoyable and successful year for our club. I was thinking something like: "Tá súil agam go mbeidh bliain rathúil agus taitneamhach romhaibh le haghaidh gach duine inár gclub an bhliain seo chugainn" but my Irish is a bit rusty at the moment. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,285 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Hi howareyakid. Perhaps this?

    "Tá súil agam gur bliain thaitneamhach agus rathúil í an bhliain seo chugainn dár gclub."

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



Advertisement