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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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  • franc 91 wrote: »
    If you look at focal.ie under the heading - philosophy/fealsunacht (with a fada on the 'u') they give - ainrialachas (fir1) - gu - airialachais

    Are you referring to my post re the Irish word for anarchism?

    I don't fully understand your post. :confused:

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • Yes that's the Irish word they give for anarchism, it's here -
    http://www.focal.ie/Search.aspx?term=anarchism&lang=1




  • franc 91 wrote: »
    Yes that's the Irish word they give for anarchism, it's here -
    http://www.focal.ie/Search.aspx?term=anarchism&lang=1

    Ah, yes. Now I understand. Cheers.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • I was thinking you might not have understood the grammatical terms given above - fir 1, for example means that the noun is masculine and that it's in the first declension, gu refers to its form in the genitive. I don't know whether these are already posted up on the foram, but here they are. I hope you'll find them useful - grammatical terms when you can't understand them can easily put you off, I know that.
    http://nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/afb:
    http://nualeargais.ie/foghlaim/grammarTerms.php




  • Cead 's a haon mile, naoi cead, daichead 's a haon.

    This does not add up (pardon the pun).

    Something like this seems more accurate but is also not perfect for 101,941:

    céad 's a haon míle, naoi céad, daichead 's a haon or céad a haon míle, naoi céad, daichead a haon

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • As Gaeilge dose mean 'in Irish' but the more formal way of saying it would be 'i nGaeilge'

    My best guess for those would be

    Deich mile, seacht cead, caoga haon.
    Cead 's a haon mile, naoi cead, daichead 's a haon.
    Miliún 's seacht mile, naoi cead 's sé deag.
    Biliún, trí miliún, cead 's trocha cuig mile 's ochto.

    Deich míle, seacht gcéad, agus a caoga haon.
    Céad 's a haon míle, naoi gcéad, daichead 's a haon.
    Milliún, seacht míle, naoi gcéad 's a sé déag.
    Billiún, trí mhilliún, céad's triocha cúig míle agus ochtó.

    My best effort; am open to corrections, though.
    (Sorry for being pedantic!!!)




  • What is the Irish word for football?

    Thanks in advance.




  • LordSutch wrote: »
    What is the Irish word for football?

    Thanks in advance.

    Peil/Peile

    Edit:
    Actually scrap Peil Caid - can someone tell me if that is actually an Irish word?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • LordSutch wrote: »
    What is the Irish word for football?

    Thanks in advance.

    soccer - sacair
    GAA football - peil
    (foot)ball - liathróid/peil

    edit: Yeah caid means football also




  • How would I say Red Haired As Gaeilge?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Worztron wrote: »
    How would I say Red Haired As Gaeilge?
    Rua.

    Really, there are all sorts of tools and dictionaries on the internet for finding out this sort of information.
    Why don't you use some of them?

    focal.ie
    acmhainn.ie
    google translate

    just to give three.

    Or buy yourself a dictionary.




  • deirdremf wrote: »
    Rua.

    Really, there are all sorts of tools and dictionaries on the internet for finding out this sort of information.
    Why don't you use some of them?

    focal.ie
    acmhainn.ie
    google translate

    just to give three.

    Or buy yourself a dictionary.

    I tried them but I thought rua is just red?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • Worztron wrote: »
    I tried them but I thought rua is just red?





    Rua applies to hair, ie, 'Donncha Rua' would mean 'Red Haired Donncha'.

    'Madra Rua' is a Fox.




  • Rua applies to hair, ie, 'Donncha Rua' would mean 'Red Haired Donncha'.

    'Madra Rua' is a Fox.

    Gotcha. I was wondering as Hair = Gruaig so rua doesn't seem to make sense. Thanks for clarifying that. ;)

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • Worztron wrote: »
    Gotcha. I was wondering as Hair = Gruaig so rua doesn't seem to make sense. Thanks for clarifying that. ;)



    Think of it this way, Rua = Ginger




  • Think of it this way, Rua = Ginger

    Usually, yes.
    "I have'nt a red cent" translates as "Níl pingin rua agam".
    For The Red Sea we have An Mhuir Rua.




  • Think of it this way, Rua = Ginger

    Ginger = Sinséar

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • Synonyms, homonyms, homophones and the difference between literal and figurative uses of language can make translations more complicated than they need to be.

    I know that's a very general point, but I think it's important to point out in a thread like this. There can be many ways of translating the same word, especially if the English word has multiple meanings (like "ginger" above).




  • Synonyms, homonyms and the difference between literal and figurative uses of language can make translations more complicated than they need to be.

    I know that's a very general point, but I think it's important to point out in a thread like this. There can be many ways of translating the same word, especially if the English word has multiple meanings (like "ginger" above).

    I see. Fair point.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • deirdremf wrote: »
    Rua.

    Really, there are all sorts of tools and dictionaries on the internet for finding out this sort of information.
    Why don't you use some of them?

    focal.ie
    acmhainn.ie
    google translate

    just to give three.

    Or buy yourself a dictionary.

    There's no need to be so harsh! This is what the thread is for after all...


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  • My sir name is Lumley. It comes from Scotish words, Lum meaning clearing and Ley meaning steam or river. Lumley being a clearing by a stream. If I wanted to say that in Irish, how would I say it? Phonetic spelling would help. Thanks.




  • Here's a word I can't find in any of the dictionaries - geafairi (with a 'i' fada at the end) - it comes from a children's rhyme.




  • franc 91 wrote: »
    Here's a word I can't find in any of the dictionaries - geafairi (with a 'i' fada at the end) - it comes from a children's rhyme.

    geafar = boss/gaffer

    It could be a dialectal version of that, geafairí = bosses
    We know how Conamara Irish likes its double plurals


    Edit: Just checked `FGB, geafaire = busybody




  • Go raibh maith agat, a chara.
    You might like to know that it comes from the booklet that goes with the DVD Spraoi le Chéile

    Cuitse! Cuistiu! (with a fada on the last 'u')
    Rincfidh na cearca é
    Cuitse! Cuitsiu! (ditto)
    Rince na ngeafairi (fada on the last 'i')
    Geafairi oga is geafairi crionna;
    Dà mbeadh geafairi eile ann
    Bheadh làn ti againn
    Cuitse! Cuitsiu (ditto)

    Cuitsi, cuitsiu (ditto)
    Rince na ngeafairi.




  • Is there an Irish word for Ingratiate?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • To ingratiate oneself with somebody - fabhar duine a tharraingt ort féin (taken from the Collins Pocket Dictionary)




  • Are these correct for these 2 islands?

    Jersey - Geansaí / Geirsí
    Guernsey - Geirsí

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."





  • Geansai (with a fada on the 'i') means Guernsey but it also means a woollen sweater (whereas in English it's a jersey) and it can used to mean an eejit.




  • mlumley wrote: »
    My sir name is Lumley. It comes from Scotish words, Lum meaning clearing and Ley meaning steam or river. Lumley being a clearing by a stream. If I wanted to say that in Irish, how would I say it? Phonetic spelling would help. Thanks.

    The Gàidhlig word for stream is sruth, and it's the very same in Irish.
    The Gàidhlig word for river is abhainn, and it's the very same in Irish.
    The Gàidhlig word 'lom' means bare and it's the very same in Irish.
    Are you sure about the meaning of "Ley"?
    Lom is pronounced as Lum.


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  • Well from what can I see, Lumley isn't Gaelic at all - I suggest that you have a look at this -
    http://www.englandsnortheast.co.uk/Surnames.html - and scroll down to Lumley - a placename in County Durham of a noble family and castle.


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