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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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  • Registered Users Posts: 941 ✭✭✭An gal gréine


    From what I can gather, the ancient name of Mac Ruairí in Ulster became anglised in Tyrone as McRory/McCrory and in Donegal as Rodgers/Rogers.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,677 ✭✭✭deise go deo


    It's neither right nor wrong.

    Rory is an anglicisation of Ruairí, so the two names are effectively the same, and valid "translations" of one another. Similarly (so far as I know, anyway) Pól is a gaelicisation of Paul, so the words serve as translations of one another.

    There is another phenomenon: the matching of Gaelic names with English ones, often on the basis of some similarity. That's fairly arbitrary. Taking Ruairí as the Irish for Roger is one such arbitrary match. Another arbitrary match that I think odd is setting Abigail as the translation for Gobnait. But who is the gainsay anybody saying "My name in English is Jeremiah; In Irish, I wish to be known as Diarmaid"? There is no right or wrong involved.

    It might become interesting as our "new Irish" with given names from Eastern Europe or from Africa proceed through the school system, and some of them become enthused by the Irish language. What if little Jumoke decides that she wants to be known in Irish as Gráinne?




    Translations that have traditionally been taken to be the same name Bridget - Bríd for examle do not need a deed poll if you wanted to change what appears on your passport, Is there any guideline for at what point you would need a deed poll if you wanted to change your name to an Irish Name.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Translations that have traditionally been taken to be the same name Bridget - Bríd for examle do not need a deed poll if you wanted to change what appears on your passport, Is there any guideline for at what point you would need a deed poll if you wanted to change your name to an Irish Name.

    Do you mean Brigid instead of Bridget?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    What does the Irish word Sloan mean?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,784 ✭✭✭deirdremf


    Pól is a gaelicisation of Paul, so the words serve as translations of one another.
    Many saints' names of this type came in with the Normans, so it probably did too - the pronunciation would seem to point in that direction.
    There is another phenomenon: the matching of Gaelic names with English ones, often on the basis of some similarity. That's fairly arbitrary. Taking Ruairí as the Irish for Roger is one such arbitrary match. Another arbitrary match that I think odd is setting Abigail as the translation for Gobnait. But who is the gainsay anybody saying "My name in English is Jeremiah; In Irish, I wish to be known as Diarmaid"? There is no right or wrong involved.
    I think Diarmaid and Conchubhar were specifically anglicised as Jeremiah and Cornelius in the Cork area. I don't know if that was commonly done elsewhere in Ireland
    Worztron wrote: »
    What does the Irish word Sloan mean?
    Not an Irish word.
    You might meen slán which is used as "goodbye" although it means safe.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭Focalbhach


    deirdremf wrote: »
    I think Diarmaid and Conchubhar were specifically anglicised as Jeremiah and Cornelius in the Cork area. I don't know if that was commonly done elsewhere in Ireland

    My understanding was Diarmaid/Dermot and Conchubhar/Conor...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    deirdremf wrote: »
    Not an Irish word.
    You might meen slán which is used as "goodbye" although it means safe.

    Thanks.

    I had a list of Irish~English words. One entry was:
    A warrior - Sloan

    I know warrior is Laoch/Oglach. I really don't know where I copied and pasted A warrior - Sloan from.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    How would you say this in Irish?

    122 / one-hundred-twenty-two

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,784 ✭✭✭deirdremf


    Worztron wrote: »
    How would you say this in Irish?

    122 / one-hundred-twenty-two
    Céad fiche a dó.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,784 ✭✭✭deirdremf


    Focalbhach wrote: »
    My understanding was Diarmaid/Dermot and Conchubhar/Conor...
    Yes, that would be the case in most places.
    But Cork is different!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,784 ✭✭✭deirdremf


    Worztron wrote: »
    Thanks.

    I had a list of Irish~English words. One entry was:
    A warrior - Sloan

    I know warrior is Laoch/Oglach. I really don't know where I copied and pasted A warrior - Sloan from.
    I've no idea where you could have got it from - it might be a spelling mistake?

    FYI, I've never seen the combination "OA" in Irish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,246 ✭✭✭conor.hogan.2


    Conchúr, I would use for Conor as I am not a fan of the older (inspired) spelling in general.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    deirdremf wrote: »
    I've no idea where you could have got it from - it might be a spelling mistake?

    FYI, I've never seen the combination "OA" in Irish.

    I must have copied and pasted it from somewhere. :o

    That is interesting re "OA" - I never knew that.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    I heard this on the radio one day so I am not sure of the spelling or even if it just one word. It sounds like "fahulach" and was used in a context like "oh no" or "that would be terrible".
    Anybody know what the real word is and what it actually means?


  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭Focalbhach


    I heard this on the radio one day so I am not sure of the spelling or even if it just one word. It sounds like "fahulach" and was used in a context like "oh no" or "that would be terrible".
    Anybody know what the real word is and what it actually means?

    I know it doesn't quite match the sound you heard, but the nearest thing I can think of offhand is uafásach, to mean terrible/really bad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Focalbhach wrote: »
    I know it doesn't quite match the sound you heard, but the nearest thing I can think of offhand is uafásach, to mean terrible/really bad.

    Funnily enough I was also thinking of uafásach. But yes, the pronounciation does not match.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭franc 91


    There's - fadàlach - which can mean tedious


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    franc 91 wrote: »
    There's - fadàlach - which can mean tedious

    I thought boring/tedious was Leadránach?

    Edit: I though fadàlach meant slow? As does Mall.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    I dont think it is uafasach, it was a while ago that I heard it but it has stuck in my mind as more like fo-hu-lach or fa-hu-lach. It was Tom Dunne on his radio show who said it so maybe if anybody knows him they could ask him:)
    I cant remember the exact context it was used in but it was something like I mentioned, the other person said something and he agreed with him and said "oh fahulach" as in "yeah terrible" or "yeah crazy" or "yeah chaos" or something like that.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭franc 91


    Well I looked at Pota Focal to see if there was anything sounded vaguely like what was asked for - there it's given to mean - lingering, slow, tedious and even tiresome.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    How would I say these as Gaeilge (btw, does "as Gaeilge" literally translate as "in Irish"?)

    10,751
    101,941
    1,007,916
    1,003,135,080

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 63 ✭✭whatthefeck


    I heard this on the radio one day so I am not sure of the spelling or even if it just one word. It sounds like "fahulach" and was used in a context like "oh no" or "that would be terrible".
    Anybody know what the real word is and what it actually means?

    "fahulach" sounds very much like flathulach to me.
    Flathulach :Generous / Extravagant
    "He was very Flathulach with his money"

    http://www.forvo.com/word/flaithi%C3%BAlach/


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    "fahulach" sounds very much like flathulach to me.
    Flathulach :Generous / Extravagant
    "He was very Flathulach with his money"

    That could be it, it sounds right and as I said I am not too sure of the exact context it was used in as it was a few months ago and the comment could have meant anything the way it was said but that meaning does sound like it could have fitted in with the conversation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,089 ✭✭✭✭P. Breathnach


    That could be it, it sounds right and as I said I am not too sure of the exact context it was used in as it was a few months ago and the comment could have meant anything the way it was said but that meaning does sound like it could have fitted in with the conversation.
    While generally used in a positive sense, flaithiúlach can sometimes be used negatively to suggest that a person is extravagant or wasteful. I think it is more often used negatively in English, as in the example whatthefeck gives.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    How would I say these as Gaeilge (btw, does "as Gaeilge" literally translate as "in Irish"?)

    10,751
    101,941
    1,007,916
    1,003,135,080

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,677 ✭✭✭deise go deo


    Worztron wrote: »
    How would I say these as Gaeilge (btw, does "as Gaeilge" literally translate as "in Irish"?)

    10,751
    101,941
    1,007,916
    1,003,135,080


    As Gaeilge dose mean 'in Irish' but the more formal way of saying it would be 'i nGaeilge'

    My best guess for those would be

    Deich mile, seacht cead, caoga haon.
    Cead 's a haon mile, naoi cead, daichead 's a haon.
    Miliún 's seacht mile, naoi cead 's sé deag.
    Biliún, trí miliún, cead 's trocha cuig mile 's ochto.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    Deich mile, seacht cead, caoga haon.
    Cead 's a haon mile, naoi cead, daichead 's a haon.
    Miliún 's seacht mile, naoi cead 's sé deag.
    Biliún, trí miliún, cead 's trocha cuig mile 's ochto.

    Do you mean this?

    Deich mile, seacht cead, caoga haon.
    Cead's a haon mile, naoi cead, daichead's a haon.
    Miliún's seacht mile, naoi cead's sé deag.
    Biliún, trí miliún, cead's trocha cuig mile's ochto.


    Cead means "permit".
    Should it be "Deich míle, seacht gcéad, caoga amháin."?

    Did you mean for the space after 's?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭franc 91


    Céad (with a fada on the 'e') can mean a hundred or a century or first (an chéad - the first) - cead (without the fada) means permission - as you said.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,631 ✭✭✭Worztron


    The Irish word for anarchism?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭franc 91


    If you look at focal.ie under the heading - philosophy/fealsunacht (with a fada on the 'u') they give - ainrialachas (fir1) - gu - airialachais


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