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The "What is this Irish word/phrase in English" thread

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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3 Hooch1982


    I think it has something to do with this group: Catholic Truth Society

    See also the sources for this text: http://www.logainm.ie/eolas/Data/IHTA/tuam.pdf


    Ya i could not find alot on the Catholic truth society but i sent a mail to the museum in Tuam to see what they can tell me, i will let you know when they get back to me if you have any interest? Strange thing to find in your back garden !


  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,747 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    Hooch1982 wrote: »
    Ya i could not find alot on the Catholic truth society but i sent a mail to the museum in Tuam to see what they can tell me, i will let you know when they get back to me if you have any interest? Strange thing to find in your back garden !

    I don't have a particular interest in the Society. I just enjoy spur-of-the-moment research! :D I'd be happy to find out more though, so post here or PM me if you get a reply from the museum. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    What is the exat meaning of this "Nollaig shona daoibhse agus athbhlain faoi hmaise daoibhse. Adh mór faoi 2012."?

    Thanks in advance.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Worztron wrote: »
    What is the exat meaning of this "Nollaig shona daoibhse agus athbhlain faoi hmaise daoibhse. Adh mór faoi 2012."?

    Thanks in advance.

    Happy Christmas to you (plural) and happy new year to you. Best of luck in 2012.
    The -se after "daoibh" is unnecessary and should only be used for emphasis.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Happy Christmas to you (plural) and happy new year to you. Best of luck in 2012.
    The -se after "daoibh" is unnecessary and should only be used for emphasis.

    So it is saying Happy Christmas to more than 1 person?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭ Focalbhach


    Yep - the 'daoibh' is 'you plural'. If it was only addressed to one person it would be 'duit' (or in this case, with the emphasis, 'duitse').


  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭ Focalbhach


    "...dom pionta" is often heard when looking for a drink and while it sounds demanding it's not taken to be so.

    "Dom pionta", by itself? Or "tabhair dom pionta"? Or...?

    As a non-native (but interested) speaker this is something I'm always very self-conscious about when ordering in pubs/shops/cafes, etc., in that I'm not sure what the 'natural' way to say it would be. What I mean is that, in English, it sounds natural to say "Can I have a pint?", "Can I get soup and a sandwich?", and so on, but in Irish it doesn't sound natural to me to say "An féidir liom pionta a fháil?", "Ar mhiste leat...", or anything along those lines. Can anyone wiser than me give another perspective?


  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Focalbhach wrote: »
    "Dom pionta", by itself? Or "tabhair dom pionta"? Or...?

    As a non-native (but interested) speaker this is something I'm always very self-conscious about when ordering in pubs/shops/cafes, etc., in that I'm not sure what the 'natural' way to say it would be. What I mean is that, in English, it sounds natural to say "Can I have a pint?", "Can I get soup and a sandwich?", and so on, but in Irish it doesn't sound natural to me to say "An féidir liom pionta a fháil?", "Ar mhiste leat...", or anything along those lines. Can anyone wiser than me give another perspective?

    The "tabhair" is understood but not said.
    By far the most common way is " pionta x le do thoil"
    You will hear beginners say " an bhfuil cead agam pionnta leanna a fháil ".
    I suppose we all have to start somewhere.


  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭ Focalbhach


    You will hear beginners say " an bhfuil cead agam pionnta leanna a fháil ".
    I suppose we all have to start somewhere.

    I wouldn't say "An bhfuil cead agam..." (:))... but am I right in thinking that the equivalent of "Can I get x, please" (in English) is usually more like "Give me x" (in Irish), and that that's not rude?


  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    Focalbhach wrote: »
    I wouldn't say "An bhfuil cead agam..." (:))... but am I right in thinking that the equivalent of "Can I get x, please" (in English) is usually more like "Give me x" (in Irish), and that that's not rude?

    It's in the Gaeltacht, particularly Donegal that you'll hear "...domh pionta".
    The bartender's name could be added if you know it.
    However, in both Gaeltacht and Galltacht "pionta le do thoil" is used and understood and natural.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,571 newmug


    How do you say "just"? Like "I'm just going up the road", or "just give me a small bit of X".


  • Registered Users Posts: 939 ✭✭✭ An gal gréine


    newmug wrote: »
    How do you say "just"? Like "I'm just going up the road", or "just give me a small bit of X".

    Díreach/go díreach.
    Even though your dictionary will say this means "straight", which it does, in the context you mention, "Tá mé (go) díreach ag dul suas an bóthar"...." tabhair dom díreach giota beag de x"


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,278 ✭✭✭ dubhthach


    The idiom "I'm just after x" in Hiberno-English is direct translation from Irish "Tá mé díreach taréis ..."

    One could call it "reverse Béarlachas" ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach


    dubhthach wrote: »
    The idiom "I'm just after x" in Hiberno-English is direct translation from Irish "Tá mé díreach taréis ..."

    One could call it "reverse Béarlachas" ;)

    There is an English word for it: Hibernicism.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    In my copy of the Collins Easy Learning Irish Dictionary there's this -
    I did it just now - anois féin a rinne mé é
    he's just arrived - tà sé direach tagtha (with a fada on the 'i')
    I'm just coming! - Beidh mé leat anois!
    and I think you could also use ach with a negative and a vn
    or to say just so much is enough - is leor


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    What does the phrase here mean (in upper left logo): http://www.indymedia.ie/article/100751

    Saormheáin Éireann

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 30,747 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Insect Overlord


    Free media of Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    What is the Irish for "No overtaking/No passing"?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader


    Worztron wrote: »
    What is the Irish for "No overtaking/No passing"?

    Ná Scoitear


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Does Ni neart go cur le chéile mean There's no strength without unity?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,677 deise go deo


    Worztron wrote: »
    Does Ni neart go cur le chéile mean There's no strength without unity?


    yep


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    Sin é


  • Registered Users Posts: 459 ✭✭ Focalbhach


    What would be the best way to say "Don't be rude" (and then later, while giving out about them, "He was very rude"...)?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader


    Focalbhach wrote: »
    What would be the best way to say "Don't be rude" (and then later, while giving out about them, "He was very rude"...)?

    Ná bí drochbhéasach

    Bhí sé an-drochbhéasach


    mímhúinte aswell means rude/unpolite


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    I see there's also - gan mhuineadh (with a fada on the 'u') which means bad-mannered (literally - without manners) in Pota Focal.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    Is Ruairí the Irish for both Roger and Rory?

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 401 ✭✭ franc 91


    I don't think so - Ruairi/Rory is typically Gaelic (I'm guessing that it's something to do with red) whereas Roger is French - and probably Norman French.
    Originally Roger comes from Hrodgari (Germanic) Hrod meaning glory or honour and gari which means a spear.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,057 Krusader


    The surname Rogers/Rodgers would be Mac Ruairí/Ruaidhrí
    McCrory would be also


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,279 ✭✭✭ Worztron


    This must be wrong so. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Casement

    Roger Casement - Ruairí Mac Easmainn.

    Mitch Hedberg: "Rice is great if you're really hungry and want to eat two thousand of something."



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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,091 ✭✭✭✭ P. Breathnach


    Worztron wrote: »
    This must be wrong so. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Casement

    Roger Casement - Ruairí Mac Easmainn.
    It's neither right nor wrong.

    Rory is an anglicisation of Ruairí, so the two names are effectively the same, and valid "translations" of one another. Similarly (so far as I know, anyway) Pól is a gaelicisation of Paul, so the words serve as translations of one another.

    There is another phenomenon: the matching of Gaelic names with English ones, often on the basis of some similarity. That's fairly arbitrary. Taking Ruairí as the Irish for Roger is one such arbitrary match. Another arbitrary match that I think odd is setting Abigail as the translation for Gobnait. But who is the gainsay anybody saying "My name in English is Jeremiah; In Irish, I wish to be known as Diarmaid"? There is no right or wrong involved.

    It might become interesting as our "new Irish" with given names from Eastern Europe or from Africa proceed through the school system, and some of them become enthused by the Irish language. What if little Jumoke decides that she wants to be known in Irish as Gráinne?


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