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03-01-2012, 02:40   #31
Insect Overlord
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Thanks Insect Overlord, very interesting worth a look into .Go raibh céad maith agat.
I think it has something to do with this group: Catholic Truth Society

See also the sources for this text: http://www.logainm.ie/eolas/Data/IHTA/tuam.pdf

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03-01-2012, 02:50   #32
 
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I think it has something to do with this group: Catholic Truth Society

See also the sources for this text: http://www.logainm.ie/eolas/Data/IHTA/tuam.pdf

Ya i could not find alot on the Catholic truth society but i sent a mail to the museum in Tuam to see what they can tell me, i will let you know when they get back to me if you have any interest? Strange thing to find in your back garden !
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03-01-2012, 03:10   #33
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Ya i could not find alot on the Catholic truth society but i sent a mail to the museum in Tuam to see what they can tell me, i will let you know when they get back to me if you have any interest? Strange thing to find in your back garden !
I don't have a particular interest in the Society. I just enjoy spur-of-the-moment research! I'd be happy to find out more though, so post here or PM me if you get a reply from the museum.
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25-01-2012, 10:45   #34
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What is the exat meaning of this "Nollaig shona daoibhse agus athbhlain faoi hmaise daoibhse. Adh mór faoi 2012."?

Thanks in advance.
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25-01-2012, 12:08   #35
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What is the exat meaning of this "Nollaig shona daoibhse agus athbhlain faoi hmaise daoibhse. Adh mór faoi 2012."?

Thanks in advance.
Happy Christmas to you (plural) and happy new year to you. Best of luck in 2012.
The -se after "daoibh" is unnecessary and should only be used for emphasis.
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25-01-2012, 14:28   #36
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Happy Christmas to you (plural) and happy new year to you. Best of luck in 2012.
The -se after "daoibh" is unnecessary and should only be used for emphasis.
So it is saying Happy Christmas to more than 1 person?
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25-01-2012, 15:22   #37
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Yep - the 'daoibh' is 'you plural'. If it was only addressed to one person it would be 'duit' (or in this case, with the emphasis, 'duitse').
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25-01-2012, 15:34   #38
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"...dom pionta" is often heard when looking for a drink and while it sounds demanding it's not taken to be so.
"Dom pionta", by itself? Or "tabhair dom pionta"? Or...?

As a non-native (but interested) speaker this is something I'm always very self-conscious about when ordering in pubs/shops/cafes, etc., in that I'm not sure what the 'natural' way to say it would be. What I mean is that, in English, it sounds natural to say "Can I have a pint?", "Can I get soup and a sandwich?", and so on, but in Irish it doesn't sound natural to me to say "An féidir liom pionta a fháil?", "Ar mhiste leat...", or anything along those lines. Can anyone wiser than me give another perspective?
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25-01-2012, 16:51   #39
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"Dom pionta", by itself? Or "tabhair dom pionta"? Or...?

As a non-native (but interested) speaker this is something I'm always very self-conscious about when ordering in pubs/shops/cafes, etc., in that I'm not sure what the 'natural' way to say it would be. What I mean is that, in English, it sounds natural to say "Can I have a pint?", "Can I get soup and a sandwich?", and so on, but in Irish it doesn't sound natural to me to say "An féidir liom pionta a fháil?", "Ar mhiste leat...", or anything along those lines. Can anyone wiser than me give another perspective?
The "tabhair" is understood but not said.
By far the most common way is " pionta x le do thoil"
You will hear beginners say " an bhfuil cead agam pionnta leanna a fháil ".
I suppose we all have to start somewhere.
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26-01-2012, 00:32   #40
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You will hear beginners say " an bhfuil cead agam pionnta leanna a fháil ".
I suppose we all have to start somewhere.
I wouldn't say "An bhfuil cead agam..." ()... but am I right in thinking that the equivalent of "Can I get x, please" (in English) is usually more like "Give me x" (in Irish), and that that's not rude?
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26-01-2012, 11:21   #41
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I wouldn't say "An bhfuil cead agam..." ()... but am I right in thinking that the equivalent of "Can I get x, please" (in English) is usually more like "Give me x" (in Irish), and that that's not rude?
It's in the Gaeltacht, particularly Donegal that you'll hear "...domh pionta".
The bartender's name could be added if you know it.
However, in both Gaeltacht and Galltacht "pionta le do thoil" is used and understood and natural.
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26-01-2012, 12:08   #42
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How do you say "just"? Like "I'm just going up the road", or "just give me a small bit of X".
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26-01-2012, 14:33   #43
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How do you say "just"? Like "I'm just going up the road", or "just give me a small bit of X".
Díreach/go díreach.
Even though your dictionary will say this means "straight", which it does, in the context you mention, "Tá mé (go) díreach ag dul suas an bóthar"...." tabhair dom díreach giota beag de x"

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26-01-2012, 15:09   #44
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The idiom "I'm just after x" in Hiberno-English is direct translation from Irish "Tá mé díreach taréis ..."

One could call it "reverse Béarlachas"
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26-01-2012, 15:37   #45
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The idiom "I'm just after x" in Hiberno-English is direct translation from Irish "Tá mé díreach taréis ..."

One could call it "reverse Béarlachas"
There is an English word for it: Hibernicism.
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