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Covid 19 Part XXXIV-249,437 ROI(4,906 deaths) 120,195 NI (2,145 deaths)(01/05)Read OP

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  • Registered Users Posts: 754 ✭✭✭Locotastic


    They should close the schools for two weeks

    They are, this Friday.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,189 ✭✭✭Widdensushi


    Locotastic wrote: »
    They are, this Friday.

    Whoosh


  • Registered Users Posts: 754 ✭✭✭Locotastic


    Whoosh

    :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭gozunda


    namloc1980 wrote: »
    Good stuff. Unfortunately the daily case numbers get all the attention when most of them at this stage are in younger people with very low risk of severe disease or hospitalisation. A refocus is needed.

    Where you getting that from?
    Looking at the latest COVID-19 14-day Epidemiology Report*- from 23 March - it shows that over 50% of the 363 in hospital in that period with covid are under 65 years of age. With approx 30 % of all ICU admissions being in the 45-54 yrs age group.

    So whilst it is true that younger age groups have a lower risk of death - those sick with covid in hospital are made up of a significant number of people under 65.

    Recent reports on some of new variants are linked to increased chance of serious illness in younger people.

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-03-brazil-covid-increasingly-young.html

    It is also true that a large proportion of older age groups are likley to feature less in daily and weekly case numbers in the next couple of months due to the roll-out of vaccinations among these age groups.

    Is a refocus needed? Possibly but probably not in the way you seem to suggest.

    *https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/coronavirus/novelcoronavirus/surveillance/covid-1914-dayepidemiologyreports/COVID-19_14_day_epidemiology_WEB%20report_20210323_v1.0.pdf


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 222 ✭✭Batattackrat


    gozunda wrote: »
    Where you getting that from?
    Looking at the latest COVID-19 14-day Epidemiology Report*- from 23 March - it shows that over 50% of the 363 in hospital in that period with covid are under 65 years of age. With approx 30 % of all ICU admissions being in the 45-54 yrs age group.

    So whilst it is true that younger age groups have a lower risk of death - those sick with covid in hospital are made up of a significant number of people under 65.

    Recent reports on some of new variants are linked to increased chance of serious illness in younger people.

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-03-brazil-covid-increasingly-young.html

    It is also true that a large proportion of older age groups are likley to feature less in daily and weekly case numbers in the next couple of months due to the roll-out of vaccinations among these age groups.

    Is a refocus needed? Possibly but probably not in the way you seem to suggest.

    *https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/respiratory/coronavirus/novelcoronavirus/surveillance/covid-1914-dayepidemiologyreports/COVID-19_14_day_epidemiology_WEB%20report_20210323_v1.0.pdf

    How many of the people currently in the 45-54 range have an underlying illness?

    TBH even without COVID those numbers probably seem about right.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,027 ✭✭✭Ficheall


    How many of the people currently in the 45-54 range have an underlying illness?
    How many people in the general public have an underlying illness?
    I'd be interested in the figures for Ireland, but this suggests that for the US 60% of the general public have underlying conditions:

    https://www.healthline.com/health-news/60-percent-of-americans-have-underlying-condition-that-increases-covid19-risk#Chronic-conditions-increase-risk-of-COVID-19


  • Registered Users Posts: 85,612 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1


    namloc1980 wrote: »
    Testing needs to continue, but the overwhelming focus on the daily announcement/press conference of case numbers needs to come to an end. It's not helping at this stage and just causes more anxiety and hysteria.

    There should be a testing centre at least in every Irish county, in the largest city or town of that county


  • Registered Users Posts: 550 ✭✭✭Sobit1964


    JP Liz V1 wrote: »
    There should be a testing centre at least in every Irish county, in the largest city or town of that county

    Why? On the continent you can buy test kits in supermarkets - ones approved by the EU. They also test if you have had it in the past year.

    These silly displays of pantomime are getting old fast.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,039 ✭✭✭✭retro:electro


    I just despair at what is coming down the line as a result of this. There will be people out there who will have family members that will die due to the suspension of screening and other services for curable cancers. I just can’t wrap my head around the whole thing anymore. The world has lost the plot.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 754 ✭✭✭Locotastic



    Poor woman :(

    My own GP postponed doing cervical checks months ago and still hasn't resumed.

    I think covid will be the least of our problems, the implications of these lockdown measures will last lifetime.


  • Registered Users Posts: 85,612 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1


    Sobit1964 wrote: »
    Why? On the continent you can buy test kits in supermarkets - ones approved by the EU. They also test if you have had it in the past year.

    These silly displays of pantomime are getting old fast.

    I think some pharmacies here provide for high prices

    The fact some are not getting tested maybe without symptoms as no test centre is near them is leading to spread

    I don't see why it is a panto to have a test centre in every county


  • Registered Users Posts: 241 ✭✭purplefields


    gozunda wrote: »
    Recent reports on some of new variants are linked to increased chance of serious illness in younger people.

    This is the scary part.
    I'm guess this is why China locked down and went for covid zero so quickly.
    Probably also why most countries in the world are sacrificing economies to control it. Did you ever consider why a country would otherwise do this?

    The trouble with this virus is that it is contagious before it makes people sick. This means that it does not need to mutate into a milder version to keep going, like previous pandemics.

    Wait until a large proportion of the population is vaccinated until the new variants appear. Probably from a large population, poor country. How about a new variant that kills young people instead, like Spanish flu? - or a variant that is like HIV?

    I believe this is a huge reason for lockdowns.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,189 ✭✭✭Widdensushi


    JP Liz V1 wrote: »
    I think some pharmacies here provide for high prices

    The fact some are not getting tested maybe without symptoms as no test centre is near them is leading to spread

    I don't see why it is a panto to have a test centre in every county

    There are test centres in every county, if you mean the walk in centres that you are only supposed to use if you live within 5k and have no symptoms what would that achieve putting them in a permanent location in the biggest town in each county?


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭gozunda


    How many of the people currently in the 45-54 range have an underlying illness?

    TBH even without COVID those numbers probably seem about right.

    I've really no idea. But do you think a proportion of the 45-54 age group are somehow more likley to have underlying illnesses as opposed let say to the 55-64 age group?

    Afaik all age groups have underlying conditions- whether that's asthma or undiagnosed high blood pressure or contributary lifestyle choices including those who regularly smoke or drink..

    What the figures do show is that there is a significant range of younger age groups in hospitals with covid.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 222 ✭✭Batattackrat


    Locotastic wrote: »
    Poor woman :(

    My own GP postponed doing cervical checks months ago and still hasn't resumed.

    I think covid will be the least of our problems, the implications of these lockdown measures will last lifetime.

    45,000 cases of cancer every year in Ireland and look at the waiting lists.:mad::mad::mad:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/almost-one-million-could-be-on-hospital-waiting-lists-by-year-end-consultants-warn-1.4498974


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,496 ✭✭✭bb1234567


    I just despair at what is coming down the line as a result of this. There will be people out there who will have family members that will die due to the suspension of screening and other services for curable cancers. I just can’t wrap my head around the whole thing anymore. The world has lost the plot.

    What I don't get is why COVID is affecting every single health care setting and causing disfunction in places it should not have any direct impact on. My mum gets regular appointments, blood checks and X-rays still for her thyroid issues but wow they put her through the ringer every time, nurses, radiologists, and other specialists all double checking with her to make sure this is a completely necessary procedure/check up and warning her she shouldn't be engaging with them or requesting any medical assistance that isn't completely urgent. Lack of reponses and huge waiting times too on top of that , all blamed on COVID without much explanation. But when she actually visits the GP, or relevant healthcare department in actual hospital, it's just dead quiet, (and by their own admission that it is very quiet, not just her observance). Staff doing absolutely nothing, because ****ing everything is being cancelled other than absolute essentials.

    I don't understand it at all.Not one bit. Wtf is going on? Why are health specialists in environments unimpacted by COVID surges not operating at anywhere near normal capacity? What are they waiting for?What is the fear of? And when will it ever improve?

    My myms thyroid issues are important to keep on top of but not life threatening, so she doesn't mind too much. I don't know how there aren't more reports like the one above from people distraught about being left int he dark over their life threatening illnesses that are simply being completely and utterly ignored and dismissed. How are they coping? How does anyone deal emotionally with the fact your healthcare providors, your helpline, and something you bank on to keep you safe, just doesn't want to know and is basically telling you to **** off no matter how bad it gets. It's a travesty


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭gozunda


    45,000 cases of cancer every year in Ireland and look at the waiting lists.:mad::mad::mad:

    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/almost-one-million-could-be-on-hospital-waiting-lists-by-year-end-consultants-warn-1.4498974

    I can't read beyond the first paragraph as the article is behind a paywall. But those figures seem to relate to all types of waiting lists

    An interesting article here from the Irish Cancer Soviet

    https://www.cancer.ie/cancer-information-and-support/coronavirus-and-cancer-info-for-patients-families-volunteers/coronavirus-advice-for-cancer-patients-survivors


  • Registered Users Posts: 26,578 ✭✭✭✭Turtwig


    I just despair at what is coming down the line as a result of this. There will be people out there who will have family members that will die due to the suspension of screening and other services for curable cancers. I just can’t wrap my head around the whole thing anymore. The world has lost the plot.


    Not just cancer. Pick any non covid illness. Even those that don't necessarily impact quantity of life just quality. All of these have had services impaired in some shape or manner. This will lead to excess complications, increased morbidity, greater work absenteeism and of course many preventable deaths. Economically entire sectors have been decimated. An entire age demographic will have their potential lifelong earnings severely hindered. People will have lost loved ones. You could go on and on. Collectively we'll have been through a horrific event. Each individual will have experienced its impact differently.

    Hindsight is 20/20 but we should never have let this fcking plague take hold for repeated waves.


  • Registered Users Posts: 85,612 ✭✭✭✭JP Liz V1


    There are test centres in every county, if you mean the walk in centres that you are only supposed to use if you live within 5k and have no symptoms what would that achieve putting them in a permanent location in the biggest town in each county?

    I thought Kildare, Wicklow and Offaly had no test centre or the centres closed down, I could be wrong but that is what I was lead to believe so make shift centres were set up or ambulances out to test


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,134 ✭✭✭caveat emptor


    namloc1980 wrote: »
    Good stuff. Unfortunately the daily case numbers get all the attention when most of them at this stage are in younger people with very low risk of severe disease or hospitalisation. A refocus is needed.

    Yeah maybe more focus on the younger age groups who don't have immunity. If it evolves further in this direction could end up having to suppress it anyway.
    BERLIN (Reuters) - A variant of the coronavirus first detected in Britain, and now spreading in Germany, is more dangerous to young people, Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Wednesday.

    “The British mutant, and this is the difference with the spring, is proven to be more dangerous in children and young people so we need to put the protection of schools more front and centre than with the original virus,” she told lawmakers.

    I'm loving the revisionist history going on here of late.

    I remember when we all locked down and reduced interaction so that schools could open and hospital services could get back to normality.

    This was effectively achieved. Then came along Christmas and we really needed a meaningful Christmas so we kinda went back to normal at the worst possible time of year for respiratory diseases.
    • Hospitals nearly got overrun.
    • Schools closed for the longest period in the history of the state
    • Routine and screening services were suspended.
    • Prolonged closure of business and unemployed.

    In case it's not obvious cancer screening wouldn't have occurred if there was no public health measures. Someone who can't breath is higher when getting triaged unfortunately. The numbers in hospital in January were not sustainable and the exponential increase would have continued.

    The main talking point on here is that NPHET are to blame for cancer screening being postponed. This is just wrong. I agree that this is a massive issue and needs to be resolved extremely quickly but let's not misremember why it came about. Let's also not forget the fateful decisions that led to the sequence of events. There were many on here who were blue in the face saying that Jan / Feb would be horrific but were dismissed as negative nigels. A meaningful Christmas for a disaster quarter year.

    You reap what you sow. You can't advocate for something in December then bemoan the consequences of said decisions 3 months later. Cake and eat it stuff as always. But yeah blame an advisory group while the government hold a climate chat on same day UK asked questions about mistakes made. No answers forthcoming but at least there was conversation. I'd prefer to not have made the mistake. Failing that I'd prefer that we acknowledge the mistake. Doing neither is a recipe for repetition.


    https://twitter.com/Dr2NisreenAlwan/status/1374780949372805125?s=20


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,288 ✭✭✭✭fits



    How do you think they should maintain services with infection rates over 1000/100000. Like we were absolutely riddled with it in January.

    Sorry about this lady though. A relative of mine is going through very similar at the moment same hospitals etc. I don’t know if there was any delay - he first had symptoms in January. I suspect in his case a couple of weeks wouldn’t have made any difference.


  • Posts: 17,378 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    One of the dumbest things Ireland did was use all hospitals as Covid-19 hospitals. There is absolutely no sense to it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,093 ✭✭✭spakman


    One of the dumbest things Ireland did was use all hospitals as Covid-19 hospitals. There is absolutely no sense to it.

    How would they keep it out?


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,184 ✭✭✭prunudo


    JP Liz V1 wrote: »
    I thought Kildare, Wicklow and Offaly had no test centre or the centres closed down, I could be wrong but that is what I was lead to believe so make shift centres were set up or ambulances out to test

    Can't say for Kildare or Offaly but there is definitely test centres in Wicklow.

    On another note, can someone explain why they aren't allowing people with symptoms to get tested in these walk in test centres.
    Why would you bother getting tested if you are feeling fit and well with no symptoms.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,134 ✭✭✭caveat emptor



    This is a shocking story. It's an emergency and they need to get people diagnosed and treated again asap. Health system has been terrible for a very long time and a big part of why we couldn't cope with this pandemic unlike other EU countries that have far more capacity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,328 ✭✭✭Banana Republic 1


    prunudo wrote: »
    Can't say for Kildare or Offaly but there is definitely test centres in Wicklow.

    On another note, can someone explain why they aren't allowing people with symptoms to get tested in these walk in test centres.
    Why would you bother getting tested if you are feeling fit and well with no symptoms.

    Up to 60% of people are a-symptomatic this is what causing the spread it’s only dawning on the gov now 12 months on.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,184 ✭✭✭prunudo


    Up to 60% of people are a-symptomatic this is what causing the spread it’s only dawning on the gov now 12 months on.

    I find it hard to believe that 60% are truly asymptomatic.

    But my point still stands, why would you want to go through the discomfort of a test, having to self isolate while you wait for results if you're feeling fit and well with no symptoms.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,288 ✭✭✭✭fits


    One of the dumbest things Ireland did was use all hospitals as Covid-19 hospitals. There is absolutely no sense to it.

    It’s impossible to keep out with high levels in community. With aggressive suppression and contact tracing it might be a different story.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,328 ✭✭✭Banana Republic 1


    prunudo wrote: »
    I find it hard to believe that 60% are truly asymptomatic.

    Ffs! That has been known for almost 12 months.


This discussion has been closed.
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