Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Covid 19 Part XXXIV-249,437 ROI(4,906 deaths) 120,195 NI (2,145 deaths)(01/05)Read OP

Options
12467328

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,140 ✭✭✭prunudo


    Ffs! That has been known for almost 12 months.

    No need for the ffs! I'm not saying there aren't any asymptomatic cases. Just that the 60% is very high, did all these people really not have a tickle in their throat, a random cough, a sleepness night, a slightly higher temp than normal. As I said I find hard to believe that that many are truly asymptomatic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,295 ✭✭✭✭lawred2


    bb1234567 wrote: »
    What I don't get is why COVID is affecting every single health care setting and causing disfunction in places it should not have any direct impact on. My mum gets regular appointments, blood checks and X-rays still for her thyroid issues but wow they put her through the ringer every time, nurses, radiologists, and other specialists all double checking with her to make sure this is a completely necessary procedure/check up and warning her she shouldn't be engaging with them or requesting any medical assistance that isn't completely urgent. Lack of reponses and huge waiting times too on top of that , all blamed on COVID without much explanation. But when she actually visits the GP, or relevant healthcare department in actual hospital, it's just dead quiet, (and by their own admission that it is very quiet, not just her observance). Staff doing absolutely nothing, because ****ing everything is being cancelled other than absolute essentials.

    I don't understand it at all.Not one bit. Wtf is going on? Why are health specialists in environments unimpacted by COVID surges not operating at anywhere near normal capacity? What are they waiting for?What is the fear of? And when will it ever improve?

    My myms thyroid issues are important to keep on top of but not life threatening, so she doesn't mind too much. I don't know how there aren't more reports like the one above from people distraught about being left int he dark over their life threatening illnesses that are simply being completely and utterly ignored and dismissed. How are they coping? How does anyone deal emotionally with the fact your healthcare providors, your helpline, and something you bank on to keep you safe, just doesn't want to know and is basically telling you to **** off no matter how bad it gets. It's a travesty

    It's dystopian at this stage


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,272 ✭✭✭theballz


    Numbers going up, very concerning - wave 4 coming anyone?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,727 ✭✭✭Wolf359f


    Up to 60% of people are a-symptomatic this is what causing the spread it’s only dawning on the gov now 12 months on.

    It has never been that high. It's more like 25% of people are truly asymptomatic (excluding pre-symptomatic).
    12 months on one would expect people to know that!


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,328 ✭✭✭Banana Republic 1


    Wolf359f wrote: »
    It has never been that high. It's more like 25% of people are truly asymptomatic (excluding pre-symptomatic).
    12 months on one would expect people to know that!

    Read the science.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,775 ✭✭✭PowerToWait


    lawred2 wrote: »
    It's dystopian at this stage

    Hysterical.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,389 ✭✭✭irishguy1983


    Just 310 in hospital - seems like a good drop in numbers at hospitals? Yet no one talking about it? Am I missing something maybe??


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,516 ✭✭✭bennyl10


    Read the science.

    Care to provide?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,251 ✭✭✭speckle


    Sobit1964 wrote: »
    1616613631676.png

    So its basically just kids who are very unlikely to even have symptoms.

    [and a couple of 30yo people reliving what life was like back in the good old days]

    Time to test people for t cell/etc immuniity.I propose cork and kerry for a number of reasons. We can always also throw in one of the dublin areas and maybe donegal this time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,727 ✭✭✭Wolf359f


    Read the science.

    Going by our own reports, I think you're science maybe wrong:
    Symptoms.png


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 15,202 ✭✭✭✭stephenjmcd




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,328 ✭✭✭Banana Republic 1


    Wolf359f wrote: »
    Going by our own reports, I think you're science maybe wrong:
    Symptoms.png

    And you pulled that from were exactly, it could be anything


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,548 ✭✭✭Leftwaffe


    Just 310 in hospital - seems like a good drop in numbers at hospitals? Yet no one talking about it? Am I missing something maybe??

    All about cases. Cases = deaths to a lot of people.


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,136 ✭✭✭✭is_that_so


    Just 310 in hospital - seems like a good drop in numbers at hospitals? Yet no one talking about it? Am I missing something maybe??
    Stubborn levels of cases is what is distracting people along with an R0 around 1 that could easily see cases jump and maybe produce a rise in hospital cases. Falling hospital numbers are good just as long as it continues on that trajectory.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,295 ✭✭✭✭lawred2


    Hysterical.

    It's not. Wife works in cancer treatment and screening is way down. That's a fact. Dismiss it as hysterical all you like.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,295 ✭✭✭✭lawred2


    Just 310 in hospital - seems like a good drop in numbers at hospitals? Yet no one talking about it? Am I missing something maybe??

    Those that shout the loudest have little interest in good news stories.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,548 ✭✭✭Leftwaffe


    Genuine question, considering the age profile of yesterday’s cases, how many of those will end up in hospital typically?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,172 ✭✭✭wadacrack



    We probably should have went the one dose route.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,727 ✭✭✭Wolf359f




  • Registered Users Posts: 32,136 ✭✭✭✭is_that_so


    Leftwaffe wrote: »
    Genuine question, considering the age profile of yesterday’s cases, how many of those will end up in hospital typically?
    In comparison with older age groups very few but the fear is these cases may n time seed disease in older groups who could end up in hospital. Positivity rates of over 20% in close contacts suggest that concern is justified.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 32,136 ✭✭✭✭is_that_so


    wadacrack wrote: »
    We probably should have went the one dose route.
    Very few countries have. Israel is a special case and are providing data for the rest of the world.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,525 ✭✭✭kilns


    At least some seem to think that Ireland are doing a good job.

    Here in Switzerland as of last night Ireland has been taken off the mandatory quarantine list, so if you enter from Ireland with a negative test you can freely move about as normal


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,389 ✭✭✭irishguy1983


    lawred2 wrote: »
    Those that shout the loudest have little interest in good news stories.

    Maybe...I just remember it being about 380 a week or so ago - seems like a big drop....Also I think someone said in the news ‘hospital cases remain stagnant’.....Yet now it appears we have a big drop and I’m not hearing anything on this!!


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Yeah maybe more focus on the younger age groups who don't have immunity. If it evolves further in this direction could end up having to suppress it anyway.



    I'm loving the revisionist history going on here of late.

    I remember when we all locked down and reduced interaction so that schools could open and hospital services could get back to normality.

    This was effectively achieved. Then came along Christmas and we really needed a meaningful Christmas so we kinda went back to normal at the worst possible time of year for respiratory diseases.
    • Hospitals nearly got overrun.
    • Schools closed for the longest period in the history of the state
    • Routine and screening services were suspended.
    • Prolonged closure of business and unemployed.

    In case it's not obvious cancer screening wouldn't have occurred if there was no public health measures. Someone who can't breath is higher when getting triaged unfortunately. The numbers in hospital in January were not sustainable and the exponential increase would have continued.

    The main talking point on here is that NPHET are to blame for cancer screening being postponed. This is just wrong. I agree that this is a massive issue and needs to be resolved extremely quickly but let's not misremember why it came about. Let's also not forget the fateful decisions that led to the sequence of events. There were many on here who were blue in the face saying that Jan / Feb would be horrific but were dismissed as negative nigels. A meaningful Christmas for a disaster quarter year.

    You reap what you sow. You can't advocate for something in December then bemoan the consequences of said decisions 3 months later. Cake and eat it stuff as always. But yeah blame an advisory group while the government hold a climate chat on same day UK asked questions about mistakes made. No answers forthcoming but at least there was conversation. I'd prefer to not have made the mistake. Failing that I'd prefer that we acknowledge the mistake. Doing neither is a recipe for repetition.


    https://twitter.com/Dr2NisreenAlwan/status/1374780949372805125?s=20

    While you’re not wrong about some of you say, I think you are fundamentally wrong to not recognise that the balance between protecting us from COVID and burning the economy to the ground is changing. Serious illness WILL be lower as the vulnerable are vaccinated.....the UK experience this year clearly shows that. While the virus may have a different effect on younger people now (not borne out in the UK incidentally), the equation that supports lockdown had changed

    The UK have removed case numbers in isolation from their tests to relax restrictions. Whitty said that case numbers will rise substantially but that he does not see that affecting the roadmap to normality. The data points informing our own lockdown decisions need to change at some point. But all the narrative suggests that we are stuck with this. There do not seem to be any dissenting voices

    We are continuing to burn our economy to the ground, and impacting the lives, to a devastating degree, of large segments of our population

    It’s a balance, and the balance is shifting. We need to start moving toward living with this in our society


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,251 ✭✭✭speckle


    prunudo wrote: »
    No need for the ffs! I'm not saying there aren't any asymptomatic cases. Just that the 60% is very high, did all these people really not have a tickle in their throat, a random cough, a sleepness night, a slightly higher temp than normal. As I said I find hard to believe that that many are truly asymptomatic.

    Shame just suposing.. if 60% are truly asymtomatic with the vaste majority of them having no long term sequale then why couldnt send them out to get covid and then they and the over 70s etc with the injection would give us herd community immunity.
    The number is lower but still I like to imagine.. what if its say 30% asymtomatic and 30% sniffles. Good morning all...today is a new day... and I'm feeling good...



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,677 ✭✭✭Happydays2020


    Maybe...I just remember it being about 380 a week or so ago - seems like a big drop....Also I think someone said in the news ‘hospital cases remain stagnant’.....Yet now it appears we have a big drop and I’m not hearing anything on this!!

    The drop does not suit the narrative of a 4th wave.

    Have we the virus largely under control? Yes - but some areas are stubbornly high.

    Are there still risks? Yes, but the risks will drop significantly over the next 6 - 8 weeks as the most vulnerable are vaccinated?

    Do we still need restrictions? Yes, but there needs to be a reopening plan linked to targets being met.

    Will normality return soon? Yes. But gradually. And some sectors such as indoor hospitality, pubs and nightclubs etc will probably have restrictions until late summer and Autumn.


  • Posts: 17,378 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    fits wrote: »
    It’s impossible to keep out with high levels in community. With aggressive suppression and contact tracing it might be a different story.

    Yeah, I'm talking in the past tense. There should have been one hospital in the country for Covid-19 patients this time last year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,328 ✭✭✭Banana Republic 1


    Leftwaffe wrote: »
    Genuine question, considering the age profile of yesterday’s cases, how many of those will end up in hospital typically?

    I don’t know the stats but The B117 variant effects younger people more that’s the problem


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,251 ✭✭✭speckle


    Wolf359f wrote: »

    I think what we are missing though is a breakdown of postive cases per symtoms in each age group. There is already a chart showing the different levels of severitymaybe the cases should be shown by this. eg there are three levels within mild moderate and severe...maybe someone could post it here.

    Edit..and how long is the average stay in hospital for each age group eg is it one overnight in the under 50s ? And what percentage of total cases eg under 50 end up in ICU here in Ireland.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 1,548 ✭✭✭Leftwaffe


    I don’t know the stats but The B117 variant effects younger people more that’s the problem

    Does it? I don’t see much talk about this UK variant in the UK. We’re more afraid of it than they are


This discussion has been closed.
Advertisement