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27-03-2010, 18:16   #1
darkman2
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Significant Snow risk - Monday 29th/Tuesday 30th

As in the other thread I was saying that this will have to be watched very closely and definately needs a dedicated thread at this stage. It looks certain at this stage that large parts of the UK will have some very disruptive snowfall on Tuesday and Ireland is likely to get some even to very low levels.





The models are just firming up on the track of this depression but crucially Ireland is always on the cold side. Inland areas are most likely to see disruptive snowfall from Monday night and it will be exceptionally cold for the time of year on Tuesday with max temperatures of no more then 2 or 3C and sleet and snow too.





This is probrably one of the most classic significant snow evolutions that Ireland can possibly get. The wind direction also means that Eastern coasts will also be at risk. So basically it will be raining up till Monday night quite widely (heavy rain) and then things will get wintry overnight and on Tuesday and disruption is probrably likely Tuesday morning.

Last edited by darkman2; 28-03-2010 at 03:19.
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27-03-2010, 18:25   #2
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As in the other thread I was saying that this will have to be watched very closely and definately needs a dedicated thread at this stage. It looks certain at this stage that large parts of the UK will have some very disruptive snowfall on Tuesday and Ireland is likely to get some even to very low levels.





The models are just firming up on the track of this depression but crucially Ireland is always on the cold side. Inland areas are most likely to see disruptive snowfall from Monday night and it will be exceptionally cold for the time of year on Tuesday with max temperatures of no more then 2 or 3C and sleet and snow too.





This is probrably one of the most classic significant snow evolutions that Ireland can possibly get. The wind direction also means that Eastern coasts will also be at risk. So basically it will be raining up till Monday night quite widely (heavy rain) and then things will get wintry overnight and on Tuesday and disruption is probrably likely Tuesday morning.

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27-03-2010, 18:27   #3
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Major Ramp!!
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27-03-2010, 19:15   #4
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oh yes!! hurray yay!! its a major upgrade with temps being 3c on monday instead of 6c.. and snow further north so we get a chance then after that 5c maxes and loads of snow showers!! i love this it better stay and not downgrade!
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27-03-2010, 19:25   #5
 
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I would be more concerned at the possibility of flooding being the disruptive factor from this set up rather than from snow. Some prolonged rainfall in coastal counties of the south and east is forecast, with other areas also at risk depending on how far the occlusion penetrates north and how active it remains overland.

Last edited by Deep Easterly; 27-03-2010 at 19:29. Reason: too many norths
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27-03-2010, 19:26   #6
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One last snow day before i move back to the city, i hope so!
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27-03-2010, 19:28   #7
 
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One last snow day before i move back to the city, i hope so!
Had enough of the hills have we? I don't blame you.
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27-03-2010, 19:30   #8
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Had enough of the hills have we? I don't blame you.
Its nice when you have an inch or so of fluffy stuff, but a foot of lead like slops is another matter.
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27-03-2010, 19:54   #9
 
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I would be more concerned at the possibility of flooding being the disruptive factor from this set up rather than from snow. Some prolonged rainfall in coastal counties of the south and east is forecast, with other areas also at risk depending on how far the occlusion penetrates north and how active it remains overland.
I agree, I think the thread's title's a tad alarmist, and "very disruptive snowfall" a gross exaggeration. Maybe the mountains of Scotland and the Pennines yes, but I don't see much chance of any disruption here, some lying snow on mountains maybe, but at lower levels any snow, if any, will be short lived and will not stick. As DE said, the rainfall's going to be the problem.
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27-03-2010, 19:56   #10
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I agree, I think the thread's title's a tad alarmist, and "very disruptive snowfall" a gross exaggeration. Maybe the mountains of Scotland and the Pennines yes, but I don't see much chance of any disruption here, some lying snow on mountains maybe, but at lower levels any snow, if any, will be short lived and will not stick. As DE said, the rainfall's going to be the problem.
awww here we go again.. everything being downgraded... 3c maxes i do think is cold enough for snow to lie and i do think the hills here are near certain to get some snow lying on them...
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27-03-2010, 20:12   #11
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I agree, I think the thread's title's a tad alarmist, and "very disruptive snowfall" a gross exaggeration.
The thread title is correct. If you bothered to read the OP you would notice I never mentioned "very disruptive snowfall" for Ireland.


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Maybe the mountains of Scotland and the Pennines yes,
IMO this is wrong.


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but I don't see much chance of any disruption here,
There is a risk of significant snowfall and when that happens there is always the risk of disruption.


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some lying snow on mountains maybe, but at lower levels any snow, if any, will be short lived and will not stick. As DE said, the rainfall's going to be the problem.
Rainfall won't be a major issue even though it may be heavy at times.


That is my take on the charts at any rate.
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27-03-2010, 20:21   #12
owenc
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The thread title is correct. If you bothered to read the OP you would notice I never mentioned "very disruptive snowfall" for Ireland.




IMO this is wrong.




There is a risk of significant snowfall and when that happens there is always the risk of disruption.




Rainfall won't be a major issue even though it may be heavy at times.


That is my take on the charts at any rate.
its more than certain that snow will fall to low levels here anyway and lie most likely on the hills maybe giving them a couple of inches... but i didnt think we were likely to see snow lie on low levels is that what your saying? theres a high risk?
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27-03-2010, 20:28   #13
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its more than certain that snow will fall to low levels here anyway and lie most likely on the hills maybe giving them a couple of inches... but i didnt think we were likely to see snow lie on low levels is that what your saying? theres a high risk?
I would not say it's a "high risk" risk but it is a risk. It depends on how things shape up in the next 48hrs - for accumulations at low levels this time of year you need heavy and persistent snow. That may happen but there is still time left for things to change either way.
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27-03-2010, 20:32   #14
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I would not say it's a "high risk" risk but it is a risk. It depends on how things shape up in the next 48hrs - for accumulations at low levels this time of year you need heavy and persistent snow. That may happen but there is still time left for things to change either way.
yea we shall see but im expecting what ive been waiting for, for ages and that is sunshine in temps of around 4-5c and snow showers passing by... love that... and hopefully it comes and id say at some point the hill behind me will have a covering maybe a couple of inches... this year everytime it has snowed it has had at least a couple of inches and that is only from passing showers shows how much heavier the showers are up higher.. down here those showers would only really amount to couple of cms..
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27-03-2010, 20:32   #15
 
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The thread title is correct. If you bothered to read the OP you would notice I never mentioned "very disruptive snowfall" for Ireland.
And if you'd bothered to read my post correctly you'd see that I never said you'd mentioned it for Ireland, it was for the UK. But you did say disruptive snowfall for Ireland, leaving out the "very" - which I don't agree with. That's my take on the situation.
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