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you should just "GET OVER" ever owning a home says PP boss

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,003 ✭✭✭ dev100


    kupus wrote:
    Tighten your belts and eat bread.

    padd b1975 wrote:
    The glib answer is to plough every last penny into a pension scheme, we all know how they have performed in recent years!!


    Bread isn't cheap either )

    Pension scheme I had that argument with a pension advisor / salesman.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,740 ✭✭✭ the evasion_kid


    The system favours the 1%...try even starting a small business these days...absolute minefield


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭ genericguy


    see post #77

    No I'm not going rooting through your ill informed shyte.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,709 ✭✭✭ Baylor Long Riverside


    lawlolawl wrote: »
    I bought my house in the middle of a recession like any sane person should and i have my mortgage 2/3rds payed off after about 6 years.

    You can easily afford to own a house if you actually put some thought into the years-long commitment you are going to make.

    Yes, well life isn't that simple. I'm sick of people trying to make out that they were 'clever' by buying their house during the recession. Most of them just got lucky with their timing.
    And to be honest, even people who bought during the recession would have needed a hefty deposit to have two thirds of a mortgage paid off in six years.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,759 ✭✭✭ Winterlong


    Yes, well life isn't that simple. I'm sick of people trying to make out that they were 'clever' by buying their house during the recession. Most of them just got lucky with their timing.
    And to be honest, even people who bought during the recession would have needed a hefty deposit to have two thirds of a mortgage paid off in six years.

    Getting a mortgage was also very difficult post 2008. You needed a dead cert of a job and had to show a lot more financial history than before. So only the lucky few were getting approvals, not the clever ones IMO.

    I reckon a lot of people wanted a mortgage during that time but simply could not get one.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,733 ✭✭✭ Floppybits


    Jawgap wrote: »
    HensVassal wrote: »
    Do you own a car or rent one?

    I lease. it makes more sense with a depreciating asset.

    Home ownership is not for everyone, but it seems in this country people are convinced otherwise.

    Who are you leasing the car off? I am interested in that. Can drive around in a nice car and anything that goes wrong drop it back to the folks I lease it off to fix. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,759 ✭✭✭ Winterlong


    Floppybits wrote: »
    Who are you leasing the car off? I am interested in that. Can drive around in a nice car and anything that goes wrong drop it back to the folks I lease it off to fix. :)

    leaseplan are the biggest operators in ireland - i think.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,081 ✭✭✭✭ Maximus Alexander


    I'm going to buy a house. She can f*ck off.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,110 ✭✭✭✭ TheDoc


    adam14 wrote: »
    How are people supposed to rent when they retire? Where is the money to come from - approx 60% of people have no private pension.

    A problem barely getting mention in this housing crisis issue, that if it continues longterm and me move to a move rent based situation, there needs to be some serious new legislations and care put in place to cope with the retired segment of the population.

    Also this article, which is really a link to a quote, can go and ****. "Millionaire exec tells people to stop wanting nice things".

    Paypal are curiously using the housing issue as a constant redline article. Feels like they are either laying the excuses early for their exit from Ireland, or trying to cut costs with staff and have them point the finger elsewhere


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,248 ✭✭✭✭ Akrasia


    Yes, well life isn't that simple. I'm sick of people trying to make out that they were 'clever' by buying their house during the recession. Most of them just got lucky with their timing.
    And to be honest, even people who bought during the recession would have needed a hefty deposit to have two thirds of a mortgage paid off in six years.

    Yep, Ordinary people are basically stuck between a rock and a hard place. During the bubble prices were increasing massively but banks were throwing money at people, but after the crash, houses became affordable again, but nobody could get a mortgage cause the banks were busy shutting the barn door after the horse had bolted.

    People with liquid assets were able to make a fortune hoovering up land and houses and businesses that were going in fire sales


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,520 ✭✭✭ allibastor


    She is only saying that because the talent retention people at Paypal cant recruit due to now housing for new staff.

    More people would rent here, but renting is sh1t. Poor quality houses where the LL refuses to do work or upgrade.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,602 ✭✭✭ cerastes


    smash wrote: »
    They could shop around, it's what people do in other countries. In Ireland however, people seem to have a weird sense of loyalty to their bank who are ripping them off so much.

    shop around, but what difference does that make if there isnt value nationally in banks?
    If you can afford it buy, especially within the current central bank limits. In the long run it's better but I wouldn't call rent dead money. Renting is a service and it protects you from costs like structural repairs and provides flexibility of living, particularly for young professionals. Comparisons to central European regimes are flawed as there needs to be a cultural, legal and mindset shift that would take decades to implement.

    I think flexibility of living has been shown to not be the case, renters in many cases are tied to existing contracts for fear of what may come if they move to a new landlord, thats not even to mention the availability.
    As for protection from costs like structural repairs, expect any costs to be passed along generally, but if its a hedge fund you are garaunteed it will be spread across everyone.
    the protection from rent increases needs to be parallel to protection for landlords from costs from local authority or state body's such as excessive taxation.
    nullzero wrote: »
    How is it always rich people with several properties to their names who make these comments?
    Ireland has a terrible rental market which is essentially unregulated and whilst not outwardly anti tenant is still visibly pro landlord.
    In a rental market where tenants are treated correctly these type of comments from elite nit wits can be seen as having some logical basis, but in the current rental climate in Ireland anyone making these type of comments simply puts themselves in the Marie Antoinette role of essentially saying "let them eat cake".

    More like, dont even think about cake, might get some crumbs.
    TheDoc wrote: »
    A problem barely getting mention in this housing crisis issue, that if it continues longterm and me move to a move rent based situation, there needs to be some serious new legislations and care put in place to cope with the retired segment of the population.

    Also this article, which is really a link to a quote, can go and ****. "Millionaire exec tells people to stop wanting nice things".

    Paypal are curiously using the housing issue as a constant redline article. Feels like they are either laying the excuses early for their exit from Ireland, or trying to cut costs with staff and have them point the finger elsewhere

    How do you think that will be handled? oppresive over regulation to foist the problem onto the few remaining legitimate landlords by well meaning but oppressive nannying liberal fascists.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 7,223 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Michael D Not Higgins


    cerastes wrote: »
    I think flexibility of living has been shown to not be the case, renters in many cases are tied to existing contracts for fear of what may come if they move to a new landlord, thats not even to mention the availability.
    As for protection from costs like structural repairs, expect any costs to be passed along generally, but if its a hedge fund you are garaunteed it will be spread across everyone.
    the protection from rent increases needs to be parallel to protection for landlords from costs from local authority or state body's such as excessive taxation.

    It's in relation to a mortgage, of course renting is more flexible than buying a house. If you got laid off and had to get a new job in another part of the country, you can negotiate with the landlord to break the lease or assign the remainder of the lease so you can move elsewhere. Not so easy when you have a mortgage.

    Sure there may be some supply issues right now but that's also affecting the buying market.

    As for the costs, the market rent is the market rent, it's completely separate from the landlord's financial situation. The rents are high now because of supply but rents were being revised downwards around 2009/2010 because of the crash. If the landlord suddenly had a big bill related to the property there was no way to increase the rent to get anything back because tenants could just move somewhere cheaper.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,929 ✭✭✭✭ Ads by Google


    So we have stopped blaming the banks so instead, we're blaming hedge funds.

    Anything but being angry at your friends, neighbours, family and colleagues.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,602 ✭✭✭ cerastes


    So we have stopped blaming the banks so instead, we're blaming hedge funds.

    Anything but being angry at your friends, neighbours, family and colleagues.

    Yeh, sure didn't we all party?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,929 ✭✭✭✭ Ads by Google


    cerastes wrote: »
    Yeh, sure didn't we all party?

    No. But I'm sure you know a few people who flipped houses or bought them to rent and you don't blame them in the slightest.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,370 ✭✭✭✭ Strumms


    How ridiculous is this **** she was spinning...

    why don’t we all get over owning other things, things needed and which we could pay a fortune to instead simply utilize but that less to actually own where we have security and an asset too..

    should we get over owning...

    cars

    guitar collections

    artwork

    ....

    like I said in a previous thread it’s only a time before some of these gimps want to requisition our properties.... sorry we have to requisition your three bed house as only you a single person don’t ‘need’ it...

    your SUV as you as a ‘single’ person don’t need it.

    fûckin democracy not a communist utopia



  • Registered Users Posts: 23,796 ✭✭✭✭ Peregrinus


    Advocating wider property ownership is not a move to the left, Sunny.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 186 ✭✭ Luttrell1975


    Any other country in the world this comment doesn't get picked up, nor does it offend anyone.



  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 59,582 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Wibbs


    The thing about the average person owning a home, or owning pretty much anything of value is quite a recent one. Up until around WW2 the vast majority rented and the very rich(and corporations) held all the cards. The post war boom in the US gave your average family the idea and reality of their own home with a picket fence in suburbia, with their own car. With fins and a V8. 😁 Then a little later on "cheap" credit came along with the credit card. Ireland was behind the curve because of our relative poverty as a nation but we caught up.

    So owning rather than renting stuff is quite a short blip in human history and the very wealthy want their control back(governments like it too). It's not a conspiracy theory or any of that ballsology. Follow the money and follow human nature and it's all in plain sight. Remember records and CD's and videotapes and DVD's? Where you "owned" your music and films and TV series? Now people mostly rent them. If you've a phone contract you're essentially renting your phone, in between its short life from factory to landfill, until the next dopamine hit comes along. Cars will almost certainly be rented and controlled by the manufacturers more and more. Pretty much everything save for the clothes on your back will be a rented "utility". It simply makes for better and more consistent profits for the wealthy.

    Rejoice in the awareness of feeling stupid, for that’s how you end up learning new things. If you’re not aware you’re stupid, you probably are.



  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 2,789 ✭✭✭ Raichu


    Mup the resurrection of a 5 year old thread 😂



  • Registered Users Posts: 23,603 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,532 ✭✭✭ FishOnABike


    Maybe she should follow her line of thought to its logical conclusion and distribute PayPal's assets evenly among everyone in every country PayPal has a corporate presence. Or does not owning things only apply to others.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,006 ✭✭✭ Sunny Disposition


    The fact that people like this woman are asked their views at public events and the responses end up reported in national papers says quite a bit about how the country has been for maybe 20 years now. Paypal is a financial tech company ffs!



  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Why we are getting upset over this person is beyond me. People do whine too much, get your act together, start saving, find a partner with a decent income, and maybe, just maybe, you can join the rest of us in home ownership, you plebs.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,998 ✭✭✭ NSAman


    So rent on a two bedroomed apartment in the docklands runs at 3-5K per month.

    What mortgage would that allow someone to purchase a home?

    Sorry, this lady needs a swift kick in the G** and I am sure she owns a home herself.

    Property ownership is not only about bricks and mortar. It gives you stability. It allows people to make lives, families and a certain lifestyle. It allows people to be creative with the property that they OWN.

    Renting has it's place but to set down roots, buying is the only option IMHO.



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,136 ✭✭✭✭ whisky_galore


    And the alternative is renting a sh1tbox and getting raped financially for doing so.



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  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 2,789 ✭✭✭ Raichu


    Well, if we take 5k a month over say 25 years (not counting for interest or anything) you’re looking at €1.5m

    but affordability is one thing, just getting the bank to entertain a mortgage these days will prove hardship enough.



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