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Boating chit chat thread.

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  • Registered Users Posts: 20,054 ✭✭✭✭neris


    Those gill gloves are good probly the best in winter for everyone but the driver who can wear thicker. Got a pair of socks in pennys during the week. Thick heat insulating pair for a fiver. Not worn out sailing yet but nice n toasty to wear out in shoes. Should work perfectly in sailing boots


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Stheno


    neris wrote: »
    Those gill gloves are good probly the best in winter for everyone but the driver who can wear thicker. Got a pair of socks in pennys during the week. Thick heat insulating pair for a fiver. Not worn out sailing yet but nice n toasty to wear out in shoes. Should work perfectly in sailing boots

    Are you me? I bought those 2.0 tog socks recently and wore them out today, felt slightly cold after about 6 hours, but nothing like last week.

    Completely changed what I wore compared to last week, had three of those base layer tops on, plus a wool jumper then a windstopper jacket, then the sailing jacket.

    Leggings, trousers, sailing trousers as before.

    Had those socks on, made a big difference, and the new gill gloves were great, was flying a kite for an hour or so, and they did feel like the sheets were going through them a little, but it was new to me, so no big deal :)

    I need new boots, I have rubber crewsavers and they are cold, and also I've figured out that the busier I am, the warmer I am, I was redfaced and sweating at one point today whereas last week, I was on the rails, and didn't do much.

    Have to say thanks for all the advice on here, definitely made a difference today.

    Off to search for boots now :) I am tempted to go the dinghy boots/hot socks route!


  • Registered Users Posts: 960 ✭✭✭Conchir


    $_12.JPG

    I use those Typhoon boots, they're very warm and have plenty of grip. Might be worth checking out if you do go down the dinghy boots route.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    For those looking for thermal layers....

    My pal (who is permanently frozen!) had a top on today made by this crowd

    http://eskeez.co.uk/

    She reckoned it was the best thing EVER! I'd never heard of them, but it certainly looked and felt very cosy.

    Having said that - what a lovely (if a bit grey) day today :D


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Stheno


    Hmm I think I might die of miserliness as the cost of those is shocking though they look good.

    Having had a not freezing weekend with over 12 hours of sailing last weekend, I'm giving the Dunnes Japanese thermals a trial this weekend for €28


    If they don't do the job, I'm off to your mates site,

    If they can do, you can gloat :D


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  • Registered Users Posts: 714 ✭✭✭ValerieR


    I have these YBC neoprene lined boots - they are super comfy and warm :)


    yachtbootblue.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Stheno wrote: »
    Hmm I think I might die of miserliness as the cost of those is shocking though they look good.

    Having had a not freezing weekend with over 12 hours of sailing last weekend, I'm giving the Dunnes Japanese thermals a trial this weekend for €28


    If they don't do the job, I'm off to your mates site,

    If they can do, you can gloat :D

    They are a bit on the pricey side, but my pal (who's as skinny as a rake with no built-in insulation whatsoever, unlike myself :D) swore by the top - and it looked and felt fab (the bit I grabbed anyway!).

    My icebreaker heavy merino wool layer cost an absolute bomb at the time as well (but I needed it RIGHT THEN for some big offshore race, couldn't wait for a sale) and is still one of the best purchases I ever made, ever. You might find some bargains post-Christmas if you keep your eyes peeled. (and you might need to - if you think Turkey Shoot sailing is cold, wait till February and the Spring Chicken when you're washing ice and snow off the decks :eek:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,832 ✭✭✭Alkers


    ValerieR wrote: »
    I have these YBC neoprene lined boots - they are super comfy and warm :)


    yachtbootblue.jpg

    Where'd you pick them up? They look the business!


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,006 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    ValerieR wrote: »
    I have these YBC neoprene lined boots - they are super comfy and warm :)

    I'd imagine they might be a bit sweaty and stinky. No?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 714 ✭✭✭ValerieR


    Simona1986 wrote: »
    Where'd you pick them up? They look the business!

    Bought them online from the UK a couple of years ago.
    I'd imagine they might be a bit sweaty and stinky. No?

    Mine are not stinky but I think I don't have particularly sweaty feet :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,006 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    ValerieR wrote: »
    Bought them online from the UK a couple of years ago.



    Mine are not stinky but I think I don't have particularly sweaty feet :D

    My breathable sailing boots have a neoprene cuff and that part of my calf get all sweaty!:o


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,054 ✭✭✭✭neris


    Cant beat a good pair of dubarry boots


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    neris wrote: »
    Cant beat a good pair of dubarry boots
    +1

    Although, the soles on my current ones - which look absolutely fine - are gone totally slippy, it's like being on a skating rink on a wooden deck, and not much better on plastic ones. Think they might be going on a little holiday to Ballinasloe for re-soling in the New Year.....


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 22,584 CMod ✭✭✭✭Steve


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    +1

    Although, the soles on my current ones - which look absolutely fine - are gone totally slippy, it's like being on a skating rink on a wooden deck, and not much better on plastic ones. Think they might be going on a little holiday to Ballinasloe for re-soling in the New Year.....

    Not many people know you can do that, and it's way cheaper than new boots but just as good. Get them to do the lining as well, won't cost much extra.

    It's like the old factory worker once said: "I've had this same sweeping brush for twenty years now, it's had six new heads and three new handles but apart from that it's as good as new" :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Steve wrote: »
    Not many people know you can do that, and it's way cheaper than new boots but just as good. Get them to do the lining as well, won't cost much extra.

    It's like the old factory worker once said: "I've had this same sweeping brush for twenty years now, it's had six new heads and three new handles but apart from that it's as good as new" :D

    It's finding a gap where I don't need them for sailing is the problem!

    My sister had it done at the start of this year, and it was a total bargain. Effectively new boots for 60 quid (I think, don't quote me on that :D)


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 22,584 CMod ✭✭✭✭Steve


    It's probably the most important bit of kit you'll need for sailing, bar a lifejacket, so a second pair would be well worth the investment at some point (Christmas is coming etc.. ;))

    I have one pair I paid full price for and a backup pair I got donkeys years ago when they still sold the 'seconds' from the factory shop (not any more sadly, they moved production to Spain afaik).


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Steve wrote: »
    It's probably the most important bit of kit you'll need for sailing, bar a lifejacket, so a second pair would be well worth the investment at some point (Christmas is coming etc.. ;))

    I have one pair I paid full price for and a backup pair I got donkeys years ago when they still sold the 'seconds' from the factory shop (not any more sadly, they moved production to Spain afaik).

    Seconds still available in the shop in Ballinasloe at knockdown prices - just not the brown and brown ones which I love, so I'm holding out in hope of a mega-sale somewhere, sometime.

    Last time I was there they had some of the all blue ones (their "latest model"), and I think some of the brown and blue ones (they all have names, none of which I can remember just now I'm afraid!)

    I originally had a brown and blue pair, which I foolishly donated to a pal who was new to boating - won't be doing that again, I can tell you!


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 22,584 CMod ✭✭✭✭Steve


    Wow that's good to know. I thought you couldn't get them anymore.

    For anyone else reading, there's normally absolutely nothing wrong with the 'seconds' bar maybe a blemish in the leather. Not a problem really because you're not a 'real' sailor unless you have tatty salt stained boots :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,354 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Steve wrote: »
    Wow that's good to know. I thought you couldn't get them anymore.

    For anyone else reading, there's normally absolutely nothing wrong with the 'seconds' bar maybe a blemish in the leather. Not a problem really because you're not a 'real' sailor unless you have tatty salt stained boots :D

    Yes, production has been outsourced to somewhere cheaper (and probably warmer!) but they still get supplies of "seconds" (which there is nothing at all wrong with as Steve said! just not fit for full-price sale in a shop) - not so many sailing boots these days unfortunately, but still if you can find a pair in your size, an excellent bargain to be had.


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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Stheno


    They have the black Newport boots in Ballinasloe @ €150, rang them to ask :)

    No time to go there at the moment though :)

    I did try to try on the blue/brown, and brown/brown one, but my feet have high arches, so they will not fit!


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,054 ✭✭✭✭neris


    Wearing Non brown dubarry is sacrilegious. If their not brown they look like musto, henri lloyd or some other dubarry copy. Sailing boot snobbery at its highest


  • Registered Users Posts: 334 ✭✭Mahogany Gaspipe


    Anybody recommending dubarrys sailing boots isn't working on the foredeck!

    They are way over priced and will leak after any manner of a competitive racing season; but admittedly are stylish.
    The fastnet was their best boot by far but for some bizarre reason isn't in production anymore.
    I replaced a well worn pair of fastnets with a pair lahinch runners that fell apart after two regattas; which I got replaced without any hassle for pair of newport boots; however the cut is so low they're practically useless on the bow.

    I now just go without socks and a decent pair of Henri Lloyd trainers.

    Most boots are useless on the bow; however these boots are as good as whats out there, pricey though and way to bulky for me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,054 ✭✭✭✭neris


    Gave up foredeck few years ago but i did wear dubarrys then n got few seasons out of my 1st pair but ended up with them leaking on a wet round ireland. One thing i did learn is that while the dry salty patches that appear on them look good in the bar it kills them. I think in general alot of the kags, jackets, bottoms and boots have a very short life now a days.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Stheno


    neris wrote: »
    Wearing Non brown dubarry is sacrilegious. If their not brown they look like musto, henri lloyd or some other dubarry copy. Sailing boot snobbery at its highest

    I lolled, reminded me of all the slagging people got when they bought salopettes being sold in Howth to raise funds for charity, they are baby blue!

    Looks like my future may be as aforementioned bowman for the time being! I'll soon be able to balance on a sixpence :D


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 22,584 CMod ✭✭✭✭Steve


    Being a bowman is probably the hardest, most important and yet most unappreciated job on the boat.

    For the most part you have to anticipate what the execs at the back are going to do - and do it without them telling you. Even if they do tell you, you can't hear them because of the wind.
    Woe betide you if you set the kite up on the wrong side (even though they whispered it amongst themselves, you are expected to know anyway..). They don't care that you are struggling to clip a pole to the mast with an 80m2 full kite on the end of it to the mast that basically weighs the same as a small hippo because the lad on the sheet won't spill in case he to so a bit of winding after you get it set....

    /rant.

    I feel your pain Stheno, been there done that. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,957 ✭✭✭miss no stars


    Steve wrote: »
    Being a bowman is probably the hardest, most important and yet most unappreciated job on the boat.

    For the most part you have to anticipate what the execs at the back are going to do - and do it without them telling you. Even if they do tell you, you can't hear them because of the wind.
    Woe betide you if you set the kite up on the wrong side (even though they whispered it amongst themselves, you are expected to know anyway..). They don't care that you are struggling to clip a pole to the mast with an 80m2 full kite on the end of it to the mast that basically weighs the same as a small hippo because the lad on the sheet won't spill in case he to so a bit of winding after you get it set....

    /rant.

    I feel your pain Stheno, been there done that. :)

    Nah, that prize goes to the job of combined pit and masthead. Shouted at from both ends of the boat, have to anticipate the actions of both ends, do upwards of three things at once and often some contortion to allow the should-be-impossible multitasking. Plus, it's as hard wearing as bow is on gear and has most of the heavy pulling involved. I did bow a few times on the boat where i did pit, was positively chilled compared to pit!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,108 ✭✭✭pedroeibar1


    neris wrote: »
    Wearing Non brown dubarry is sacrilegious. If their not brown they look like musto, henri lloyd or some other dubarry copy. Sailing boot snobbery at its highest

    Historically wrong there. Dunlops were the first, had both long and short sailing boots in navy. Then they introduced yellow and green ones (hence the 'yellow / green welly brigade') and later on a white :eek: version. H Lloyd had something similar in navy & blue. Both were slow to adopt hi-tech materials and that led to the launch of Musto gear (Peter Musto was a keen sailor and was fed up with the quality of the gear on the market.) When he took up shooting he moved into that sector for the same reasons with a shooting range. Prior to that Barbour's waxed jacket as the statement. Dubarry was a simple shoe manufacturer with one of its range being a copy of 'Docksiders'. The adoption of Doobs by every schoolgirl in the country led to the survival of the business. Their leather shooting boots came first, then the sailing version, both many years later than the competition.
    Pedro, sartorially correct when at sea and in the field:P:D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,108 ✭✭✭pedroeibar1


    Nah, that prize goes to the job of combined pit and masthead.
    Steve wrote: »
    Being a bowman is probably the hardest, most important and yet most unappreciated job on the boat.
    I don’t agree with either of you. The hardest job by far is that of the person holding the stick/wheel.
    There are idiots up front who have no idea of what they are doing, they forget that by clustering up there for an age they’re digging in the bow, destroying the airflow in the most important part of the forward triangle and blocking the view. After ignoring your command of ‘Pole to port’, they hold a convention on which is the easiest side and fail to realise that they are slowing down the boat and never see the overtaking yacht that will screw you up at the mark with a cry of ‘Mast Abeam!’ Anyway, why bother with a discussion when it’s always put up on the wrong side? Not only that, they inevitably forget a genoa sheet left under the topping lift, wrong side of the downhaul or wrap the guy or halyard around the forestay, all of which will cause havoc at the gybe and necessitate lour instruction (very tiring, that.)

    As for the gorillas on the grinders or sheets, they never do it fast enough, have no idea of what a ‘snatch’ is and take an age to undo a riding turn which they cause always at the most inappropriate moments.

    Navigators are just as bad, they never know where they are and inevitably stab a finger at a chart and say ‘We’re here’ when you really know that we could not be and they do that act to hide the fact that they have no idea of where they are and need to get you out of the way so they can concentrate and play with their gadgets to find out.

    Forget tacticians - a total waste of space, with their ‘Hmms, did not expect that headland to influence the windshift by that much’ or the inevitable ‘’Hmmm, the tide seems to turn much earlier than it should out here!’

    Cooks cannot serve a properly hot coffee and even when they manage to pour something they cannot do so without slopping it all over both you and the deck, and that is only on the few occasions when they are not too sea-sick to go below.

    Personally, I believe every helm should be equipped with a megaphone and a whip with a long reach.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 334 ✭✭Mahogany Gaspipe


    I don’t agree with either of you. The hardest job by far is that of the person holding the stick/wheel.
    There are idiots up front who have no idea of what they are doing, they forget that by clustering up there for an age they’re digging in the bow, destroying the airflow in the most important part of the forward triangle and blocking the view. After ignoring your command of ‘Pole to port’, they hold a convention on which is the easiest side and fail to realise that they are slowing down the boat and never see the overtaking yacht that will screw you up at the mark with a cry of ‘Mast Abeam!’ Anyway, why bother with a discussion when it’s always put up on the wrong side? Not only that, they inevitably forget a genoa sheet left under the topping lift, wrong side of the downhaul or wrap the guy or halyard around the forestay, all of which will cause havoc at the gybe and necessitate lour instruction (very tiring, that.)

    As for the gorillas on the grinders or sheets, they never do it fast enough, have no idea of what a ‘snatch’ is and take an age to undo a riding turn which they cause always at the most inappropriate moments.

    Navigators are just as bad, they never know where they are and inevitably stab a finger at a chart and say ‘We’re here’ when you really know that we could not be and they do that act to hide the fact that they have no idea of where they are and need to get you out of the way so they can concentrate and play with their gadgets to find out.

    Forget tacticians - a total waste of space, with their ‘Hmms, did not expect that headland to influence the windshift by that much’ or the inevitable ‘’Hmmm, the tide seems to turn much earlier than it should out here!’

    Cooks cannot serve a properly hot coffee and even when they manage to pour something they cannot do so without slopping it all over both you and the deck, and that is only on the few occasions when they are not too sea-sick to go below.

    Personally, I believe every helm should be equipped with a megaphone and a whip with a long reach.
    Sounds like someone wasn't finishing on the podium to offend last season!

    Last season I was part of a relatively successful racing campaign across all the major regatta, nations and whatnot (Only once outside top three overall in our class).

    I'm moving up to Dublin in May.
    If you (or indeed any other skipper) have, or expect next season to have, the same level of success and are in need of a decent Bowman let me know.


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