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Boating chit chat thread.

  • #1
    Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 50,848 mod Stheno


    Asked Fergalb why there was no such concept, and he encouraged me to start such a thread so here we go :)

    I'd intend it (with the support of the mods) to be for random questions observations that maybe don't need an entire thread but a few posts might answer queries.

    So I'll start it off as I'm a fair newbie.

    I was reading the daily mail (I know!!!!) about the Costa Concordia being salvaged, and costing €500 million to do so, and then going for scrap.

    Is there a rule/sailing/boating regulation that says you are responsible for the salvage of a boat in any/certain circumstances?

    I'm curious as to how the company are spending this money to salvage the boat, and imagining it has to be due to regulation?


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Comments



  • Kudos for this.. off topic and randomness are good :D

    According to internet forum norms, it may also lead to comradery and beer.. also good.. :cool:


    Up with this sort of thing... :D




  • Steve wrote: »
    Kudos for this.. off topic and randomness are good :D

    According to internet forum norms, it may also lead to comradery and beer.. also good.. :cool:


    Up with this sort of thing... :D

    Hmmmmm, on the subject of beer, might beer lead to people discovering opportunities to crew/find crew? As non member crew, I find people don't respond to ads and it's about who you get to know, and I've been fortunate to get to know people, and to crew with missnostarrs on here who is probably the best instructor I have come across, I have learned more from her on pure sailing technique than anyone else.

    I'm doing basic skills this weekend, but the wind forecast for sunday is rubbish for people learning in a topaz, so I suspect that will be cancelled

    I'll then end up whitesailing on Sunday which will be fun (Not as much as on missnostarrs squib) but fun.

    I realised recently that I love sailing when I went out in heavy winds and went wooohoooo rather than feeling I was going to die.

    I'm addictted, but what about that salvage?


    Are they obliged to do it?




  • And are there enough of us in Dublin for an initial meet up? And would you be on for it?




  • id say it was joint insurance / owners agreement to get it out of there as its so close to shore




  • Good idea on the "chit chat" thread :-)

    Re. the Concordia wreck .... it seems that it must be removed (logically) if a threat to navigation or/and environment. There seems to be a Convention in existence. I found this on the www : http://www.steamshipmutual.com/publications/Articles/Wreck1007.html

    Will they bring it to shore somewhere to be dismantled or will they just sink it somewhere, away from this small picturesque/touristic island, though?


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  • Chit chat about boats that will never work for me, Chit chat about boats in a pub now your just asking for trouble :D
    I hope to do the first test run of the new boat next friday at wineport on lough Ree "about an hour from Dublin" if anyone is around your more than welcome to join me for a pint in-between testing or to help me drown my sorrows if everything goes pear shaped :eek:




    .




  • ValerieR wrote: »
    Good idea on the "chit chat" thread :-)

    Re. the Concordia wreck .... it seems that it must be removed (logically) if a threat to navigation or/and environment. There seems to be a Convention in existence. I found this on the www : http://www.steamshipmutual.com/publications/Articles/Wreck1007.html

    Will they bring it to shore somewhere to be dismantled or will they just sink it somewhere, away from this small picturesque/touristic island, though?

    Its been broken up on site. Cut into pieces slowly being taken apart.




  • Is there an autumn series going on dun laoghaire over the next few weeks? Having a look at hyc autumn league entry list theres only a few boats from dun lsoghaire entered. I realise that very few boats go the other way when theres events in dl.




  • neris wrote: »
    Its been broken up on site. Cut into pieces slowly being taken apart.


    no, its not,

    http://www.shipwrecklog.com/log/category/grounding/costa-concordia/

    its being pulled upright then re floated with containers attached to the side, then towed to a near by ship yard




  • neris wrote: »
    Is there an autumn series going on dun laoghaire over the next few weeks? Having a look at hyc autumn league entry list theres only a few boats from dun lsoghaire entered. I realise that very few boats go the other way when theres events in dl.

    I think the summer series for DL goes on for a few more weeks, so that's possibly why


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  • There's two more Saturdays left in the DBSC series, but the DMYC September Series is under way http://dmyc.ie/afloat/september-series/.

    Then once that finishes, the Turkey Shoot gets going in mid-October I think - Sunday mornings until mid-December. Great fun!

    ETA - just looked at the September Series results - there ain't a whole lot of boats in it this year! So I doubt that's the reason for low entries in Howth.....




  • neris wrote: »
    Is there an autumn series going on dun laoghaire over the next few weeks? Having a look at hyc autumn league entry list theres only a few boats from dun lsoghaire entered. I realise that very few boats go the other way when theres events in dl.

    Might be something to do with what's the point of moving the boat and not having it at their convenience all week (or sailing over and back every week) just to do a 45 minute race...




  • Actually ... the raising of the Costa Concordia can be followed live from http://live.reuters.com/Event/Raising_the_Costa_Concordia/89428066?ss=1

    Gigantic undertaking !




  • I couldn't get the Reuters link to work, but Channel 4 have it live too

    Link here




  • Pete67 wrote: »
    I couldn't get the Reuters link to work, but Channel 4 have it live too

    Link here

    Thank you for the new link Pete67 - The Reuters link stopped working when it got dark.

    PS - Time lapse of this afternoon's progress




  • Jeez I'd a great sailing week this week, got out training on a squib and the evil skipper forced me to take the help, and I think I did ok (well, we didn't capsize :D)




  • Hi

    Just started sailing (crewing) this year and having a blast. Collected the boat in Southampton in March and have been sailing in the dbsc white sails Saturday series, a couple of regettas in Dublin Bay, and most recently Greystones. We plan to sail over the winter in whitesails and may move to cruisers 1 next year. We need more crew but then who doesn't:-)

    There is an informal get together in the NYC after racing this Saturday. Anyone else going along or even racing?

    Anyone doing the race around Kish Lighthouse on Sunday?

    Beer sounds good, and even better if we got some crew from it, even though it sounds like shanghaiing. As a new boat and crew the opportunity to meet and talk about sailing, rig setup, tactics etc would be great.




  • Vexorg wrote: »
    Hi

    Just started sailing (crewing) this year and having a blast. Collected the boat in Southampton in March and have been sailing in the dbsc white sails Saturday series, a couple of regettas in Dublin Bay, and most recently Greystones. We plan to sail over the winter in whitesails and may move to cruisers 1 next year. We need more crew but then who doesn't:-)

    There is an informal get together in the NYC after racing this Saturday. Anyone else going along or even racing?

    Anyone doing the race around Kish Lighthouse on Sunday?

    Beer sounds good, and even better if we got some crew from it, even though it sounds like shanghaiing. As a new boat and crew the opportunity to meet and talk about sailing, rig setup, tactics etc would be great.

    Hi,

    is the boat yours or a friend's? I'm not doing any of the above events (I sail out of Howth) but it's great to hear of people getting into it and enjoying it. Trying to move to IRC1 is a great plan, gives something to work towards. :)




  • Hi,

    is the boat yours or a friend's? I'm not doing any of the above events (I sail out of Howth) but it's great to hear of people getting into it and enjoying it. Trying to move to IRC1 is a great plan, gives something to work towards. :)

    It is my brothers boat, and this year has been a huge learning experience for me. I want to do some more training in smaller boats, to get a better feel for sailing and just to understand the process a little better.

    I kind of wish I had started sailing years ago.


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  • Vexorg wrote: »
    It is my brothers boat, and this year has been a huge learning experience for me. I want to do some more training in smaller boats, to get a better feel for sailing and just to understand the process a little better.

    I kind of wish I had started sailing years ago.

    Ha, meet your sister :) I wish I'd started it years ago too!

    I know you are sailing on a big boat, but I've found I've learned most, and gotten most confidence from doing dinghy courses, I did basic skills last week, and at the end of day 1 (still have a day to go) in a topaz, because it was up to me to anticipate the wind,, and my movements, I was so much more confident, and we'd a few races to end the day and I enjoyed them. And theory wise, it all just made so much more sense!

    I'd recommend a course in a dinghy for that reason :)

    Great to hear you are enjoying it :)




  • Stheno wrote: »

    I'd recommend a course in a dinghy for that reason

    I’m not at all in favour of this dinghy stuff as a precursor to big boat sailing. Firstly, little boats require you to get your feet wet because they have to be manhandled down a slanty bit of slippy concrete. On a keelboat you simply step aboard, the boatman having brought you there and announcing 'Here we ar, sir.' Secondly, on a dinghy there is nowhere comfortable to sit down, nor even a place to lean against. Keelboats have cushions, cockpits and even backrests. Thirdly, little boats handle differently, lean over far too much (and can even topple over) and sometimes require uncouth acrobatic antics such as looking at the helmsman while standing outside the boat supported by a length of wire. Finally, on a dinghy there is nowhere to keep ones bottle of gin and even if you bring a readymix with you there is absolutely not one single flat surface upon which to place one’s glass. Personally, I’m an advocate of big boats, the bigger the better and now I will not put a foot aboard any craft that does not have the onboard facility of producing icecubes. Dinghies, forsooth.;)




  • I’m not at all in favour of this dinghy stuff as a precursor to big boat sailing. Firstly, little boats require you to get your feet wet because they have to be manhandled down a slanty bit of slippy concrete. On a keelboat you simply step aboard, the boatman having brought you there and announcing 'Here we ar, sir.' Secondly, on a dinghy there is nowhere comfortable to sit down, nor even a place to lean against. Keelboats have cushions, cockpits and even backrests. Thirdly, little boats handle differently, lean over far too much (and can even topple over) and sometimes require uncouth acrobatic antics such as looking at the helmsman while standing outside the boat supported by a length of wire. Finally, on a dinghy there is nowhere to keep ones bottle of gin and even if you bring a readymix with you there is absolutely not one single flat surface upon which to place one’s glass. Personally, I’m an advocate of big boats, the bigger the better and now I will not put a foot aboard any craft that does not have the onboard facility of producing icecubes. Dinghies, forsooth.;)

    I raced in a Cork week a few years ago in white sail and we had our own chef on board from a city centre restaurant rustling up canapés and serving them along with champagne at critical points like just after a mark rounding(true story).

    It’s really the only civilised way to race: Spinnakers pfft, sandwiches and tea pfft. I echo your thoughts completely!




  • some of us like all that manhandling, getting our feet wet and the constant threat of imminent immersion ;)
    (and I have a most convenient little dry bag for storing the essentials like gin and jelly sweets)

    If you don't want to go to the extreme of dinghy sailing (and I can understand why you might not want to, especially in winter in Ireland), then I'd recommend a few sessions in the smallest keelboat you can get your hands on.

    The smaller the boat and the fewer the crew, the more you'll get a feel for what's really going on. A small keelboat will give you much of the dinghy experience without the discomfort and risk. 1720s are a particular favourite of mine, though I don't have much experience in boats around that size.

    That said, when I first started (in a 1720) I thought the dinghy sailors were bat**** crazy and was very enthusiastic about crewing for larger boats at every opportunity. Now, given a choice, I'll take a dinghy any day of the week.




  • murphym7 wrote: »
    It’s really the only civilised way to race: Spinnakers pfft, sandwiches and tea pfft. I echo your thoughts completely!

    But spinnakers make a lovely backdrop to the photos of the outing. Just cut to the chase and bring some paid crew to sail the boat for you and be done with all that pulling and winching business.




  • I’m not at all in favour of this dinghy stuff as a precursor to big boat sailing. Firstly, little boats require you to get your feet wet because they have to be manhandled down a slanty bit of slippy concrete. On a keelboat you simply step aboard, the boatman having brought you there and announcing 'Here we ar, sir.' Secondly, on a dinghy there is nowhere comfortable to sit down, nor even a place to lean against. Keelboats have cushions, cockpits and even backrests. Thirdly, little boats handle differently, lean over far too much (and can even topple over) and sometimes require uncouth acrobatic antics such as looking at the helmsman while standing outside the boat supported by a length of wire. Finally, on a dinghy there is nowhere to keep ones bottle of gin and even if you bring a readymix with you there is absolutely not one single flat surface upon which to place one’s glass. Personally, I’m an advocate of big boats, the bigger the better and now I will not put a foot aboard any craft that does not have the onboard facility of producing icecubes. Dinghies, forsooth.;)

    Have you ever tried a catamaran :p

    And what about drysails? :eek:




  • Stheno wrote: »
    Have you ever tried a catamaran :p
    Yes, I sailed a Hobie a few times on my own when on my honeymoon. Great fun and on the first really windy day one of the Hobie rental staff offered to crew if I wanted to go out. It was exhilarating, but I could not repeat the exercise as she was extremely pretty and went topless.




  • But spinnakers make a lovely backdrop to the photos of the outing. Just cut to the chase and bring some paid crew to sail the boat for you and be done with all that pulling and winching business.

    Quite. Which was the reason why the Royal Alfred YC was founded and why that DBSC and waterfront clubs had (have?) a rule that not more than one paid hand was allowed onboard.




  • ...and why that DBSC and waterfront clubs had (have?) a rule that not more than one paid hand was allowed onboard.
    That's an ISAF racing rule more than anything else. Rule 79. Most amateur events limit sailors above Cat 1 in all classes except zero / super zero.


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  • Steve wrote: »
    That's an ISAF racing rule more than anything else. Rule 79. Most amateur events limit sailors above Cat 1 in all classes except zero / super zero.

    Thanks Steve. Had a look at that, nightmare stuff, terrible what money does to a sport. My last racing (as a helm) was under IYRU and back then a protest in Cruisers I or II in Dublin Bay was really unusual and only for the most serious of occurrences. The offender usually resigned rather than put everyone through the hassle of a meeting.


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