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Boating chit chat thread.

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Comments

  • #2


    Right lads, my anniversary with the OH is coming up, and I'm requesting knee pads and an auto inflating lifejacket as gifts.

    I was out with someone yesterday who had said jacket which had a light on it that indicated if the battery was charged, anyone know what I am talking about?


  • #2


    Unfortunately I can't help, but that does sound cool.

    I found a hole in my boat today, below the water line :( Fun Winter ahead.


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    Right lads, my anniversary with the OH is coming up, and I'm requesting knee pads and an auto inflating lifejacket as gifts.

    I was out with someone yesterday who had said jacket which had a light on it that indicated if the battery was charged, anyone know what I am talking about?

    Mine has a sort of locator light to make you easier to see in the water but I haven't heard of what you've described. I've only ever used auto inflators that are mechanically triggered.. They usially have brightlu coloured plastic attachments to show that they havent been fired. I've never come across an electronically triggered jacket yet, is there anything else identifiable on it?

    One thing I would advise about them is to avoid jackets with folded corners - they wear through at fold points very quickly. Go for something rounded the whole way around.


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    Right lads, my anniversary with the OH is coming up, and I'm requesting knee pads and an auto inflating lifejacket as gifts.

    I was out with someone yesterday who had said jacket which had a light on it that indicated if the battery was charged, anyone know what I am talking about?

    I think you have confused a couple of issues here - the jackets with a light have the latter as a location indicator at night. AFAIK they do not have a battery but have a wetcell unit that is activated when immersed in salt water. I would not bother with a light unless I would be doing night-time offshore stuff.

    There are different 'triggers' for auto-inflate but the key thing is to change the compressed air cylinder every season. I'm not a big fan of them (having once had a bad and very wet experience with one) and prefer those that inflate with a toggle. Some have a plastic clip indicator to show the bottle has not been used - a visual inspection is better and almost as easy.)


  • #2


    I think you have confused a couple of issues here - the jackets with a light have the latter as a location indicator at night. AFAIK they do not have a battery but have a wetcell unit that is activated when immersed in salt water. I would not bother with a light unless I would be doing night-time offshore stuff.

    There are different 'triggers' for auto-inflate but the key thing is to change the compressed air cylinder every season. I'm not a big fan of them (having once had a bad and very wet experience with one) and prefer those that inflate with a toggle. Some have a plastic clip indicator to show the bottle has not been used - a visual inspection is better and almost as easy.)

    Agree that the "all ok" (I'm sure there's a proper name for it!) indicator is unlikely to be lit. And that you don't really need a light unless you're doing night sailing/racing.

    Not sure it's necessary to actually change the gas cylinder every year? You can detach it, examine it, weigh it (the weight is stamped on it) to make sure it hasn't leaked any of its contents, and reattach it making sure it's firmly screwed in.

    You should really get a lifejacet serviced every year, or else learn how to do it yourself.

    There are a number of different firing mechanisms, and I think they all have good/bad points - I recently bought a new liftjacket (which I hate, so I won't share details!) and Viking were very helpful in describing each. Any decent chandlers will be a good source of advice about this. But I would also agree that you need to have a manual toggle as well - just to be sure to be sure!

    And the last thing - bet you never knew lifejackets could be so complicated! - is get one with a crotch strap - or fit one to the one you do get. This is a big bugbear of mine, having done a sea survival course and having been in the water with an inflated lifejacket - if it's not strapped snug around the chest, and with a crotch strap secure, then it will more than likely assist in drowning you.

    There endeth the lecture.

    :D


  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Agree that the "all ok" (I'm sure there's a proper name for it!) indicator is unlikely to be lit. And that you don't really need a light unless you're doing night sailing/racing.

    Not sure it's necessary to actually change the gas cylinder every year? You can detach it, examine it, weigh it (the weight is stamped on it) to make sure it hasn't leaked any of its contents, and reattach it making sure it's firmly screwed in.

    You should really get a lifejacet serviced every year, or else learn how to do it yourself.

    There are a number of different firing mechanisms, and I think they all have good/bad points - I recently bought a new liftjacket (which I hate, so I won't share details!) and Viking were very helpful in describing each. Any decent chandlers will be a good source of advice about this. But I would also agree that you need to have a manual toggle as well - just to be sure to be sure!

    And the last thing - bet you never knew lifejackets could be so complicated! - is get one with a crotch strap - or fit one to the one you do get. This is a big bugbear of mine, having done a sea survival course and having been in the water with an inflated lifejacket - if it's not strapped snug around the chest, and with a crotch strap secure, then it will more than likely assist in drowning you.

    There endeth the lecture.

    :D

    And make sure the crotch/thigh straps are comfy and don't affect movement. Should be able to run around and get up and down steps unimpeded.

    Might not be a bad idea to have a dedicated lifejacket thread for sharing wisdom and reviews.


  • #2


    I did hear of a new electric triggering lifejacket called an EBBS that allows a person to fall into the water without it going off giving the person a chance to swim back to the boat it will only go off if the person sinks to a preset depth, I'm not sure it's on the market yet and think it only had a short battery life.




    .


  • #2


    Mine has a sort of locator light to make you easier to see in the water but I haven't heard of what you've described. I've only ever used auto inflators that are mechanically triggered.. They usially have brightlu coloured plastic attachments to show that they havent been fired. I've never come across an electronically triggered jacket yet, is there anything else identifiable on it?

    One thing I would advise about them is to avoid jackets with folded corners - they wear through at fold points very quickly. Go for something rounded the whole way around.

    I think it might have been like this, which is advertised as having a viewing window to see the mechanism state, and looks like the one I saw irl. It also has a toggle for manual inflation

    http://www.marineparts.ie/safety/lifejackets/lifejackets-en/seago-180n-auto-lifejacket-with-hood-light-harness-and-strap.html

    Yeah I've noticed the ones with triangular folds tend to wear very quickly.

    Am definitely getting one with crotch straps, and going to spend time trimming it so I don't have excess bits of straps going everywhere, given that they are designed to fit most sizes, I find I've metres of excess strap hanging about!


  • #2


    Looks like a good lifejacket. Has the essentials for daytime coastal stuff (it is a lifejacket and has a crotch strap) and then has the nice to have/essential items for all other conditions such as the harness, spray hood and light. All of them should have a manual inflation trigger plus a top up valve.

    On a side note, I'd be inclined to not trim the ends - they're easily dealt with by folding them up and putting an elastic band around or just tucking them in. Trimming and then keeping the ends sealed and secure would just be another thing to maintain. There's also the issue of being a different size in summer vs winter (or even in summer during night vs day). As an example, during the day I might have trousers, tshirt and fleece on with salopettes and cag/offshore jacket on; at night I might have trousers, tracksuit bottoms and salopettes on bottom, then 2 tshirts, base layer fleece, second fleece, snug jacket plus offshore jacket on top (can you tell that I feel the cold?!). When you're that bulked up you'll a) need more eh, scope, in the straps all round than during the day and b ) need another little extra bit as you're a bit michelin man by that point and actually getting stuff on and adjusting it requires a little bit more length in the straps.


  • #2


    Looks like a good lifejacket. Has the essentials for daytime coastal stuff (it is a lifejacket and has a crotch strap) and then has the nice to have/essential items for all other conditions such as the harness, spray hood and light. All of them should have a manual inflation trigger plus a top up valve.

    On a side note, I'd be inclined to not trim the ends - they're easily dealt with by folding them up and putting an elastic band around or just tucking them in. Trimming and then keeping the ends sealed and secure would just be another thing to maintain. There's also the issue of being a different size in summer vs winter (or even in summer during night vs day). As an example, during the day I might have trousers, tshirt and fleece on with salopettes and cag/offshore jacket on; at night I might have trousers, tracksuit bottoms and salopettes on bottom, then 2 tshirts, base layer fleece, second fleece, snug jacket plus offshore jacket on top (can you tell that I feel the cold?!). When you're that bulked up you'll a) need more eh, scope, in the straps all round than during the day and b ) need another little extra bit as you're a bit michelin man by that point and actually getting stuff on and adjusting it requires a little bit more length in the straps.


    Good points, thanks for taking the time to post that. You are dead right too, I've been using borrowed automatics up till now so never thought of elastics etc

    I too am a feeler of the cold, can't abide being cold :)


  • #2


    Looks like a good lifejacket. Has the essentials for daytime coastal stuff (it is a lifejacket and has a crotch strap) and then has the nice to have/essential items for all other conditions such as the harness, spray hood and light. All of them should have a manual inflation trigger plus a top up valve.

    On a side note, I'd be inclined to not trim the ends - they're easily dealt with by folding them up and putting an elastic band around or just tucking them in. Trimming and then keeping the ends sealed and secure would just be another thing to maintain. There's also the issue of being a different size in summer vs winter (or even in summer during night vs day). As an example, during the day I might have trousers, tshirt and fleece on with salopettes and cag/offshore jacket on; at night I might have trousers, tracksuit bottoms and salopettes on bottom, then 2 tshirts, base layer fleece, second fleece, snug jacket plus offshore jacket on top (can you tell that I feel the cold?!). When you're that bulked up you'll a) need more eh, scope, in the straps all round than during the day and b ) need another little extra bit as you're a bit michelin man by that point and actually getting stuff on and adjusting it requires a little bit more length in the straps.

    +1 to all of the above! With bells (and thermals, and multiple fleeces) on!!

    Also, just because it's rounded, doesn't mean that the lifejacket bladder won't develop a fault... I maintained my previous one (similar to the one you've posted) meticulously, and still found a leak in it at the start of this season - regular checks are a must, whether by you or by someone qualified/knowledgable about lifejackets.


  • #2


    My beloved Oakleys went to their watery grave today :(

    The one day that I'd no retainer band on them as mine broke, and I decided to take a chance.

    Mental note:
    1. Always keep ball of twine in car/bag.
    2. Secure twine/retainer to suit/pfd/lifejacket.


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    My beloved Oakleys went to their watery grave today :(

    The one day that I'd no retainer band on them as mine broke, and I decided to take a chance.

    Mental note:
    1. Always keep ball of twine in car/bag.
    2. Secure twine/retainer to suit/pfd/lifejacket.

    Story of my life. Cheap sunglasses ftw.


  • #2


    Story of my life. Cheap sunglasses ftw.

    Somehow, and miraculously, I've never lost a pair of sunglasses overboard. Yet :D

    Possibly because until it's practically nighttime, I just never take them off. I reckon if I dangled them off a string/retainer, I'd just smash them off something instead - they're far safer wrapped around my ears!!!

    Speaking of cheapies - I fully agree! Lidl (and possibly Aldi) occasionally do proper, really nice, fully polarised sunnies for the grand sum of a fiver - last time they were there we bought a load of them and the boat is now stuffed with spare sunglasses! Well worth keeping an eye out for - if I see them again I'll post here and we can all stock up :D


  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Somehow, and miraculously, I've never lost a pair of sunglasses overboard. Yet :D .......

    Speaking of cheapies - I fully agree! Lidl (and possibly Aldi) occasionally do proper, really nice, fully polarised sunnies for the grand sum of a fiver -

    The seabed in Dublin Bay is littered....my addition to the list - many pairs of sunglasses, one set of car keys, a v. good watch (strap pin broke), several hats, etc. A certain crew who shall remain nameless used to be greeted when coming on board with the comment 'Did you bring another winch handle?' such was his habit of dropping them over the side.

    Agreed on the Lidl glasses, very serviceable, (as are their shackles) and good value but the warp they sell is total rubbish as are their sailing oilskins.


  • #2


    There's an old nautical saying...

    "It doesn't matter how much you paid for it, it still makes the same noise when it goes over the side"

    Very true, applies to watches, sunnies, gps's, winch handles, hats, you name it.. :D


  • #2
    Serious amount of power here - crazy stuff really. Beautiful boat though.

    http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20131007-the-lamborghini-powered-boat


  • #2


    Sweet Sweet music :D




  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Somehow, and miraculously, I've never lost a pair of sunglasses overboard. Yet :D

    Possibly because until it's practically nighttime, I just never take them off. I reckon if I dangled them off a string/retainer, I'd just smash them off something instead - they're far safer wrapped around my ears!!!

    Speaking of cheapies - I fully agree! Lidl (and possibly Aldi) occasionally do proper, really nice, fully polarised sunnies for the grand sum of a fiver - last time they were there we bought a load of them and the boat is now stuffed with spare sunglasses! Well worth keeping an eye out for - if I see them again I'll post here and we can all stock up :D

    Went hunting for cheapies at the weekend and couldn't find anything that was polarised, so thanks a million for that, will keep an eye out :)

    With my pale freckly skin they help :)


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    Went hunting for cheapies at the weekend and couldn't find anything that was polarised, so thanks a million for that, will keep an eye out :)

    With my pale freckly skin they help :)

    Try TK Maxx - it's a long, random, and often fruitless exercise, but you can sometimes get real bargains there.

    Despite my endorsement of cheapies above, I actually wear (until I sit on them sometime, as I assuredly will :D) - Maui Jim's - a brand of which I'd never even heard, until a work colleague put me onto them.... they cost a fair bit, but are far and away the best sunglasses I've EVER had. The light (even in dim light or rain) is incredibly clear through them.

    http://www.mauijim.com/ho-okipa.html


  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Try TK Maxx - it's a long, random, and often fruitless exercise, but you can sometimes get real bargains there.

    Despite my endorsement of cheapies above, I actually wear (until I sit on them sometime, as I assuredly will :D) - Maui Jim's - a brand of which I'd never even heard, until a work colleague put me onto them.... they cost a fair bit, but are far and away the best sunglasses I've EVER had. The light (even in dim light or rain) is incredibly clear through them.

    http://www.mauijim.com/ho-okipa.html

    Thank you :)

    I'm going to invest in some cheapies, but for everyday sunglasses, I think I've found my friend in oakleys and a chap in ebay who makes a living out of selling genuine oakleys that are past season.

    I've a very small face, so for normal glasses I wear childrens size :pac: so finding the oakleys that fit me was like Santa coming :) I actually bought them for my OH as a present and he didn't like them as they were a bit small so I filched them :D Didn't even lose them doing anything stupid, I was out the day before without a retainer and they survived three capsizes (I was doing a course, and suffered two dreaded accidental gybes) it was something ridiculous altogether like the kicker swinging that knocked them off!

    I like the sound of the maui jims too! Gonna check those out, but cheapies on boats. Learned the watch lesson early on, when I lost a hat, realised I didn't want my plain but much loved watch suffering such a lonely death.


  • #2


    Steve wrote: »
    There's an old nautical saying...

    "It doesn't matter how much you paid for it, it still makes the same noise when it goes over the side"

    Very true, applies to watches, sunnies, gps's, winch handles, hats, you name it.. :D

    Ehhhhhh Steve, you might have forgotten the "waaaaaaah, to aaaaha feeck" wails of your fellow crew"?

    Unless of course you've now taken on the attitude of Americas cup sailors?

    "Keep going guys" (unsaid but implied, "someone else will take care of them, focus on the race")


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    Ehhhhhh Steve, you might have forgotten the "waaaaaaah, to aaaaha feeck" wails of your fellow crew"?

    Unless of course you've now taken on the attitude of Americas cup sailors?

    "Keep going guys" (unsaid but implied, "someone else will take care of them, focus on the race")
    We have a well trained crew, they know not to wail :D

    The best one ever was during a regatta on a morning race, myself and another lad were particularly green from the amount of rum the night before.
    Halfways up the second beat, he calmly looked at me and asked 'how long to the mark'.
    I looked at the GPS and replied '1m45s, no tacks'.
    He replied 'OK, permission to puke please'..
    I said 'Fine, don't be long'.

    He was back on the rail before the mark. :cool:


  • #2


    Brrrr, it was rather chilly out there today :eek:


  • #2


    Wasn't sure where to post this, so picked here :D

    http://www.rolexmiddlesearace.com/tracker/#pt

    Three Irish boats competing this year in the Middle Sea Race - Encore from Malahide, Galileo from NYC, Lilla from Cork.

    Looks like a stormer of a race this time - as opposed to the floater last time when a lot had to retire.

    I had a smidgin of a chance of taking part this time, but had to turn it down for various reasons - and am regretting it bitterly!


  • #2


    Stheno wrote: »
    Brrrr, it was rather chilly out there today :eek:

    Probably time to dust of the thermals and mid layers.


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Wasn't sure where to post this, so picked here :D

    http://www.rolexmiddlesearace.com/tracker/#pt

    Three Irish boats competing this year in the Middle Sea Race - Encore from Malahide, Galileo from NYC, Lilla from Cork.

    Looks like a stormer of a race this time - as opposed to the floater last time when a lot had to retire.

    I had a smidgin of a chance of taking part this time, but had to turn it down for various reasons - and am regretting it bitterly!

    That would be a great experience have you crewed in this race before? The tracker will not load for me in android, how are the Irish boats doing.


  • #2


    Vexorg wrote: »
    That would be a great experience have you crewed in this race before? The tracker will not load for me in android, how are the Irish boats doing.

    No - but I did Fastnets and the Round Ireland on Galileo - they had to retire from the MSR last time, so I'm willing the wind to keep up for them this time!!!

    As of the last check-in - Encore 24th, Galileo 40th in IRC4, Lilla 3rd in IRC3.

    Overall Lilla 16th, Encore 45th, Galileo 76th.

    99 started.

    I don't know anything about Lilla but good for them, Galileo need more wind!!!


  • #2


    Couldn't resist being nosey, so I googled Lilla - seems to be a high end 76' charter boat owned by two Americans (I think) based (some of the time anyway) in Cork. I'm not entirely sure the boat has ever seen Irish shores. Seems to spend most of its time in the Caribbean.

    Available according to one website for the knockdown price of $15000-$19000 per WEEK :eek:

    I'd dearly love to know who's racing her this week!!!

    Back in the real world, Encore now 28th overall, Galileo 62nd.


  • #2


    Skipper and crew listed here. Its a great looking boat.


  • #2


    Vexorg wrote: »
    Skipper and crew listed here. Its a great looking boat.

    Owner-raced then.... well good luck to them, they're doing a great job of it so far :)


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