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Improvements that are needed in GAA

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,319 ✭✭✭Al_Coholic


    what about no more than 2 or 3 men surrounding a player who has possession of the ball?

    or as they do in aussie rules..the man with possession of the ball has to release it straight away if the above happens


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,723 ✭✭✭nice_guy80


    have stadiums been mentioned yet? roofs should be put on the terraces

    the colours of the seats in croke park are discusting

    even disgusting?? the croke park vista is a bit bland alright. when the seats have to be replaced they should invest in a colour scheme

    I echo the above sentiments about terraces. I like to stand at a match. If there is a roof overhead I am more likely to attend the game. If the GAA covered some of the terraces they would get much better attendances at league games imho


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭Flukey


    Al_Coholic wrote: »
    what about no more than 2 or 3 men surrounding a player who has possession of the ball?

    or as they do in aussie rules..the man with possession of the ball has to release it straight away if the above happens

    I'd limit it to two. As for releasing the ball, when a player is surrounded he is often unable to release it, and then gets penalised for not doing so. The rule is there so.

    As for seat colours, once there are arses on them you can't see what colours they are. You won't see the one under your own arse and while there may be empty ones around you and in other areas around the ground, your main focus should be on what is happening on the pitch. Colours of seats would not worry me, but there could be a lot of improvement in the quality of seats in a lot of the grounds around the country. Major grounds still having just benches and no backs, or backless bucket seats should look at improving them no matter what colour they are.

    Covering terraces? Not a major priority. Lots of stands are open too and it is no harm. Some sugar babies can't take a drop of rain but come prepared and you'll be fine, and even if you get soaked, you'll survive. In the deluge that was the summer of 2008 two days stand out. The wet day Dublin and Tyrone played when a ribbon of lightning flashed above the Cusack Stand as the ball was thrown in and water was literally cascading down the steps of Hill 16. People survived. The other instance was the Kerry v Galway match. As half time approached, so did a large very dark cloud. The heavens opened like they never had done before. Flood warning were appearing on the electronic scoreboard, something I've never seen before or since. Jones Road was flooded. The upper decks were opened so people could move from the lower decks to dryer areas. Meanwhile, on a pitch that was just like a massive puddle the two teams served up as good a quality of football as you would see in the weather we are experiencing now. It was fantastic stuff. Afterwards we headed into town, stopping for cover a few times. When we got to the pub we were going to, there was actually water coming through the ceiling. We also heard the news that the Shelbourne v Sunderland friendly set for Tolka Park that evening had been cancelled. I though it was funny that these professionals could not play while a bunch of amateurs had served up play of the highest quality that afternoon.

    People say Hill 16 should be covered to "complete" Croke Park. One of the nice things about Croke Park, and indeed many stadiums, is that openess that we have. A completely enclosed stadium has a different character, not necessarily a better one. They feel a bit restricted and smaller than an open ground.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 Ashdoctor


    Agree totally on da posts. Also why don't all grounds take up the idea of nets all the way up above and behind the goal...sliothar would be caught in this net up to the height of the top of the posts....would solve a lot of decisions without even trying...sliothar gets caught in net and appears at the bottom of same when caught...simple technology..possibly ahead of its time!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 829 ✭✭✭smellmepower


    Flukey wrote: »
    I'd limit it to two. As for releasing the ball, when a player is surrounded he is often unable to release it, and then gets penalised for not doing so. The rule is there so.

    As for seat colours, once there are arses on them you can't see what colours they are. You won't see the one under your own arse and while there may be empty ones around you and in other areas around the ground, your main focus should be on what is happening on the pitch. Colours of seats would not worry me, but there could be a lot of improvement in the quality of seats in a lot of the grounds around the country. Major grounds still having just benches and no backs, or backless bucket seats should look at improving them no matter what colour they are.

    Covering terraces? Not a major priority. Lots of stands are open too and it is no harm. Some sugar babies can't take a drop of rain but come prepared and you'll be fine, and even if you get soaked, you'll survive. In the deluge that was the summer of 2008 two days stand out. The wet day Dublin and Tyrone played when a ribbon of lightning flashed above the Cusack Stand as the ball was thrown in and water was literally cascading down the steps of Hill 16. People survived. The other instance was the Kerry v Galway match. As half time approached, so did a large very dark cloud. The heavens opened like they never had done before. Flood warning were appearing on the electronic scoreboard, something I've never seen before or since. Jones Road was flooded. The upper decks were opened so people could move from the lower decks to dryer areas. Meanwhile, on a pitch that was just like a massive puddle the two teams served up as good a quality of football as you would see in the weather we are experiencing now. It was fantastic stuff. Afterwards we headed into town, stopping for cover a few times. When we got to the pub we were going to, there was actually water coming through the ceiling. We also heard the news that the Shelbourne v Sunderland friendly set for Tolka Park that evening had been cancelled. I though it was funny that these professionals could not play while a bunch of amateurs had served up play of the highest quality that afternoon.

    People say Hill 16 should be covered to "complete" Croke Park. One of the nice things about Croke Park, and indeed many stadiums, is that openess that we have. A completely enclosed stadium has a different character, not necessarily a better one. They feel a bit restricted and smaller than an open ground.

    Why would they run the risk of getting injured in a meaningless pre-season friendly in fairness.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 482 ✭✭oneillMan999


    Couple of thoughts..

    Do away with touching the ball on the ground, let them pick it up, it works in aussie rules and ladies football and allows the game to flow better.

    Make the ball slightly lighter to encourage more long range attempts.

    Ask Marty Duffy if he wants to keep refereeing and if he says "yes" then retire him.

    On the Dublin home game argument..
    Donegal or Kerry or Galway sit on a bus for 5 hours to get to croke park while Dublin take a leisurely half hour trip across the city for the game...noooo, no advantage there at all!!

    And yes, Croke Park is Dublins home venue. Somethin we all knew for a long time.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,631 ✭✭✭Dirty Dingus McGee


    Couple of thoughts..

    Do away with touching the ball on the ground, let them pick it up, it works in aussie rules and ladies football and allows the game to flow better.

    Make the ball slightly lighter to encourage more long range attempts.

    Ask Marty Duffy if he wants to keep refereeing and if he says "yes" then retire him.

    On the Dublin home game argument..
    Donegal or Kerry or Galway sit on a bus for 5 hours to get to croke park while Dublin take a leisurely half hour trip across the city for the game...noooo, no advantage there at all!!

    And yes, Croke Park is Dublins home venue. Somethin we all knew for a long time.

    Making the ball lighter will make long range scores more difficult and discourage long range point shooting.A lighter ball would be more difficult to control kicking from the hands and would if there was a bit of wind turn point shooting into a lottery. A lighter ball would discourage long range point shooting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 482 ✭✭oneillMan999


    Making the ball lighter will make long range scores more difficult and discourage long range point shooting.A lighter ball would be more difficult to control kicking from the hands and would if there was a bit of wind turn point shooting into a lottery. A lighter ball would discourage long range point shooting.


    Ah here i only said slightly lighter not make it a beach ball! ;-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,290 ✭✭✭Martin567


    I raised the issue of umpires two weeks ago in this thread and there were more examples today. I've just rewatched some of the Kilkenny/Cork match and the incompetence of some of those umpiring these big games is frightening. Henry Shefflin's "miss" was only halfway up the posts and clearly a point. There should be a "one strike and you're out" policy with blatant errors like this. Players are training too many hours for their whole year to be at the mercy of an incompetent who can't get the basics right.

    I feel RTE didn't help either. Talk of needing Hawkeye in Thurles is missing the point. For incidents like the one I highlighted above, Hawkeye should not be necessary. Basic vision and proper positioning are all that's needed and if they can't manage that, then they shouldn't be there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,575 ✭✭✭Mal-Adjusted


    Ashdoctor wrote: »
    Agree totally on da posts. Also why don't all grounds take up the idea of nets all the way up above and behind the goal...sliothar would be caught in this net up to the height of the top of the posts....would solve a lot of decisions without even trying...sliothar gets caught in net and appears at the bottom of same when caught...simple technology..possibly ahead of its time!

    We have this in our local grounds. A second set of posts behind the goals (painted black) with side netting connected to the goal posts and the top of the goal net. They catch the sloitar on the really tight angles, works great.

    The problem is other teams tell us that the second set of posts throws them when taking points.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,466 ✭✭✭blinding


    That Mayo v Galway match yesterday was a dirge, just awful for most of the game .

    I think that after 3 hand passes the Ball has to be kicked forward . There is too much tippy tappy in the middle third of the field and going nowhere for the sake of going nowhere .
    So after 3 hand passes or three passes that have not gone forward the Ball has to be kicked forward .
    Certainly just after 3 hand passes the ball having to be kicked forward would not be that hard to ref .


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    The ponderous attacks are the result of massed defences. Constraining the attack will just make massed defence more profitable.

    The direction of change here if one is to be made has to be around punishing over-defensiveness, not making it harder to score.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,466 ✭✭✭blinding


    keane2097 wrote: »
    The ponderous attacks are the result of massed defences. Constraining the attack will just make massed defence more profitable.

    The direction of change here if one is to be made has to be around punishing over-defensiveness, not making it harder to score.
    A way of spreading out the players would help . They are currently playing like children all bunched up .
    The idea of having to kick forward after three hand passes should be trialed in some games .
    It may spread out the players . Lets see . What we have now is a dirge .


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    blinding wrote: »
    A way of spreading out the players would help . They are currently playing like children all bunched up .
    The idea of having to kick forward after three hand passes should be trialed in some games .
    It may spread out the players . Lets see . What we have now is a dirge .

    I agree that the over-defensive games are garbage, and would be in favour of doing something to change them.

    I think mandated number of players in each half or something like that, targeted at blanket defences, is a better approach though. If you are without the ball and you know the attack are going to have to kick it whether they are in a good position to do so or not you are just going to hunker down more inside your own D and wait for them to **** it up.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,466 ✭✭✭blinding


    keane2097 wrote: »
    blinding wrote: »
    A way of spreading out the players would help . They are currently playing like children all bunched up .
    The idea of having to kick forward after three hand passes should be trialed in some games .
    It may spread out the players . Lets see . What we have now is a dirge .

    I agree that the over-defensive games are garbage, and would be in favour of doing something to change them.

    I think mandated number of players in each half or something like that, targeted at blanket defences, is a better approach though. If you are without the ball and you know the attack are going to have to kick it whether they are in a good position to do so or not you are just going to hunker down more inside your own D and wait for them to **** it up.
    I admit that keeping attacking players in the attacking half would be a good way to go but how do you police it especially at a run of the mill club game . 
    The ref having to count to three hand passes and then everyone knowing the ball has to be kicked forward would be at least simple . Obviously the ball can be kicked at any time . It would be nice if it was going to be forward mind .

    Perhaps in the future when we have GPS systems for all games a computer could keep track of players , Obviously that is not applicable in this day and age but possibly not as far away as one might think .
    The three hand pass and then kick forward is at least workable .


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 4,138 Mod ✭✭✭✭bruschi


    blinding wrote: »
    I admit that keeping attacking players in the attacking half would be a good way to go but how do you police it especially at a run of the mill club game . 
    The ref having to count to three hand passes and then everyone knowing the ball has to be kicked forward would be at least simple . Obviously the ball can be kicked at any time . It would be nice if it was going to be forward mind .

    Perhaps in the future when we have GPS systems for all games a computer could keep track of players , Obviously that is not applicable in this day and age but possibly not as far away as one might think .
    The three hand pass and then kick forward is at least workable .

    I dont think you are getting Keanes point. If you have to kick it forward after 3 handpasses, then this actually helps defenders and helps a more defensive structure. forcing a team to kick it means the defenders can just sit as far back as they want and wait for it to be kicked. You'll just end up with football ping pong and lads kicking the ball away or like rugby and kick it deep into a corner and try keep them hemmed in.

    As pointed out, the issue is the mass defence, not the ponderous attack. Change the rule on what is the problem as the above will only add to it


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,924 ✭✭✭WesternZulu


    Reducing the game to 13 a-side would help open up the game without any changes to the rules imo.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 7,466 ✭✭✭blinding


    Reducing the game to 13 a-side would help open up the game without any changes to the rules imo.
    Not bad . We could try 14 first and then 13 if thats not enough . Let be honest something has to be done . The conditions were reasonably good in Castlebar yesterday . Both sides have good players any yet we ended up with that . Thanks for all responses / I suppose the 14 or 13 player route would be an interesting experiment . It a pity to see what could be a good game being ruined with the current tactic and whether they like it or not it is not a professional game which is all the more reason to make it watchable and also probably more enjoyable for players i.e. an attacking game please .


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    You could nominate five players before the match that have to stay in the opposition half and give them those electrified dog collars to make sure they don't stray. Would spice up matches anyway.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭mickmackey1


    keane2097 wrote: »
    You could nominate five players before the match that have to stay in the opposition half and give them those electrified dog collars to make sure they don't stray. Would spice up matches anyway.
    That's actually a great idea, bar the dog collars. Forwards and backs must not cross the halfway line, midfielders could roam anywhere. Back to proper, man-on-man football.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    That's actually a great idea, bar the dog collars. Forwards and backs must not cross the halfway line, midfielders could roam anywhere. Back to proper, man-on-man football.

    The dog collars are a key plank of the proposal. I'd be willing to sacrifice the positioning requirement in exchange for random application of shocks to all players.

    Nothing more likely to ruin a well constructed blanket defence than a centre half back writhing due to electrocution at the top of the D.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Honestly though it's a pretty inelegant solution as a hallmark of many if not all great attacking teams is half backs and even corner backs barrelling forward to kick scores.

    It's in the right direction I think but would need a lot of refinement.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,288 ✭✭✭mickmackey1


    keane2097 wrote: »
    The dog collars are a key plank of the proposal. I'd be willing to sacrifice the positioning requirement in exchange for random application of shocks to all players.

    Nothing more likely to ruin a well constructed blanket defence than a centre half back writhing due to electrocution at the top of the D.
    True enough, and extra voltage for the Dubs.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 4,138 Mod ✭✭✭✭bruschi


    keane2097 wrote: »
    The dog collars are a key plank of the proposal. I'd be willing to sacrifice the positioning requirement in exchange for random application of shocks to all players.

    Nothing more likely to ruin a well constructed blanket defence than a centre half back writhing due to electrocution at the top of the D.

    experiment done on it here already!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wilf0X1ejlM



    We could have Joe Brolly and Tomas O Se on the shocking devices! Important to have the ref involved too!


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Glorious.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    True enough, and extra voltage for the Dubs.

    Yes. Because that is EXACTLY what we need. Something to make us run even faster and jump even higher. Great idea. I approve ! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,608 ✭✭✭harpsman


    keane2097 wrote: »
    I agree that the over-defensive games are garbage, and would be in favour of doing something to change them.

    I think mandated number of players in each half or something like that, targeted at blanket defences, is a better approach though. If you are without the ball and you know the attack are going to have to kick it whether they are in a good position to do so or not you are just going to hunker down more inside your own D and wait for them to **** it up.
    Heres my way of solving all your problems- unlimited handpassing inside the 21m line(maybe a couple of meteres more) and only one handpass in the rest of the field. I think teams would be forced to keep players in every zone of the field-otherwise they'd never get out of their own half. Either that or teams would become brilliant at short kick passes-not likely imo


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,277 ✭✭✭danganabu


    I think like all brilliant solutions the best one here is very simple, we leave it at 15 a side, no hand pass rules and no restrictions of field positions, but what we do is we make the ball smaller and give all the players sticks and some sort of head/face protection gear and let them at it. I think it might work :p


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,608 ✭✭✭harpsman


    danganabu wrote: »
    I think like all brilliant solutions the best one here is very simple, we leave it at 15 a side, no hand pass rules and no restrictions of field positions, but what we do is we make the ball smaller and give all the players sticks and some sort of head/face protection gear and let them at it. I think it might work :p
    Would end up looking like hurling-and we all know how boring that is. They cant even get half the counties in Ireland to watch it, let alone anywhere else.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    harpsman wrote: »
    Heres my way of solving all your problems- unlimited handpassing inside the 21m line(maybe a couple of meteres more) and only one handpass in the rest of the field. I think teams would be forced to keep players in every zone of the field-otherwise they'd never get out of their own half. Either that or teams would become brilliant at short kick passes-not likely imo

    It's an interesting idea. I'd be interested to see it trialled.

    My concern would be that I don't think there's much inherently wrong with handpassing, there's been great goals over the years that had plenty of them!



    The problem I'm sure we're all agreed is blanket defences, I worry that any type of restrictions on the team that has the ball will only make the blanket more successful.

    In your scheme would you end up with teams of 800m athletes running up and down taking 10 yard kick passes up to and around the Dubs?


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