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Improvements that are needed in GAA

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,965 ✭✭✭Syferus


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    same as, esp in football. Like the mark in Aussie rules, it would 'force' all players to improve their kicking

    To see a keeper coming up to take 45s isn't a great sign of the ability of the outfield players at the elite level.

    Ban allowing a point from a handpass is another I'd like to see brought in

    Way to punish teams for working the ball into the danger zone. Goal or bust? No friggin' thanks.

    And fouled players having to take frees? Dear lord, do people watch the same sport filled with cynical fouling as I do? That suggestion is so far off-base it's hard to find where to start.

    Every single time a bad free-taker is in a half risky spot he'll be fouled. All you would be doing is empowering dirty play and making the sport more cynical.

    So you want a senior connacht hurling championship with Galway in it? Or are you just referring to underage???

    I have often wondered why a connacht "B" championship without Galway never materialised.

    They restarted the Connacht Intermediate Hurling Championship this year. Don't really know why it's called Intermediate because it's not like there's a senior version and the teams competing in it are the senior teams of the counties involved.

    Only Mayo and Roscommon competed this year with the mighty Ros putting Mayo in their place before some manner of senior football exhibition game between the counties at McHale last month. Didn't stick around for that one.

    Al_Coholic wrote: »
    they had that years ago when when free kicks taken from the hand was introduced...also had a rule at a free kick if you bounced a solo-ed the ball before the free kick was taken the ref threw the ball up...obviously that didnt work.

    i said it yesterday in a different thread that added on time is a sham in games...always 2 minutes added on at the end of a game even though there are so many stoppages in the 2nd half..especially with subs coming on.

    I was at a county championship game last year where a grand total of 15 minutes was added to the game even though there were few stoppages. The referee seemed to believe club football games were 70 minute matches. Be careful what you wish for.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,631 ✭✭✭Dirty Dingus McGee


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    same as, esp in football. Like the mark in Aussie rules, it would 'force' all players to improve their kicking

    To see a keeper coming up to take 45s isn't a great sign of the ability of the outfield players at the elite level.

    Ban allowing a point from a handpass is another I'd like to see brought in


    Or maybe it is indication of how good the goalkeeper is.

    Kicking the ball from the ground is no longer a required skill for an outfield player so there isnt a huge amount of point in them spending hours of practicing something they are required to do maybe 3 or 4 times during a game.Goalies practice kicking from the ground constantly so not as much extra effort would be expended by them kicking 45s.

    Then handpassed point is needed if a player is bottled up and has noother way of getting a score.Its frustrating whgen players do it when they are clean through on goals though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,095 ✭✭✭keeponhurling


    There are a few I'd like to see. Propper action in the first moments of a game. For example the hit on Iarla Tannian in the replay last year was a disgrace and should of been a straight red. Even if the referee had seen it then it probably wouldn't of been a yellow. It's very rare I've seen decisive action early on.
    .

    Absolutely right, a red card is a red card. The Tadgh Kennelly incident is one obvious example.

    A couple of years ago in an All-Ireland club semi-final, a Portlaiise lad was sent off in the first minute for what was essentially an assault. Of course all we heard was that the ref ruined the game, not that the player ruined his side's hopes.

    Similarly towards the end of the match, when the result is already decided, refs can decide not to send players off as "there's no advantage to the opposition".
    Ref later admitted as much after the Clare-Offaly saga in 1998, but refs often do it.

    A strong line needs to be taken against violence.


  • Registered Users Posts: 67 ✭✭eire 2012


    There are a few I'd like to see. Propper action in the first moments of a game. For example the hit on Iarla Tannian in the replay last year was a disgrace and should of been a straight red. Even if the referee had seen it then it probably wouldn't of been a yellow. It's very rare I've seen decisive action .

    The ball was there I'm afraid it's just unlucky he got a belt on the ankle.Im fairly sure there was no ball on the back of Richie powers head or on tj reids kneecap either for that matter so have a look closer to home for the red card incidents.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭Flukey


    Having the fouled player take the free might be a bit difficult if he's been stretchered off. Aside from that, there is no logic in having the fouled player take the free anyway. As mentioned, it was done originally when the free from the hand was first introduced. Common sense soon prevailed though. The line ball from the hand should be better policed, in terms of it being take from the correct spot and having the ball have to be kicked as the player reaches the line, not several yards after he's crossed it onto the pitch.

    Players taking a quick free and deliberately kicking it at an opponent and then claiming the extra 10 yards because the opponent was too close when the free was taken should also be clamped down upon. It is another cynical act.

    I'd like to see a rule for GAA sports, and indeed soccer and rugby, whereby no substitutes would be allowed after 5 minutes before the end of normal time, with the obvious exception of genuine injuries. So once you hit 65 minutes, that is it: no more subs. This mallarkey of bringing on subs several minutes into injury time is stupid, and purely a cynical waste of time. For many the first bit of physical action they have is when their ear starts working as it detects the final whistle.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,139 ✭✭✭Red Crow


    eire 2012 wrote: »
    The ball was there I'm afraid it's just unlucky he got a belt on the ankle.Im fairly sure there was no ball on the back of Richie powers head or on tj reids kneecap either for that matter so have a look closer to home for the red card incidents.

    Actually if you look at it he went straight for his ankles but to you it was just a coincidence that the guy that got taken out was man of the match in the first game and was cleaning out the KK midfield.

    I'm not talking about red card incidents per say, I'm talking about taking action early on for serious foul play. It's a common thing in the GAA to allow the early hit and it shouldn't be allowed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Flukey, your excellent posts on pretty much every other issue makes your disingenuous posts on Croke Park seem all the more inane. You are probably the only person I know of who still tries to avoid the issue by pretending Croke Park isn't Dublin's home venue from Dublin or from elsewhere. There are better arguments you could be making, that one makes you look biased to the point of not being worth listening to on the issue.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,606 ✭✭✭harpsman


    Syferus wrote: »
    Way to punish teams for working the ball into the danger zone. Goal or bust? No friggin' thanks.




    Bit of a silly point,no pun intended; sure why not let them hand pass it into net or throw it in for that matter.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭Hidalgo


    Syferus wrote: »
    Way to punish teams for working the ball into the danger zone. Goal or bust? No friggin' thanks.

    And fouled players having to take frees? Dear lord, do people watch the same sport filled with cynical fouling as I do? That suggestion is so far off-base it's hard to find where to start.

    Every single time a bad free-taker is in a half risky spot he'll be fouled. All you would be doing is empowering dirty play and making the sport more cynical.




    They restarted the Connacht Intermediate Hurling Championship this year. Don't really know why it's called Intermediate because it's not like there's a senior version and the teams competing in it are the senior teams of the counties involved.

    Only Mayo and Roscommon competed this year with the mighty Ros putting Mayo in their place before some manner of senior football exhibition game between the counties at McHale last month. Didn't stick around for that one.




    I was at a county championship game last year where a grand total of 15 minutes was added to the game even though there were few stoppages. The referee seemed to believe club football games were 70 minute matches. Be careful what you wish for.

    Encourage kicking, it is football after all, not handball. Very little skill involved in fisting a ball over the bar.

    The banned handpassing a goal in hurling, why not ban a handpassed point in football

    Whatever about club level, at intercounty surely every player should be capable of kicking the ball relatively accurately, this is the elite level after all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,569 ✭✭✭✭ProudDUB


    Flukey wrote: »

    I'd like to see a rule for GAA sports, and indeed soccer and rugby, whereby no substitutes would be allowed after 5 minutes before the end of normal time, with the obvious exception of genuine injuries. So once you hit 65 minutes, that is it: no more subs. This mallarkey of bringing on subs several minutes into injury time is stupid, and purely a cynical waste of time. For many the first bit of physical action they have is when their ear starts working as it detects the final whistle.

    I'd agree with all of that. However, with the degree of cuteness and cynicism going on these days, what's to stop a player from going down screaming hysterically about something serious like his neck or back, to make it look like he is seriously injured, when he is in fact perfectly fine. Then the manager gets to make a change, or slow the game down, or eat up precious minutes or whatever, but the ref is none the wiser. I'd be perfectly happy with a no subs at all in the last 5 minutes rule.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,845 ✭✭✭Hidalgo


    The advantage rule is oddly used by refs at times.
    Time and time again, the ref waves an outstretched hand allowing advantage to a player being fouled when it would be a better advantage to win the free.
    In the hurling Sat evening, a Waterford player received advantage even though he was on his knees and surrounded by 3 KK players, what advantage is there in that?
    Happens in every game in both codes.

    A new rule being put in place in Ladies football is ref cam, ref wears a small camera on his her/her head. One advantage of this is viewers will get to see on TV exactly what the ref sees. We get multiple views on TV replays but often a ref is trying to spot something through a crowd of players. It'll be interesting to see it through the refs 'eyes'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    The advantage rule is oddly used by refs at times.
    Time and time again, the ref waves an outstretched hand allowing advantage to a player being fouled when it would be a better advantage to win the free.
    In the hurling Sat evening, a Waterford player received advantage even though he was on his knees and surrounded by 3 KK players, what advantage is there in that?
    Happens in every game in both codes.

    A new rule being put in place in Ladies football is ref cam, ref wears a small camera on his her/her head. One advantage of this is viewers will get to see on TV exactly what the ref sees. We get multiple views on TV replays but often a ref is trying to spot something through a crowd of players. It'll be interesting to see it through the refs 'eyes'.

    Advantage is confused for "can keep going" by refs. They badly need to be trained on that front.


  • Registered Users Posts: 610 ✭✭✭GBXI


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    The advantage rule is oddly used by refs at times.
    Time and time again, the ref waves an outstretched hand allowing advantage to a player being fouled when it would be a better advantage to win the free.
    In the hurling Sat evening, a Waterford player received advantage even though he was on his knees and surrounded by 3 KK players, what advantage is there in that?
    Happens in every game in both codes.

    A new rule being put in place in Ladies football is ref cam, ref wears a small camera on his her/her head. One advantage of this is viewers will get to see on TV exactly what the ref sees. We get multiple views on TV replays but often a ref is trying to spot something through a crowd of players. It'll be interesting to see it through the refs 'eyes'.

    The answer to your advantage issue is not a change of rules but the standard of refs the GAA produce. It's about having a ref who knows how the game should be played and he can then know when to either let play continue or to call the free.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,631 ✭✭✭Dirty Dingus McGee


    Hidalgo wrote: »
    Encourage kicking, it is football after all, not handball. Very little skill involved in fisting a ball over the bar.

    The banned handpassing a goal in hurling, why not ban a handpassed point in football

    Whatever about club level, at intercounty surely every player should be capable of kicking the ball relatively accurately, this is the elite level after all.


    Its got absolutely nothing to do with a a lack of skill. I dont like players opting for a fisted point if a goal is on however in some cicumstances a player can be bottled up and has no other option but fist the ball over the bar.Not allowing fisted points would punish attacking teams.

    Ciaran Kilkenny scored a fisted point against Kildare a few weks ago from about 20 yards because it was the best option available to get a score, he didnt decide to fist the ball over the bar bcasue he lacked skill which he certainly doesnt.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,664 ✭✭✭sid waddell


    Flukey wrote: »
    Croke Park is in Dublin, but it is not Dublin's home ground. All counties have many venues in their counties, but only one is the county ground. In Dublin's case that is Parnell Park. Croke Park is no more Dublin's home ground than Cappawhite's ground is Tipperary's home ground or Confey is Kildare's home grounds. In fact Croke Park is no more Dublin's home ground than Thurles is Dublin's home ground or Casement Park is Dublin's home ground. There are about 2500 clubs in Ireland and that many and more pitches, but of them all, Parnell Park is the only one that is Dublin's home ground. Fact, not fantasy.
    What's Cork's home ground?


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭Flukey


    keane2097 wrote: »
    Flukey, your excellent posts on pretty much every other issue makes your disingenuous posts on Croke Park seem all the more inane. You are probably the only person I know of who still tries to avoid the issue by pretending Croke Park isn't Dublin's home venue from Dublin or from elsewhere. There are better arguments you could be making, that one makes you look biased to the point of not being worth listening to on the issue.

    Sorry, but whether people believe it or not, the fact remains that Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground and anyone that says it is, is wrong. That is all I ever say on that specific point. I am not pretending anything. We can argue about the advantages of Dublin playing there, though evidence indicates there is little or none, but when someone starts that debate by saying that Dublin's home ground is Croke Park, they are wrong and should be corrected. It is no more Dublin's home ground than the Melbourne Cricket Ground or the San Siro or Aintree or any sports venue you care to mention in the world, bar Parnell Park in Donnycarney.

    Year in, year out the "Dublin have an advantage playing at Croke Park" debate comes up and I've often addressed its various components. It is a fair enough debate to have. Often people say it, and then give nothing to back it up. Myself and others go through the points they've made over and over, which clearly points to it being little or no advantage, and usually no one is able to back up their argument or take it any further when given the statistics. Whenever the debate comes up I'll address those arguments and if during the debate anyone says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground, I will correct them. If my crime is giving people correct information and clearing up a common misconception, then anyone giving any correct information in this forum or anywhere else on Boards.ie is as guilty as I am. If 99.99% of people believe something to be true, that does not make it true. As part of the 0.01% that know the truth, I will let the 99.99% know and will make no apologies for doing so. You may say I am disingenuous, but there is nothing disingenuous in stating the truth.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,664 ✭✭✭sid waddell


    What's Cork's home ground, seeing as they split their home matches between Pairc Ui Chaoimh and Pairc Ui Rinn?

    Remember, you said that every team only has one home ground.

    So, if, for the sake of argument, Pairc Ui Chaoimh is Cork's home ground, you're trying to tell us Pairc Ui Rinn is as much their home ground as Aintree?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Flukey wrote: »
    Sorry, but whether people believe it or not, the fact remains that Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground and anyone that says it is, is wrong. That is all I ever say on that specific point. I am not pretending anything. We can argue about the advantages of Dublin playing there, though evidence indicates there is little or none, but when someone starts that debate by saying that Dublin's home ground is Croke Park, they are wrong and should be corrected. It is no more Dublin's home ground than the Melbourne Cricket Ground or the San Siro or Aintree or any sports venue you care to mention in the world, bar Parnell Park in Donnycarney.

    Year in, year out the "Dublin have an advantage playing at Croke Park" debate comes up and I've often addressed its various components. It is a fair enough debate to have. Often people say it, and then give nothing to back it up. Myself and others go through the points they've made over and over, which clearly points to it being little or no advantage, and usually no one is able to back up their argument or take it any further when given the statistics. Whenever the debate comes up I'll address those arguments and if during the debate anyone says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground, I will correct them. If my crime is giving people correct information and clearing up a common misconception, then anyone giving any correct information in this forum or anywhere else on Boards.ie is as guilty as I am. If 99.99% of people believe something to be true, that does not make it true. As part of the 0.01% that know the truth, I will let the 99.99% know and will make no apologies for doing so. You may say I am disingenuous, but there is nothing disingenuous in stating the truth.

    It is completely and utterly disingenuous to maintain that Parnell Park is the Dublin footballer's home pitch, simply because it's written down in some obsolete ledger somewhere.

    I'm sure you're already aware of the distinction between de jure and de facto, so I won't explain it to you. Maintaining that Parnell Park is the home ground when they have not played a match there in years simply because of an exercise in optics by the Leinster Council or whoever is responsible for making these things official is plain and simple intellectual dishonesty.
    What's Cork's home ground, seeing as they split their home matches between Pairc Ui Chaoimh and Pairc Ui Rinn?

    Remember, you said that every team only has one home ground.

    So, if, for the sake of argument, Pairc Ui Chaoimh is Cork's home ground, you're trying to tell us Pairc Ui Rinn is as much their home ground as Aintree?

    It's also fairly exposed by this obvious point as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,965 ✭✭✭Syferus


    Semantics are something that should be exclusively saved for politicians and CEOs.

    Dublin get to play home games almost exclusively, simple. The degree to which it helps or hinders the Dubs is up for debate and, yes, Dublin's huge crowds helps bankroll the GAA in less populous areas of the country. Is it unfair in the sense other counties don't get the same comforts? Hell yes.

    To call it a nessecary evil is too much but to call it nessecary is not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭Flukey


    What I am telling you Sid is that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park. Now, we have that point cleared up, so can we move on and get the thread back on track? Freddiek brought if off track and others have continued with it, but Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground. It can't be made any clearer than that. Hopefully no one else will mention the issue in the thread again. I won't bring it up, though I will reserve the right to correct anyone that says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground subsequent to this. It will be that person that will be prolonging the issue, not me. So now that everyone knows the fact that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park, there is absolutely nothing more to be said about it, so can we please move on? So, getting back to where we were before Freddiek rudely interrupted, what improvements are needed in the GAA?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    Flukey wrote: »
    What I am telling you Sid is that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park. Now, we have that point cleared up, so can we move on and get the thread back on track? Freddiek brought if off track and others have continued with it, but Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground. It can't be made any clearer than that. Hopefully no one else will mention the issue in the thread again. I won't bring it up, though I will reserve the right to correct anyone that says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground subsequent to this. It will be that person that will be prolonging the issue, not me. So now that everyone knows the fact that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park, there is absolutely nothing more to be said about it, so can we please move on? So, getting back to where we were before Freddiek rudely interrupted, what improvements are needed in the GAA?

    One improvement would be acknowledging the fact that Croke Park is Dublin's home ground and has been for years so we no longer have to listen to this asinine garbage.


  • Registered Users Posts: 347 ✭✭Concannon7


    A proper advantage rule in hurling.

    Injury time added accordingly. Sometimes it seems like they pick a random number from there head when it comes to injury time.

    Galway hurling teams of all ages including clubs to be included in Leinster competitions. Galway hurlers not playing any games at under age level until the s/f stage makes no sense.

    Forgetting geographical boundaries and dividing what are currently known as provencial championships into four separate championships of eight teams.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,770 ✭✭✭✭keane2097


    A proper advantage rule in hurling.

    Injury time added accordingly. Sometimes it seems like they pick a random number from there head when it comes to injury time.

    Galway hurling teams of all ages including clubs to be included in Leinster competitions. Galway hurlers not playing any games at under age level until the s/f stag
    Motion 24 provides for a public time clock to be introduced in Croke Park and in all Grounds used for Provincial and All-Ireland Series Senior Football Championship games. The clock will be stopped during the game during certain stoppages of play, and the end of the game shall be signalled by a hooter.

    From 1st of January I believe.


  • Registered Users Posts: 80 ✭✭emmetfahy


    It was never intended that you could score from your own half as now. Make the sliotar heavier.

    (incidently the same could go for most other sports)


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,277 ✭✭✭gucci


    Kicking the ball from the ground is no longer a required skill for an outfield player so there isnt a huge amount of point in them spending hours of practicing something they are required to do maybe 3 or 4 times during a game.Goalies practice kicking from the ground constantly so not as much extra effort would be expended by them kicking 45s.
    Surely if you were good enough at it (whether goal keeper or wherever) you would get more than 3 or 4 scoring opportunities a game to do it!! Would probably be worth practicing!!

    Flukey wrote: »
    Having the fouled player take the free might be a bit difficult if he's been stretchered off. Aside from that, there is no logic in having the fouled player take the free anyway. As mentioned, it was done originally when the free from the hand was first introduced. Common sense soon prevailed though.

    In Aus Rules, if a player is not fit to take the mark, its the next closest player to the incident (in the view of the umpire...therefore open to debate!!)
    I wouldnt be in support of the fouled player to take the free enforcement.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,443 ✭✭✭InchicoreDude


    They restarted the Connacht Intermediate Hurling Championship this year. Don't really know why it's called Intermediate because it's not like there's a senior version and the teams competing in it are the senior teams of the counties involved.

    Only Mayo and Roscommon competed this year with the mighty Ros putting Mayo in their place before some manner of senior football exhibition game between the counties at McHale last month. Didn't stick around for that one.

    Aah ok cool, missed that competition. Definitely worth doing. Be nice to have it as a curtain raiser to a football match in Connacht though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,893 ✭✭✭Poor_old_gill


    Flukey wrote: »
    What I am telling you Sid is that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park. Now, we have that point cleared up, so can we move on and get the thread back on track? Freddiek brought if off track and others have continued with it, but Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground. It can't be made any clearer than that. Hopefully no one else will mention the issue in the thread again. I won't bring it up, though I will reserve the right to correct anyone that says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground subsequent to this. It will be that person that will be prolonging the issue, not me. So now that everyone knows the fact that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park, there is absolutely nothing more to be said about it, so can we please move on? So, getting back to where we were before Freddiek rudely interrupted, what improvements are needed in the GAA?

    I don't know why you are maintaining such a childish approach to the debate.
    You're either on the wind-up or there is something very wrong with you.
    I think the former but I'm not 100% sure


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭Flukey


    It should be left open as to who takes a free. No rule on the fouled player or the next closest or anything like that. You've different types of frees, like ones within scoring range to frees clearing out of defence. Certain players may be better equipped to take a free of different kinds. The fouled player may be better positioned ahead of the ball or behind than being the one taking it.

    I would not favour the scrapping of the provincial championships, despite the imbalances. Days like the provincial Hurling finals over the last two Sundays are perfect examples as to why to keep them. The Kerrys, Dublins, Kilkennys etc. of this world may not take as much value out of some provincial titles over counties that win them occasionally, but they are still important. Even for counties that do win them regularly you have to remember that there are lads winning their first provincial title on those teams on any given day. Kerry may have over 70 Munster titles, but they still have players picking up their first ones and it means a lot to those individuals. Even redrawing the boundaries a little, would take something away. Leave them as they are, and give counties something to aspire to in the traditional way.

    No matter what way you redraw boundaries or organise the championship, come September only one county can take Sam away and only one county can take Liam away, and it will be one of the strong counties. No weaker county will ever win the championship no matter what way it is organised, but a weaker county of today could be a stronger county in a few years and win an All-Ireland then. That has happened. So it is down to the counties themselves to improve their standards and win things that way, not a new version of our competitions.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,664 ✭✭✭sid waddell


    Flukey wrote: »
    What I am telling you Sid is that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park. Now, we have that point cleared up, so can we move on and get the thread back on track? Freddiek brought if off track and others have continued with it, but Croke Park is not Dublin's home ground. It can't be made any clearer than that. Hopefully no one else will mention the issue in the thread again. I won't bring it up, though I will reserve the right to correct anyone that says Croke Park is Dublin's home ground subsequent to this. It will be that person that will be prolonging the issue, not me. So now that everyone knows the fact that Parnell Park is Dublin's home ground, not Croke Park, there is absolutely nothing more to be said about it, so can we please move on? So, getting back to where we were before Freddiek rudely interrupted, what improvements are needed in the GAA?
    It doesn't matter what the Dublin County Board say. You can fairly argue that Parnell Park is the main county ground, in that it hosts the latter stages of the club championships, but it is clearly not the main home venue of the county teams these days. A team's main home ground is where it plays its home matches, as long as it is in the county. Dublin footballers and hurlers have played all their home games for the last three years (bar a couple of league matches the hurlers played in Parnell) in Croke Park.

    The notion that there is only one home ground for each county team is plainly a nonsense. Of course Parnell Park is a home ground for Dublin, but these days it effectively fulfils the role that Dungannon plays for Tyrone, Fraher Field for Waterford, Ballina for Mayo, that of a secondary home venue.

    Croke Park is the main home ground for inter-county action for Dublin, simply because that's where they play the vast majority of games these days, and of course it always fulfilled that role until 1995 anyway, before league matches moved to Parnell Park. Dublin footballers have also never had a home championship match at Parnell Park (well, OK, London in 2004, so one).


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,965 ✭✭✭Syferus


    Aah ok cool, missed that competition. Definitely worth doing. Be nice to have it as a curtain raiser to a football match in Connacht though.

    It was! Think about what 'exhibition' game was on in McHale between Roscommon and Mayo in June :(


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