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Remote working - the future?

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  • all this is so spurious. relationships with work colleagues can be built perfectly fine online these days.

    i'm far more concerned with building a relationship with my 1 year old daughter who i get to see every day now.

    Work is work. and i'll work hard but i'm not gonna sit on a Dart for 2.5 hours a day for no reason.

    Completely - you are more concerned with building a relationship with your daughter - of course, that makes 100% sense, but why should your employer care about that at the expense of their objectives e..g building strong, meaningful, personal relationships with customers?

    Flexibility works both ways, give and take.




  • Completely - you are more concerned with building a relationship with your daughter - of course, that makes 100% sense, but why should your employer care about that at the expense of their objectives e..g building strong, meaningful, personal relationships with customers?

    Flexibility works both ways, give and take.

    But none of that is part of my job and, even if it was, that can and is done online.




  • C3PO wrote: »
    We are having a similar reaction from many of our staff, particularly the younger ones who tend to live in house shares and apartments.

    That's who office's suit :

    - young employees with no experience of office politics and bullshyte
    - those with no decent home office/suitable home situation
    - middle 'managers' who's ego's need the attention and to justify their existence/salary.
    - and those who feed off the manipulation and political bullshyte that goes on in "offices".
    - the lonely




  • One individual's productivity can't be looked at in isolation - somebody WFH full time may result in less knowledge transfer and reduce productivity of other colleagues for example. It could have knock on effects in terms of culture and values and team spirit which may affect some colleagues more than others.

    Also, how do you measure productivity when there is a significant relationship building component - meeting a client every month virtually may not build the same trust as face to face though in terms of contact time they may be recorded as the same, and productivity therefore measured as the same, but the impact may not be.

    I really think 1-2 days on-site working brings benefits that some may not want to admit.

    Looks like you haven't woken up the fact that the day of that droning corporate rhetoric and bullshyte above is over. Now people in a teams calls can just simply turn you down low, and let you drone away in the background while they get their real work for the day done. Yet, you need them back in the office so you can corral them in a stuffy smelly meeting room to listen to your dung and justify your overpaid existence and time wasting, while they pretend to look interested, and so as to try not to dribble/fall asleep on their notepads, play buzzword bingo, by amusingly predicting and ticking off every silly cliché and meaningless corporate buzzard you use, wasting hours, while they patiently wait to get back to doing some real work.

    The day of the office droning pointless wanna be middle manager dinosaur is over, catch up.




  • Swindled wrote: »
    - and those who feed off the manipulation and political bullshyte that goes on in "offices".

    Surely you mean those play a vital role in coordinating efforts across teams :confused:
    One of the things that made me laugh is that, as soon as the WFH became obvious the cohort of office polticians in our place went into overtime treating internal comms tools like they were on ****ing Linkedin to keep promoting themselves to all and sundry :D


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  • Bambi wrote: »
    Surely you mean those play a vital role in coordinating efforts across teams :confused:
    One of the things that made me laugh is that, as soon as the WFH became obvious the cohort of office polticians in our place went into overtime treating internal comms tools like they were on ****ing Linkedin to keep promoting themselves to all and sundry :D

    WFH terrifies them, because they have no where to hide now, and have to start showing some actual work of their own.

    Meanwhile actual business owners love WFH, massive cost savings, and getting to WFH more often as well.




  • Looking the big picture rather than surveys taken at one moment in time then working from home his going to replace office work largely. The savings are just massive for companies, so their interests coincide with their employees very nicely. People might like an outing once or twice a month and companies might like workers to meet each other too, so they may go with small hubs, in easily accessible areas, but the vast majority of work will be remote.
    I already got out of the Dublin property market, other people could probably safely hang on for a year or two, but it’s a mugs game to get into it now unless you’re looking for a v quick return. Don’t buy for your pension.
    Across the world the implications are massive and it comes at a time when cities in many countries had become unaffordable, so its a good time for this change.
    But there will be problems, urban blight will be back, like we had in the 80s. Cities will eventually become centres for heavy industries again but that could take a generation or more.




  • What are peoples feelings on the remote hubs that are popping up everywhere? Three fairly good sized ones planned within a 20km radius of me, I’d be a bit sceptical that they’ll fill them tbh. Government pushing them like mad with grants so they obviously see them having a big role going forward. I can’t see myself using one but my office is relatively close by, if I had a long commute it may be a different story. Anybody here planning on working from one?




  • What are peoples feelings on the remote hubs that are popping up everywhere? Three fairly good sized ones planned within a 20km radius of me, I’d be a bit sceptical that they’ll fill them tbh. Government pushing them like mad with grants so they obviously see them having a big role going forward. I can’t see myself using one but my office is relatively close by, if I had a long commute it may be a different story. Anybody here planning on working from one?

    I'd see them as being great options for those who for whatever reason can't work from home, and/or have a long commute, and can't stand the now obsolete office nonsense that goes on. Great for businesses too, who now no longer have to provide and maintain offices for one or two meetings or in person get togethers a week.




  • While it might be good news for some people in rural areas there will be problems too.
    https://clarechampion.ie/locals-getting-squeezed-out-in-north-clare-property-boom/
    Here property is getting too dear for locals, at a time when there is a huge level of unemployment. What’ll it be like if there is a post pandemic boom in the wider economy?
    This is the beginning of the biggest change in population spread in living memory.


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  • My work had a heavily subsidised nice canteen and free coffee, so I recon I'm actually down money. My commute was only 10 minutes so I'm hardly saving any time or petrol. I worked on a sound team and I miss the chats over lunch and meeting new people. I don't particularly benfit from less interruptions because when I needed to focus I used to put on my earphones and people would know not to bother me.

    Work from home has been pretty boring for me.




  • What are peoples feelings on the remote hubs that are popping up everywhere? Three fairly good sized ones planned within a 20km radius of me, I’d be a bit sceptical that they’ll fill them tbh. Government pushing them like mad with grants so they obviously see them having a big role going forward. I can’t see myself using one but my office is relatively close by, if I had a long commute it may be a different story. Anybody here planning on working from one?

    I used one in 2016 when I lived in a different house. It was nice to get out of the house 2-3 days a week and have people to talk to at coffee breaks. I have a better home office setup now and live in a less remote location so not sure if need it now. For people without a dedicated home office they’re great.




  • I think it’s great but I do miss going in to the office for a bit of social interaction. I’d be quite happy to go 2 days a week and 3 at home, I think that’s the best balance.
    As far as it being the future, I think so yes. I’ve just taken a new job and it’s fully remote with travel to office locations once a month or so.
    The other 4 I interviewed for this last 6-8 weeks for all offered a hybrid model, mostly 2/3 days a month in office.




  • I am loving WFH, cutting out the commute has honestly been a complete life changer for me for so many reasons. I don't miss the office 'banter' or the politics, I can just do my job in peace. I'm more productive and I'm happier in my job with 100% WFH.

    All that said I have zero hope for the long term with regard to WFH. There are already some companies who said that they'd be supporting WFH post pandemic backtracking now. Lots of places starting to drag people in for 2-3 days but it'll start creeping up. Oh we just need you 1 extra day per week, just until the project is finished. But when the project is over the expectation will be that you're there that extra day all the time. A competitor company might win a contract because they have people on the ground, or they're more flexible with sending people to client site - so the management will say we need to get everyone back. It might take a few months but I feel that many will eventually end up back 5 days per week in the office.

    I also think there'll be a big political push to get people back to the cities. The wheels of the economy have to turn and you need people spending for that. Fuel, public transport, the morning coffee, lunch out, after work dinner/drinks, bit of clothes shopping the odd time. I've saved a fortune on all this in the last year.

    Maybe I have an overly pessimistic view of it all, but I have a feeling that there are too many vested interests against WFH and the happiness/wellness of the employee is the very bottom of the list when it comes to these decisions.




  • I am loving WFH, cutting out the commute has honestly been a complete life changer for me for so many reasons. I don't miss the office 'banter' or the politics, I can just do my job in peace. I'm more productive and I'm happier in my job with 100% WFH.

    All that said I have zero hope for the long term with regard to WFH. There are already some companies who said that they'd be supporting WFH post pandemic backtracking now. Lots of places starting to drag people in for 2-3 days but it'll start creeping up. Oh we just need you 1 extra day per week, just until the project is finished. But when the project is over the expectation will be that you're there that extra day all the time. A competitor company might win a contract because they have people on the ground, or they're more flexible with sending people to client site - so the management will say we need to get everyone back. It might take a few months but I feel that many will eventually end up back 5 days per week in the office.

    I also think there'll be a big political push to get people back to the cities. The wheels of the economy have to turn and you need people spending for that. Fuel, public transport, the morning coffee, lunch out, after work dinner/drinks, bit of clothes shopping the odd time. I've saved a fortune on all this in the last year.

    Maybe I have an overly pessimistic view of it all, but I have a feeling that there are too many vested interests against WFH and the happiness/wellness of the employee is the very bottom of the list when it comes to these decisions.

    I really hope you are being overly pessimistic there and I do think there’s no putting the wfh genie back in the bottle. It’s up to us all to really ensure this opportunity isn’t lost




  • I think it’s great but I do miss going in to the office for a bit of social interaction. I’d be quite happy to go 2 days a week and 3 at home, I think that’s the best balance.
    As far as it being the future, I think so yes. I’ve just taken a new job and it’s fully remote with travel to office locations once a month or so.
    The other 4 I interviewed for this last 6-8 weeks for all offered a hybrid model, mostly 2/3 days a month in office.

    The need for social interaction is going to bring more changes. Having the internet in the home has made people more reclusive, for example see the rise of following streamed TV series and the decline of pubs. But that could change now as office based social life evaporates. Sporting clubs, drama organisations, etc should become much more popular. Whisper it, but the busy midweek pub could make a return.




  • If I am asked to go into office more than 2-3 days a week I’ll simply have to quit my job. No two ways about it.




  • Hello everybody

    Just wondering what everyone's employer is doing now in relation to future working arrangements (assuming you can wfh).

    the Whitaker poll from NUI Galway showed almost one third of all time want to work remotely 100% of the time.

    Personally, having wfh'd since March 2020, I have seen the huge benefits of no stressful commutes - more productive, more time with family, just happier!
    That said, I am a home owner with a small office space (but does the trick) and have reliable broadband.

    I am not sure I can ever see myself commuting again.

    What are people's general thoughts on this? I believe many offices may have pressure from Senior Execs to get people back in the office.

    I want a balance. Few days in the office would suit me.




  • While it might be good news for some people in rural areas there will be problems too.
    https://clarechampion.ie/locals-getting-squeezed-out-in-north-clare-property-boom/
    Here property is getting too dear for locals, at a time when there is a huge level of unemployment. What’ll it be like if there is a post pandemic boom in the wider economy?
    This is the beginning of the biggest change in population spread in living memory.

    These towns and counties are dying, young people are moving out and going to cities. Remote working will regenerate a lot of villages and towns around the country.

    How anyone would think this is bad I have no idea.




  • Jim2007 wrote: »
    Why, how will you justify the costs of bring people into the office for no good reason?


    It will be gone in one of the first cost cutting exercises.

    There's tax implications for companies if their staff are remotely working in different countries. So they'll make staff come in a few days to make sure that they are resident in the country where they are employed.


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  • ineedeuro wrote: »
    These towns and counties are dying, young people are moving out and going to cities. Remote working will regenerate a lot of villages and towns around the country.

    How anyone would think this is bad I have no idea.

    It is overall a good thing, but there are issues. These are the challenges of the coming years and very different to what has come before.




  • ineedeuro wrote: »
    These towns and counties are dying, young people are moving out and going to cities. Remote working will regenerate a lot of villages and towns around the country.

    How anyone would think this is bad I have no idea.

    This is definitely a chance to breath life back into rural communities - I know of one cafe in Longford that’s never been busier, the whole town is buzzing with life




  • Lads, have people the inability to socially interact outside of the work environment or what's the crack ? Big bad world out there outside of the watercooler chats lads....




  • This is definitely a chance to breath life back into rural communities - I know of one cafe in Longford that’s never been busier, the whole town is buzzing with life

    Was just saying this yesterday on our huddle, local young lad opened a small coffee shop in neighboring village here. I pop over a few lunch times a week now and he's flying it! Normally my money would have been to a coffee shop in the city. while i still support the city cafe's on the weekends its great to be able to support a local business as well.




  • It is overall a good thing, but there are issues. These are the challenges of the coming years and very different to what has come before.

    Sorry but I don't understand, it seems to be a case of finding a problem when their isn't one.

    People moving outside cities means towns/villages get regenerated. Suddenly local football teams have more & more kids playing in them. People can set up local business to provide for the new people. Vacant houses are taken up. The pressure on homelessness in major cities is taken off.
    Loads and loads more positives

    You will be hard to find negatives but I am sure some people will




  • ineedeuro wrote: »
    Sorry but I don't understand, it seems to be a case of finding a problem when their isn't one.

    People moving outside cities means towns/villages get regenerated. Suddenly local football teams have more & more kids playing in them. People can set up local business to provide for the new people. Vacant houses are taken up. The pressure on homelessness in major cities is taken off.
    Loads and loads more positives

    You will be hard to find negatives but I am sure some people will

    Well, it's in the article.
    People in the Lahinch area have had to leave because there is a shortage of property, their landlords are taking the opportunity to cash in, and there's nothing else in the area for them. Buying is also far more difficult for locals, who aren't as well paid as people working remotely for Dublin based companies.
    It's not that WFH isn't overall a good thing for rural areas, it definitely is, but it isn't without challenges, and it should be planned for. Surely that's not hard to understand. In fact it'd be amazing if a huge change in population patterns didn't come with challenges.




  • Well, it's in the article.
    People in the Lahinch area have had to leave because there is a shortage of property, their landlords are taking the opportunity to cash in, and there's nothing else in the area for them. Buying is also far more difficult for locals, who aren't as well paid as people working remotely for Dublin based companies.
    It's not that WFH isn't overall a good thing for rural areas, it definitely is, but it isn't without challenges, and it should be planned for. Surely that's not hard to understand. In fact it'd be amazing if a huge change in population patterns didn't come with challenges.

    Nowhere is safe from the WFH gentrification




  • timmyntc wrote: »
    Nowhere is safe from the WFH gentrification

    As I said, remote working will definitely be good for rural areas overall.

    But there are already challenges. Lahinch would probably be one of the more desirable rural areas to live in, you might snigger but it's bound to see rapidly increasing prices, it already has. Other coastal areas will too. Of course that's fine if it doesn't affect you, but it's a problem for some people.




  • fits wrote: »
    If I am asked to go into office more than 2-3 days a week I’ll simply have to quit my job. No two ways about it.

    Plenty of choice now too, the days of holding people hostage are over


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  • fits wrote: »
    Remote working doesn’t work for younger people in house shares who need to learn from more senior people

    That said I would be happy to work remotely three to four days a week. It suits me and my family well.

    How does that make sense? Are people not in house shares in the first place because they need to be situated close to work? If they were remote working they could live wherever they wanted.

    And this idea of needing to be in person to learn from seniority is absolute nonsense. I am a young worker myself and I have found no difference. If anything it has become easier with everyone being immediately contactable and having their status (available, busy, etc.) constantly on display. Compare that to the office when someone you could be looking for can just randomly go missing for the whole day.


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