Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Intel

12346

Comments



  • Obviously not. Nobody said they have a legal obligation.

    But I think we should draw a distinction between, say, modern poetry and computer engineering.

    Where something is so obviously an industrial skill, theres an argument that it should be funded by employers. After all, it is they who will profit from it, it isn't something that people tend to study for personal fulfilment.

    I had to sit postgraduate exams when I started out in my career. The employer paid for these, and the idea that I'd have to pay out of my own pocket (for their benefit!) would have been obviously absurd.

    You seem to offer the notion that the benefit is one sided.
    Actually, it would be more beneficial to manufacturing companies to employ folks out of college. They get grants, and don't have to pay for the education of the new employees.




  • YellowLead wrote: »
    Their benefit only? Really? I assume most people take up those courses because they want a better position with better pay. You feel they do it out of the goodness of their heart to benefit their employer???
    workers do it because there is a benefit to the employer. They pay for their own training to seek a small reward from that employer. But it is the employer who always wins. There are people queuing up to spend hundreds or thousands of unpaid hours to learn skills that will satisfy some corporation — that's crazy.

    Often, this training pertains to a very specific skill in the industrial or financial sectors that the worker has no use for outside of his professional life. There is simply no excuse for this cost to be borne by the worker.




  • workers do it because there is a benefit to the employer. They pay for their own training to seek a small reward from that employer. But it is the employer who always wins. There are people queuing up to spend hundreds or thousands of unpaid hours to learn skills that will satisfy some corporation — that's crazy.

    Often, this training pertains to a very specific skill in the industrial or financial sectors that the worker has no use for outside of his professional life. There is simply no excuse for this cost to be borne by the worker.

    That would be fine if the skills were company specific. But many of these courses can be carried from one company to another. Do you think that a company A should pay for an employees education, and does not work during that period of study, and then decides to leave and join company B?




  • deravarra wrote: »
    That would be fine if the skills were company specific. But many of these courses can be carried from one company to another. Do you think that a company A should pay for an employees education, and does not work during that period of study, and then decides to leave and join company B?

    That happens all the time. Yes. My exams were paid for by an employer, and they paid for study time. Over in the healthcare industry, I'm pretty sure that doctors' training is all paid for on a non-committal basis. This is a lot more commonplace than people might expect.

    You should absolutely not be giving away your free time to make profits for some MNC




  • That happens all the time. Yes. My exams were paid for by an employer, and they paid for study time. Over in the healthcare industry, I'm pretty sure that doctors' training is all paid for on a non-committal basis. This is a lot more commonplace than people might expect.

    You should absolutely not be giving away your free time to make profits for some MNC

    So, you're saying that I should refuse to upskill and put myself in a better position education wise, unless my employer will pay for it and all while I do no work for them?

    The daftest thing I have ever heard.


  • Advertisement


  • Intel paid for your education as long as you passes your exams, if you leave within a year you pay back the last year of your course fees, why would employees not want to upskill in an industry that they enjoy working in, its a win win for everybody, this iindusty is continuesly changing so continues training happens all the time either in house training or doing these upskilling courses in college,




  • Still have a few issues with people leaving for better prospects and renumeration elsewhere, and even some cases of permanent contracts not being accepted (or offered in a small number of cases), so the job can sometimes not be suitable for everyone.
    Happens everywhere of course, especially in employment cultures of a similar ilk, but it can be a difficult early few years for some.
    They've always being a big supporter of people wishing to further their education, job relevant of course, so thats always been an important factor for many who have availed.

    Bottom line, there are far worse places to work.




  • fryup wrote: »
    sounds like they're the aldi/lidl of the manufacturing world
    Joe4321 wrote: »
    Aldi and lidl actually pay above the market rate

    yes, but they work the @rse off ya for it




  • Both aldi/lidl never seem to have problems getting staff, in fact both have given there staff generous bonus for working through this pandemic, a lot more that a lot of other business that have been here a lot longer,




  • McDermotX wrote: »
    Still have a few issues with people leaving for better prospects and renumeration elsewhere, and even some cases of permanent contracts not being accepted (or offered in a small number of cases), so the job can sometimes not be suitable for everyone.
    Happens everywhere of course, especially in employment cultures of a similar ilk, but it can be a difficult early few years for some.
    They've always being a big supporter of people wishing to further their education, job relevant of course, so thats always been an important factor for many who have availed.

    Bottom line, there are far worse places to work.

    I started my career there in 99 and can only say positive things about it, still have a lot of friends I started with there 20 years later. It gave me a great start and learnings for my future career.


  • Advertisement


  • fryup wrote: »
    yaaahhh lets all move to Leixlip

    what's it like working there anyway? as a production operative?


    I've done it.


    It's a pain in the whole. I lasted about 6 months. Some lads loved it but it was not for me.


    My job was to unpack boxes from the sophisticated train system they have, with wafers in them into another machine, and test them. Testing took 10 minutes. To start the test involved a complicated sequence of 3 key presses on a computer.

    If people think wearing PPE at work is a pain, you should try Intel's double layer space suit. That you have to put on twice a day and wear for 6 hours at a time.

    3 days on, 4 days off. The 4 days off was nice. I'm not knocking the job. Its hard work when you are working, but its even harder when you're not.

    To the people saying its moving to China tomorrow, dream on.

    P.S. Leixlip is a kip.




  • Leixlip used to be a good spot in the day when the hitcher and the ozone (and the accompanying pub) were there - both German supermarkets now. You’d be sweating buckets in the suit after a feed of it the night before. Ops weren’t too bad back in the old 8 inch days too, it was when it went to that rocc crap it all went downhill.




  • screamer wrote: »
    Are you being serious? There's tech people who have skills, qualifications and experience in the field, and wouldn't be earning 100K 5 years down the road.

    Anyways, the main reason Intel are here is government grants, and tax expediency of being located in the EU, that's it.

    The main reason intel are here is that it makes financial sense. For whatever reason but Id suggest that after investing Billions into plants and technology over the years on the country it would take a lot for them to up sticks.




  • fryup wrote: »
    yes, but they work the @rse off ya for it

    Intel really don't.




  • kippy wrote: »
    The main reason intel are here is that it makes financial sense. For whatever reason but Id suggest that after investing Billions into plants and technology over the years on the country it would take a lot for them to up sticks.

    Exactly.


    I love how many people are saying Intel stay for government grants. It’s hilarious. They’re building a fab that cost $7billion. Do people think the IDA are contributing to this is any significant ways? They are in their hoop.

    Intel moved to Ireland for many reasons. They stay for many reasons. Tax rate is important, but it it changed tomorrow they wouldn’t just leave.

    On the 20th anniversary they worked out that they’d spent $75 billion in Ireland. Wages, building and so on. What’s the budget of the IDA??




  • fryup wrote: »
    yes, but they work the @rse off ya for it

    +1 I never see their staff stand still, not a handy number at all I'd say.




  • Was always a story in there that it was in the contract that in exchange for grants they had to leave it back as the field it was before they came if they ever left, thus adding another huge cost to leaving. Now I would seriously doubt if (a) that’s even legal to do or (b) if anyone running anything here is intelligent enough to think of it if it were legal, so I’d be thinking myth.




  • +1 I never see their staff stand still, not a handy number at all I'd say.

    As big a myth as above. Their massive cohort of “engineers” only leave a desk to go to a meeting or the canteen for a start.




  • As big a myth as above. Their massive cohort of “engineers” only leave a desk to go to a meeting or the canteen for a start.

    The best thing about being a tech was that if all the machines were up there was nothing to do. Could be incredibly busy sometimes, but mostly it was grand. Plus I go to work to actually work, not look for a handy number to dodge work in.




  • Brian? wrote: »
    The best thing about being a tech was that if all the machines were up there was nothing to do. Could be incredibly busy sometimes, but mostly it was grand. Plus I go to work to actually work, not look for a handy number to dodge work in.

    True. You’d have PM’s or engineer work to do on days but that’s about it and there were loads of techs. Nights were extremely long if there wasn’t anything broken (and the plan was always for nothing to be broken), I’d much rather have been working myself so was hoping there would be breakdowns.


  • Advertisement


  • True. You’d have PM’s or engineer work to do on days but that’s about it and there were loads of techs. Nights were extremely long if there wasn’t anything broken (and the plan was always for nothing to be broken), I’d much rather have been working myself so was hoping there would be breakdowns.

    At one stage the decision was made to do all PMd on days in my last area. It was mind numbing at night.




  • Brian? wrote: »
    The best thing about being a tech was that if all the machines were up there was nothing to do. Could be incredibly busy sometimes, but mostly it was grand. Plus I go to work to actually work, not look for a handy number to dodge work in.

    I believe you stated that you were a manager of some description?




  • I believe you stated that you were a manager of some description?

    A huge amount of supervisors, GL’s, managers, etc in there would have started as techs. The company were great for clear development and progression plans so if you wanted to be a manager and hit the expectations laid out for you then it would be very unlikely not to end up one.




  • A huge amount of supervisors, GL’s, managers, etc in there would have started as techs. The company were great for clear development and progression plans so if you wanted to be a manager and hit the expectations laid out for you then it would be very unlikely not to end up one.

    Great stuff.




  • Great stuff.

    It was indeed. Everything laid out clearly and regular updates on progression if you wanted them. Many other companies could learn something from it.




  • A huge amount of supervisors, GL’s, managers, etc in there would have started as techs. The company were great for clear development and progression plans so if you wanted to be a manager and hit the expectations laid out for you then it would be very unlikely not to end up one.

    One thing I could never do - be a manager. The amount of childish behaviour of some employees there, and yet the manager would always have to toe the line in HR terms, and not tell ee's how foolish they were.




  • +1 I never see their staff stand still, not a handy number at all I'd say.

    In my area and most others that I know, we’re busy but wouldn’t say overly busy. The process is complicated and some tasks require a bit of thought, they would prefer you spent an extra 10 mins doing a task and being right instead of rushing it and getting it wrong. I’ve worked in other places that put output over safety and quality.




  • I believe you stated that you were a manager of some description?

    I was, after I was a tech. Why does it matter?




  • did many from HP migrate over to intel?


  • Advertisement
Advertisement