Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Intel

24567

Comments



  • INTEL is a great place to work. Good conditions and good wages.




  • SeanW wrote: »
    You think Sleepy Joe's going to stop them? China's best chance to take Taiwan is with Democrats in government. Love him or hate him, Trump was the first president to seriously recognise a danger in China.

    Almost 2 pages folks... Almost 2 full pages before it began.




  • There have been lots of jobs announced over the last week, Intel, Workday, Stripe. That's great and all but they ain't going to be employing people who lost their jobs in retail and hospitality. The jobs most likely will be sourced abroad, so the unemployment numbers will be unaffected and they are going to have to live somewhere, so rental prices will go zoooom.

    I remember when job announcements were a good thing. Now they fill me with dread. It's like Government are saying they don't want lowly non-skilled workers and we're replacing you with other people that work for trendy tech companies.


    Damn right.


    However dont worry, in a year or two they will announce just as many layoffs when their proffits are down. Its like a rollercoaster with intel. Hire them fire them, hire them fire them. Their announcements give me a headache.




  • There have been lots of jobs announced over the last week, Intel, Workday, Stripe. That's great and all but they ain't going to be employing people who lost their jobs in retail and hospitality. The jobs most likely will be sourced abroad.....

    ...... It's like Government are saying they don't want lowly non-skilled workers and we're replacing you with other people that work for trendy tech companies.


    Well, to the 2nd point first: It's not that they don't want us competing in the non-skilled on a global scale. It's that we simply can't compete. I worked as a skilled worker in an international tech manufacturing company in the late 90s - mid 2010s. But the majority of the jobs were semi-skilled so it went to China. As others have said, even China isn't cheap anymore. Said company moved to India and then Mexico (Or the other way around) and is now pretty much moving away from hardware altogether.

    As to the 2nd point. The company I am in now has had 3 or 4 jobs in my department over the last 2 years and each one was sourced from abroad. Not because of cost as they were paid the same going rate as they would have paid anyone. but simply because the people could not be found here. I was involved in the hiring and maybe 5% of the CVs were from Ireland.

    Of course many times people will need to upskill/go back to school/college in order to find new employment. I did and 2/3 of my team did. It's tough but it can be done.




  • Exactly, the days of going to college, getting a degree and job are gone, you need to keep up with the latest technologies and keep up skilling, even Intel required that a lot of its staff go back to college and upskill, as many of them did on their days of,


  • Advertisement


  • fryup wrote: »
    yaaahhh lets all move to Leixlip

    what's it like working there anyway? as a production operative?

    There aren’t any production operators anymore. Haven’t been for about 10 years.




  • All this talk of chips has me starving.

    In the semiconductor industry we don't call them chips.




  • L1011 wrote: »
    You absolutely do not transfer your latest semiconductor tech to a cheap economy that is going to be exceptionally open to industrial espionage

    Intel has a plant in China which makes end of life stuff.

    There are US laws that prevent companies from manufacturing the high tech stuff in China as it can be used on weapons systems etc.

    I worked there years ago. There was alot of nonsense around safety (I remember once they made a video that showed all of their highly qualified staff how to safely make a cup of tea without killing themselves :pac: ) but the money was good and the work was easy. Fairly unchallenging workplace tbh which is why I eventually left but for the right job I would go back.




  • There have been lots of jobs announced over the last week, Intel, Workday, Stripe. That's great and all but they ain't going to be employing people who lost their jobs in retail and hospitality. The jobs most likely will be sourced abroad, so the unemployment numbers will be unaffected and they are going to have to live somewhere, so rental prices will go zoooom.

    I remember when job announcements were a good thing. Now they fill me with dread. It's like Government are saying they don't want lowly non-skilled workers and we're replacing you with other people that work for trendy tech companies.

    Are you for real? These are all great news. The jobs will only be sourced abroad if there aren’t enough qualified Irish people to fill them. No one preferentially hires abroad.

    I work in the Netherlands, we get lots of Irish graduates coming to work here. There are plenty of Irish graduates for these jobs.




  • Papa_Bear wrote: »
    Damn right.


    However dont worry, in a year or two they will announce just as many layoffs when their proffits are down. Its like a rollercoaster with intel. Hire them fire them, hire them fire them. Their announcements give me a headache.

    When was the last time they laid people off? I know, I survived it. It was the only time they laid people off in Ireland. 1 time.

    They offered voluntary redundancies a couple of other times. Each time there were more volunteers than jobs to go. A mate of mine tried to take it twice over the years and was refused.


  • Advertisement


  • Irish_rat wrote: »
    In the semiconductor industry we don't call them chips.

    Yeah we do.




  • There is a lot of dangerous chemicals on that site and they do take safety very seriously, compared to some other manufacturing places Intel is right up there regarding safety,




  • And yes they do call them Chips




  • Irish_rat wrote: »
    In the semiconductor industry we don't call them chips.

    What do they call them: French fries, pommes frites?

    Depends which country your dining in, I suppose.




  • Joe4321 wrote: »
    Intel also has a plant in China, not doing there latest technologies as far as I know but still serving a large market, great to see this continued investment in this country

    Sold a few months ago to the Koreans. Political relations between the US and China are cooling down.




  • Fritzbox wrote: »
    What do they call them: French fries, pommes frites?

    Depends which country your dining in, I suppose.

    A chip's a chip, the just call it le chip




  • There have been lots of jobs announced over the last week, Intel, Workday, Stripe. That's great and all but they ain't going to be employing people who lost their jobs in retail and hospitality. The jobs most likely will be sourced abroad, so the unemployment numbers will be unaffected and they are going to have to live somewhere, so rental prices will go zoooom.

    I remember when job announcements were a good thing. Now they fill me with dread. It's like Government are saying they don't want lowly non-skilled workers and we're replacing you with other people that work for trendy tech companies.

    Any one who has the required qualifications can get these jobs, speaking from personal experience of having worked retail security and construction from the age of 15 to 25 and then moving to the I.T. industry. Good few lads that I worked with went into I.T. and other areas such as accountancy.

    If someone can't pass a course, or if they do and can't get a job in a specific sector that has plenty of open positions, that's on them no one else.




  • There have been lots of jobs announced over the last week, Intel, Workday, Stripe. That's great and all but they ain't going to be employing people who lost their jobs in retail and hospitality. The jobs most likely will be sourced abroad, so the unemployment numbers will be unaffected and they are going to have to live somewhere, so rental prices will go zoooom.

    I remember when job announcements were a good thing. Now they fill me with dread. It's like Government are saying they don't want lowly non-skilled workers and we're replacing you with other people that work for trendy tech companies.

    Why don't ya open a pub in a few months? Lot of pent-up demand, you can hire plenty in hospitality.




  • fryup wrote: »
    what's it like working there anyway? as a production operative?
    Brian? wrote: »
    There aren’t any production operators anymore. Haven’t been for about 10 years.

    so what would be the entry-level non-skilled job there ?




  • You need third level education, minimum


  • Advertisement


  • Joe4321 wrote: »
    You need third level education, minimum

    to make chips :confused:

    but seriously do all the roles require 3rd level ?




  • fryup wrote: »
    to make chips :confused:

    but seriously do all the roles require 3rd level ?

    Pretty much




  • c'mon, even the cleaners ?




  • Yes, it's not lot years ago, even staff that were there years who had not got any third level qualifications went back to college, they take a lot of graduates on but to get decent money going in you need to be experienced with third level behind you




  • fryup wrote: »
    c'mon, even the cleaners ?

    All contractors. They wouldn't be hired by Intel directly and the question was about roles making the silicon wafers




  • Fritzbox wrote: »
    What do they call them: French fries, pommes frites?

    Depends which country your dining in, I suppose.

    Freedom Wafers




  • Pawwed Rig wrote: »
    I worked there years ago. There was alot of nonsense around safety (I remember once they made a video that showed all of their highly qualified staff how to safely make a cup of tea without killing themselves :pac: ) but the money was good and the work was easy. Fairly unchallenging workplace tbh which is why I eventually left but for the right job I would go back.

    Yeah I did an internship there about ten years ago, safety definitely taken seriously. I remember one of my first few weeks driving into the staff car park I accidently went against a one-way flow to park the car in an empty space. A manager caught me doing it and reported me. To be fair, it's for this reason they can boast a world class safety record/culture and all the multinationals are getting to or at this stage already in terms of their safety systems. Sad to hear about there being no production operators nowadays, the lads there were nice when I worked there, enjoyed their work and were paid well.




  • fryup wrote: »
    so what would be the entry-level non-skilled job there ?

    Not to be facetious, in the canteen or as a cleaner.

    They used to hire operators to run the wafers through the factory. These days it’s all automated. The last time a lot of wafers had to be loaded manually onto a machine there was around April 2011.

    Everyone who works in manufacturing these days has a minimum of a L6 in engineering. Most have L7, some L8. They’re all skilled jobs.

    On 2nd thoughts, there are some non skilled jobs doing parts clean or delivering parts. But those aren’t intel staff. They’re contracted out.




  • Cake Man wrote: »
    Yeah I did an internship there about ten years ago, safety definitely taken seriously. I remember one of my first few weeks driving into the staff car park I accidently went against a one-way flow to park the car in an empty space. A manager caught me doing it and reported me. To be fair, it's for this reason they can boast a world class safety record/culture and all the multinationals are getting to or at this stage already in terms of their safety systems. Sad to hear about there being no production operators nowadays, the lads there were nice when I worked there, enjoyed their work and were paid well.

    A lot of those guys are still there working as technicians. Most had the opportunity to get the right qualifications, some already had them. There are plenty of lads in manufacturing well over 20 years. If I hadn’t left in 2018 I’d be there 20 years now. Started as an operator, changed to equipment technician and left as a shift group leader. Plenty of people followed a similar path.

    I never understood the people who worked as operators and never took any chance they were offered to get a qualification.


  • Advertisement


  • fryup wrote: »
    so what would be the entry-level non-skilled job there ?
    Brian? wrote: »
    Not to be facetious, in the canteen or as a cleaner.

    well that way i could make chips of my own ;)


Advertisement