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Brexit Impact on Northern Ireland

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  • Registered Users Posts: 67,286 ✭✭✭✭FrancieBrady


    Because it has no place in Ireland and it would be a regression to go back to it.

    I agree the hate and triumphalist part has no place, but the rest of it is fairly inocuous stuff.
    I think I'm over 1690. :)


  • Posts: 7,712 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I agree the hate and triumphalist part has no place, but the rest of it is fairly inocuous stuff.

    The hate and triumphalist part is the only part.


  • Registered Users Posts: 67,286 ✭✭✭✭FrancieBrady


    They’re not a portion of the population of Ireland though and hopefully never will be.

    I’d still be fairly confident that the Irish will see sense when the truth comes out in an actual referendum, though we do need some brave party to step up and do what’s best in running a proper No campaign.

    None of the major parties will, and there is a reason for that. It would be political suicide.
    All of them could cope with being on a losing side as there would be another chance in a few years. Would they ever recover being on the NO side if a poll succeeded though?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,987 ✭✭✭bilbot79


    They’re not a portion of the population of Ireland though and hopefully never will be.

    I’d still be fairly confident that the Irish will see sense when the truth comes out in an actual referendum, though we do need some brave party to step up and do what’s best in running a proper No campaign.

    An Irish unification 'No' campaign. Yes I can't wait to see which politicians offer themselves up to an act of political suicide with implications for their actual safety


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    They’re not a portion of the population of Ireland though and hopefully never will be.

    I’d still be fairly confident that the Irish will see sense when the truth comes out in an actual referendum, though we do need some brave party to step up and do what’s best in running a proper No campaign.

    Personally, I don't care if there's never a United Ireland, I think they should stand alone.
    But, if the majority vote for it then we need to be inclusive and work together, looking forward, not back.


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  • Posts: 7,712 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Personally, I don't care if there's never a United Ireland, I think they should stand alone.
    But, if the majority vote for it then we need to be inclusive and work together, looking forward, not back.

    There will be nothing only regression by trying to incorporate the likes of these people into our country.

    I still think the truth of what it would mean economically will ensure sense prevails anyway. Also the small matter that we’d be rolling Ireland up and throwing it away by merging with them. A sickening thought for a country that was so hard fought for in the first place.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,987 ✭✭✭bilbot79


    Certain groups literally burn it every year, they are not going to accept it.

    If say the flag could have a mini union jack in the corner like new zealand


  • Registered Users Posts: 67,286 ✭✭✭✭FrancieBrady


    There will be nothing only regression by trying to incorporate the likes of these people into our country.

    I still think the truth of what it would mean economically will ensure sense prevails anyway. Also the small matter that we’d be rolling Ireland up and throwing it away by merging with them. A sickening thought for a country that was so hard fought for in the first place.

    I think those fighting were fighting for the 'whole' country.


  • Posts: 18,749 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    There will be nothing only regression by trying to incorporate the likes of these people into our country.

    I still think the truth of what it would mean economically will ensure sense prevails anyway. Also the small matter that we’d be rolling Ireland up and throwing it away by merging with them. A sickening thought for a country that was so hard fought for in the first place.

    Northern Ireland may do very well economically from brexit.
    Also, 'these people' are just people, how do you feel about immigration in general?


  • Posts: 7,712 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I think those fighting were fighting for the 'whole' country.

    We got a whole country out of it - Ireland. So what if a bit of land didn’t become part of it? Scotland didn’t either, nor did the north west of England, it amounts to the same thing - Ireland broke free from the UK. The Northern Irish, both sides of the community, have become closer to Scottish than Irish as people anyway. Maybe there’s a more fitting merger there instead.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 67,286 ✭✭✭✭FrancieBrady


    We got a whole country out of it - Ireland. So what if a bit of land didn’t become part of it? Scotland didn’t either, nor did the north west of England, it amounts to the same thing - Ireland broke free from the UK. The Northern Irish, both sides of the community, have become closer to Scottish than Irish as people anyway. Maybe there’s a more fitting merger there instead.

    That is just plain nonsense. The Scottish connection is tenuous and was only really pushed as recently as 1998. It was a strategy of the likes of David Trimble to up the connection. It doesn't really exist at all, and is non existent on the nationalist side. Not as a feasible unity thing anyway.
    Here in Monaghan I have far more in common with my Fermanagh Tyrone neighbours and members of my family there than I have with Dublin or Cork people.
    Which is natural in any country or island.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,543 ✭✭✭Charles Babbage


    bilbot79 wrote: »
    I know it's a little bit 'ethnic cleansy' but I reckon if the Irish government sponsored every unionist who renounced Irish/Northern Irish citizenship say 25k to help with a deposit on a house in the UK everyone would be a winner.

    London should pay for unionists to go to Scotland, which would ensure two united islands.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,301 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    London should pay for unionists to go to Scotland, which would ensure two united islands.

    London doesn't want a united island in Britain anymore. Even if every single one of the 800,000 protestants in NI moved to Scotland, that would probably still be insufficient to prevent Scottish independence at this stage.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,433 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    cgcsb wrote: »
    London doesn't want a united island in Britain anymore. Even if every single one of the 800,000 protestants in NI moved to Scotland, that would probably still be insufficient to prevent Scottish independence at this stage.

    Would anyone wish such a thing on anyone?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,301 ✭✭✭cgcsb


    Would anyone wish such a thing on anyone?

    Well that's how we got the plantation of Ulster. Good for the goose.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Because it has no place in Ireland and it would be a regression to go back to it.

    Parity of esteem would be very much part of a United Ireland, unless you are proposing the Irish government break the good Friday agreement.


  • Registered Users Posts: 67,286 ✭✭✭✭FrancieBrady


    Aegir wrote: »
    Parity of esteem would be very much part of a United Ireland, unless you are proposing the Irish government break the good Friday agreement.

    That is a two way street, Belligerence will find no parity in a UI. Democrats will, of all hues and creeds.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 105 ✭✭Wilhelm III


    I think the Unionists from Northern Ireland will be much easier to persuade - than the many Unionists from the Republic of Ireland, whom I fear are a much larger number.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 105 ✭✭Wilhelm III


    They’re not a portion of the population of Ireland though and hopefully never will be.
    They are literally a portion of the population of Ireland, Ireland is an island - they may not be a part of the population of the Republic of Ireland, but they are a part of Ireland's population - the same way the Scottish and Welsh are part of Britain's (the name of the island) population.
    I’d still be fairly confident that the Irish will see sense when the truth comes out in an actual referendum, though we do need some brave party to step up and do what’s best in running a proper No campaign.
    Agree AGAIN Reggie!! I too am confident that the Irish will see sense, when the truth comes out in an actual referendum!!! We can NOT stop agreeing – I LOVE IT!!! Changing hearts and changing minds Reggie - one heart at a time, let's do it - let's unite this country together!!! :) !!!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,869 ✭✭✭✭breezy1985


    Amirani wrote: »
    Remember the uproar about the RIC commemoration? We'd be having loads of unpopular commemorations.

    How would people feel about having an official holiday on the 12th of July and Orange bands marching down O'Connell Street?

    Well the 12th isn't a holiday in London and there isn't a march down Oxford st.
    Some countries have regional holidays so no reason NI cant in a united Ireland


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  • Posts: 7,712 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    They are literally a portion of the population of Ireland, Ireland is an island - they may not be a part of the population of the Republic of Ireland, but they are a part of Ireland's population - the same way the Scottish and Welsh are part of Britain's (the name of the island) population.


    Agree AGAIN Reggie!! I too am confident that the Irish will see sense, when the truth comes out in an actual referendum!!! We can NOT stop agreeing – I LOVE IT!!! Changing hearts and changing minds Reggie - one heart at a time, let's do it - let's unite this country together!!! :) !!!!

    I’ve learned not to get into arguments here about the name of this country with people that don’t seem to want to know it, or worse.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 105 ✭✭Wilhelm III


    I’ve learned not to get into arguments here about the name of this country with people that don’t seem to want to know it, or worse.
    I do accept the Republic of Ireland's alternative and equally official name is simply 'Ireland', however it is indeed the name of the entire island also!


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,869 ✭✭✭✭breezy1985


    I don't disagree - I just have a feeling a lot of our friends in the North would have a serious aversion to the Tricolour, I fear they don't even SEE the colour orange on there, in theory you couldn't get a more appropriate flag - in reality, I fear that is viewed in some quarters as a symbol of the enemy. Ultimately - to me, speaking personally - a unified Republic of Ireland is more important than the flag which will represent it, as much as I love dearly our flag.

    BUT HEY! I like to keep an open mind! It might be the case that a REAL and public discussion on this topic, when the time comes - might indeed change minds, and win hearts - with regards to the already, simplistically profound symbolism of the Irish flag, the flag might not need changing at all. Whatever the case is - we will want to make sure those joining us WANT to join us, that they WANT to be a part of the country - that they WANT a seat at the table - otherwise, how will it ever succeed? The path to peace is paved in compromise, understanding, respect for each other, trust and goodwill from all involved - and if that means a new flag, one that we can all agree on, and get behind - then as far as I am concerned – so be it.

    Oh – and Shamrock!? Come on!?!? The Shamrock would be a quality flag!

    During the NZ flag referendum they had some nice ones using ferns or Maori symbols so maybe we could do similar with shamrocks or Celtic spirals.
    Anything but that boring yoke the rugby use


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,246 ✭✭✭✭Dyr


    breezy1985 wrote: »
    During the NZ flag referendum they had some nice ones using ferns or Maori symbols so maybe we could do similar with shamrocks or Celtic spirals.
    Anything but that boring yoke the rugby use

    No ****ing around with some modern marketing graphic design bollox like New Zealand. Old school design. Green background, orange celtic cross over a white border in the shape of the cross seperating the green and orange. Job done. Looks a bit like the Union Jack and fairly right wing so the Unionists will be grand with it.

    Change the English lyrics to the National Anthem to be some ambigious reference sto unity rather than shooting the Brits and job done.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,433 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    One of Ireland's discoveries/inventions was the 'Citizen's Assembly' that was used to settle the hardest of all political issues of the last 40 years, and surprisingly (to he vast percentage of he Irish population), they did exactly that. They came up with the formula that fixed for all time the conundrum that was abortion.

    Now that would be a formula that could be used to solve the unification question.

    It is surprising that a combination of normal people, when the issues are put to them by experts, and those experts can be questioned until those normal people have a good grasp of those issues, and then those normal people discuss among themselves and, as a group, come to possible solutions, and then proposals.

    However they did and their proposals got a huge majority of the population to agree with that Citizen's Assembly.

    Amazing. Perhaps it is a solution to a United Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,869 ✭✭✭✭breezy1985


    One of Ireland's discoveries/inventions was the 'Citizen's Assembly' that was used to settle the hardest of all political issues of the last 40 years, and surprisingly (to he vast percentage of he Irish population), they did exactly that. They came up with the formula that fixed for all time the conundrum that was abortion.

    Now that would be a formula that could be used to solve the unification question.

    It is surprising that a combination of normal people, when the issues are put to them by experts, and those experts can be questioned until those normal people have a good grasp of those issues, and then those normal people discuss among themselves and, as a group, come to possible solutions, and then proposals.

    However they did and their proposals got a huge majority of the population to agree with that Citizen's Assembly.

    Amazing. Perhaps it is a solution to a United Ireland.

    As long as no one on boards is asked for solutions I think we will be fine


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,433 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    breezy1985 wrote: »
    As long as no one on boards is asked for solutions I think we will be fine

    Well, if they use the same type of selection system, only one boardsie would be selected, so we will be safe. Hopefully, the one voice will not be a troll.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,555 ✭✭✭20silkcut


    One of Ireland's discoveries/inventions was the 'Citizen's Assembly' that was used to settle the hardest of all political issues of the last 40 years, and surprisingly (to he vast percentage of he Irish population), they did exactly that. They came up with the formula that fixed for all time the conundrum that was abortion.

    Now that would be a formula that could be used to solve the unification question.

    It is surprising that a combination of normal people, when the issues are put to them by experts, and those experts can be questioned until those normal people have a good grasp of those issues, and then those normal people discuss among themselves and, as a group, come to possible solutions, and then proposals.

    However they did and their proposals got a huge majority of the population to agree with that Citizen's Assembly.

    Amazing. Perhaps it is a solution to a United Ireland.


    Yes the wisdom of crowds is often more correct than that of experts.

    That’s why ask the audience was the best lifeline on who wants to be a millionaire.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 19,433 Mod ✭✭✭✭Sam Russell


    20silkcut wrote: »
    Yes the wisdom of crowds is often more correct than that of experts.

    That’s why ask the audience was the best lifeline on who wants to be a millionaire.

    Is that not the basic idea behind democracy - the voice of the people?

    However, the Citizen's Assembly is an informed crowd - informed by experts. Democracy has got a bit of a wobble in recent times because of 'fake news' and deliberate perversion by rich vested interests.

    The whole point about the CA is it is informed by accepted experts and they inform participants with straightforward facts and information needed to understand the issues. Complex issues need a lot of detail and nuance to get to the basic solutions that will work, and the participants work through this be logical argument and discussion.

    Participants are chosen to be representative of the whole population - that is important.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,555 ✭✭✭20silkcut


    Is that not the basic idea behind democracy - the voice of the people?

    However, the Citizen's Assembly is an informed crowd - informed by experts. Democracy has got a bit of a wobble in recent times because of 'fake news' and deliberate perversion by rich vested interests.

    The whole point about the CA is it is informed by accepted experts and they inform participants with straightforward facts and information needed to understand the issues. Complex issues need a lot of detail and nuance to get to the basic solutions that will work, and the participants work through this be logical argument and discussion.

    Participants are chosen to be representative of the whole population - that is important.

    Yes it would have to be an unbiased representation of the population.

    Interestingly enough in the wisdom of the crowd theory answers are more accurate when extremely wrong answers are included to calculate the average answer.
    So having people with extreme views on the CA is probably no bad thing providing they don’t influence the crowd.


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