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The Pinter homebrew

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Comments



  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    Absolutely yes you can.

    Example needed




  • Example needed

    Buy malt in bulk or through a group buy, 4-4.5kg of Maris otter, 50 grams of home grown hops, get 21/22 litres post boil. Put it onto the trub of a previous brew and it will be very close to 10c for a pint.
    Won’t be very strong or complex but will certainly be drinkable, a nice simple session ale.




  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    I regularly have beer ready in 2 weeks using corny kegs. Not that difficult really.
    That's a cool product, never knew about it. I'm still brewing the old fashioned way. How does it handle the carbonation without exploding?

    I don't want to spend money on new equipment this season, but it's definitely on my radar now. Is the finished product after two weeks as good as other longer fermentation homebrew you've had?




  • That's a cool product, never knew about it. I'm still brewing the old fashioned way. How does it handle the carbonation without exploding?

    I don't want to spend money on new equipment this season, but it's definitely on my radar now. Is the finished product after two weeks as good as other longer fermentation homebrew you've had?

    I ferment imagine a normal fermenter with S04 yeast, it’s fast and clean, it will ferment out in about 7-9 days, cold crash for a couple of days then into the keg to carbonate for 2-3 days before it’s ready to serve. If you use a pressure fermenter you can take 2-3 days off that too.
    Carbonation using bottled co2 is a lot quicker than bottle conditioning.




  • 10c a pint? No chance

    Buy buying everything from frugal sources (club yeast buy, malt direct, low amounts of hops) and avoiding postage costs:
    25Kg malt ~22e
    100g hopa ~5e
    yeast ~10e

    I use half the sack of malt to make 55L beer, so 26e so about 24c per 500ml.

    If I pitch onto a yeast cake, and I am not fussy about hops (use the freebies) : 10c per 500ml.

    Its rare that I would try for cheapness (the effort is a lot, might as well throw in some nice fresh hops etc.) but if I want to, there are a lot of classic beer styles that you can make for not much money.

    I definitely have made good beer (reusing yeast, hop bulk buys) close to 10-15c per 500ml dispense.


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  • Tbf you have to leave homebrewed beer mature for a lot longer than two weeks. I would say three months is the absolute minimum.

    The professionals go from grain to glass in under 2 weeks. I know many homebrewers who can do this turnaround in a week, and make good beer in that time frame. Certain styles and yeasts of course.




  • Garibaldi? wrote: »
    What is the alcohol content of this product? Seems very quick to make!

    The American Pale Ale is 4.5%. IPA is 4.2%.

    I bought a Pinter for my husband and he loves it. Hasn’t used it in a couple of months though as I got peed off with the amount of space it’s taken up in the fridge. Saving for an American style fridge then he can put the old one in his garage. Need to restock and also buy the extra cask so can have one brewing and one drinking.

    Luckily I live beside the border so get free delivery to Northern Ireland and no vat and customs to pay. Ssshhhh ;)




  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    I ferment imagine a normal fermenter with S04 yeast, it’s fast and clean, it will ferment out in about 7-9 days, cold crash for a couple of days then into the keg to carbonate for 2-3 days before it’s ready to serve. If you use a pressure fermenter you can take 2-3 days off that too.
    Carbonation using bottled co2 is a lot quicker than bottle conditioning.

    Even bottle conditioning you can turn out a decent beer in a 3 weeks; 10 days in the fermenter, 10 days in the bottle (quicker again if you're using Kveik yeast). Darker beers do benefit from longer in the bottle.




  • loyatemu wrote: »
    Even bottle conditioning you can turn out a decent beer in a 3 weeks; 10 days in the fermenter, 10 days in the bottle (quicker again if you're using Kveik yeast). Darker beers do benefit from longer in the bottle.

    You can't do *every* beer style this quick - but I dont think anyone in this thread has suggested that - but there are a wide range of styles where you can go grain to glass in 1-3 weeks.

    I have gotten bottle conditioned beers into competitions in 14 days, pitch to judging. Didn't place, but it got close, and it was a porter.




  • sharingan wrote: »
    close to 10-15c per 500ml dispense.

    10c per 500ml = 11.40c per pint
    15c per 500ml = 17.00c per pint

    Getting "close to" those figures implies that it'll end up costing even more more.

    I'm not saying it ain't cheap, but he was right to query the "10c per pint" claim when nobody has been able to back that claim up so far.


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  • Going to order my Pinter and Co Pinter at the end of the month.

    The 2 units and 2 mixes does come to 130 GBP so not too cheap - then it will be a case of using addresspal and prob another 30 euro vat/import.

    Its a pretty expensive little job but the do look good and are pretty clean and tidy. Guess if i use it enough it will work out a bit cheaper.


    Definitely more a fun toy than value homebrew job. They have a facebook page that gives loads of tips for getting more out of the unit - adding extras etc. So will keep me going for a while.




  • $hifty wrote: »
    10c per 500ml = 11.40c per pint
    15c per 500ml = 17.00c per pint

    Getting "close to" those figures implies that it'll end up costing even more more.

    I'm not saying it ain't cheap, but he was right to query the "10c per pint" claim when nobody has been able to back that claim up so far.

    Seriously?

    It absolutely has been shown it can be done.

    If you wish to you could make it for even less.




  • It most certainly has not been shown. The lowest we've gotten to is between 10c and 15c per 500ml. That is between 14% and 70% more expensive than the claim which was made and ridiculed.




  • $hifty wrote: »
    It most certainly has not been shown. The lowest we've gotten to is between 10c and 15c per 500ml. That is between 14% and 70% more expensive than the claim which was made and ridiculed.

    If you don’t understand how myself and others have explained it then I’d be happy to elaborate.

    Actually, before I do, can you just let us know if you have any experience with home brew or not?




  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    If you don’t understand how myself and others have explained it then I’d be happy to elaborate.

    Actually, before I do, can you just let us know if you have any experience with home brew or not?

    Kits only, I've no experience with the full grain method. I'd be delighted to hear that elaboration, please.




  • $hifty wrote: »
    Kits only, I've no experience with the full grain method. I'd be delighted to hear that elaboration, please.

    I’ll forgive you for not understanding the concept but please show me where my claims are ridiculed?

    If you’re only using kits then you’re probably only at this a wet week so less of the arrogance would be appreciated (there’s nothing wrong with kits btw).

    Since you’ve proven to be so good at maths already then surely you should understand that the cost of a pint will be based on a price per unit volume, from there it’s a simple dilution factor to get your cost below your target.

    As I’ve said before, I’ve made beer for very close to 10c/litre, I have no desire to make it cheaper but I (and any homebrewer) absolutely have the ability. Yes, as stated before, the beer will not be very strong or be bursting with flavour, but it will still likely hold its own against a mass market lager.




  • Seriously lads, tone down the snark. Ye're sucking the fun out of what should be an enjoyable hobby.




  • BeerNut wrote: »
    Seriously lads, tone down the snark. Ye're sucking the fun out of what should be an enjoyable hobby.

    I honestly don't see how what I've posted already could be seen as snarky in any way possible, but I know where you're coming from. I will be bowing out of this thread after this post anyway, so don't worry.
    Bogwoppit wrote: »
    I’ll forgive you for not understanding the concept but please show me where my claims are ridiculed?

    I understand the concept pretty well, believe it or not. What I don't understand is you making a claim, being challenged, then refusing to provide anything to back that claim up and telling others you'll elaborate on your figures, but then refusing to do so. You are now getting all condescending towards me when I flagged that you haven't backed it up.........case in point:
    If you’re only using kits then you’re probably only at this a wet week so less of the arrogance would be appreciated (there’s nothing wrong with kits btw).

    Childish, puerile nonsense. "not that there's anything wrong with that" is the hallmark of someone who thinks that, yes, there is in fact something wrong with that, in their eyes. Like a priest talking about gay people or something.
    Since you’ve proven to be so good at maths already then surely you should understand that the cost of a pint will be based on a price per unit volume, from there it’s a simple dilution factor to get your cost below your target.

    Since YOU'RE so good at maths, please tell me how "close to 15c per 500nl dispensed" equates to 10c per pint?
    As I’ve said before, I’ve made beer for very close to 10c/litre, I have no desire to make it cheaper but I (and any homebrewer) absolutely have the ability. Yes, as stated before, the beer will not be very strong or be bursting with flavour, but it will still likely hold its own against a mass market lager.

    Not once in this thread has anybody mentioned 10c/Litre until now. Nobody has even shown how it can be produced for 10c per pint yet. Despite your protestations and your promises to elaborate, you are included in this group. It may well be possible, of that I'm certain. My point was that nobody has demonstrated it so far.




  • $hifty wrote: »
    I honestly don't see how what I've posted already could be seen as snarky in any way possible, but I know where you're coming from. I will be bowing out of this thread after this post anyway, so don't worry.



    I understand the concept pretty well, believe it or not. What I don't understand is you making a claim, being challenged, then refusing to provide anything to back that claim up and telling others you'll elaborate on your figures, but then refusing to do so. You are now getting all condescending towards me when I flagged that you haven't backed it up.........case in point:



    Childish, puerile nonsense. "not that there's anything wrong with that" is the hallmark of someone who thinks that, yes, there is in fact something wrong with that, in their eyes. Like a priest talking about gay people or something.



    Since YOU'RE so good at maths, please tell me how "close to 15c per 500nl dispensed" equates to 10c per pint?



    Not once in this thread has anybody mentioned 10c/Litre until now. Nobody has even shown how it can be produced for 10c per pint yet. Despite your protestations and your promises to elaborate, you are included in this group. It may well be possible, of that I'm certain. My point was that nobody has demonstrated it so far.


    Ok, at the risk of annoying everybody (apologies beernut) I will reply once more.

    Let’s try reduce the confrontation a little.

    How it can be done has been posted more than once, unfortunately I don’t think you’re understanding the process. To reduce the cost it’s simply a case of dilution factor, fix the cost for input (I’ve already posted how it’s possible to get an ingredients list for €5), increase the post boil volume to 29 litres (I’ve done the maths this time), will allow for some wastage, voila, pints for under 10c. This is what I was referring to with dilution factor.
    Adjusting profiles in this way is common practice for all grain so I made an assumption early on that others could figure out how it’s done from the original recipe I posted.

    The 10c/litre was a typo, meant to type pint, apologies for the confusion.

    I don’t engage in childish puerile nonsense as you say, if that’s how you took my comments then that is an issue for you, not me. I regularly do kit brews alongside all grain as they have their advantages with ease of use and short brew days when time is tight.




  • Seeing as my figures were quoted:
    Bu(l)y buying everything from frugal sources (club yeast buy, malt direct, low amounts of hops) and avoiding postage costs:
    25Kg malt ~22e
    100g hopa ~5e
    yeast ~10e

    I use half the sack of malt to make 55L beer, so 26e so about 24c per 500ml.

    If I pitch onto a yeast cake, and I am not fussy about hops (use the freebies) : 10c per 500ml.

    ...

    I definitely have made good beer (reusing yeast, hop bulk buys) close to 10-15c per 500ml dispense.

    the 10c - 15c figure is based on the fact that I assumed the reader could work a calculator to do price per pint. The key figures are 11euro +5 euro makes you 55L of ~ 4.5-5% beer.

    It is based on using cheap hops, < 2g/L. And that you are circumventing courier costs with club group buys etc.

    If you go super cheap, and dilute further (halve the hops, scale back the malt to 10Kg)

    Malt = 8.8 euro.
    Hops = 2.5 euro

    You are going to end up with ~4% beer. Pitch onto a yeast cake/yeast slurry. So you have 55L of beer for 11.3 euro now.

    11.3 / 55000 * 568 = 0.116 c per **pint**

    You just need to drop 1.5e off your total ingredients cost to get down to 10c per pint. You will have a light blonde ale at ~3.3 - 3.7%. Well made, still drinkable, and it can be stronger with the right skills, so you may not need to be so ruthless with ingredients.

    But this is an exercise in trying to reach a ludicrously low price point. If taken seriously this is penny-wise pound foolish. That extra 1.50 makes a big difference to the entire batch of the final product.

    I dont factor in one off costs or non-direct costs in the making here obviously. It might be worth factoring in crown caps or co2 costs aswell if you go down that route of bottling or kegging. But I would not add in the costs fo the kegs themselves, or the boiler.

    The point here, is that for a wide variety of home brewed beer from raw ingredients, you can make it quite cheaply. Some indulgent styles have very high (comparitively ) ingredient costs, some have long process times (e.g. extended lagering will require refrigeration).


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  • Or to summarise:

    10c per pint is doable with skill, yeast management, access to bulk buying of resources (bulk rates, AND skipping courier charges). You wont do it for all beer styles, and the beer will be low in strength.

    I have ignored other direct costs, such as finings, sanitiser, cleaning products, yeast nutrient etc. They wont add much, but its possible to forego them

    Raising this per-pint figure opens up the types of styles that can be attempted, the strength, and lets you put in more flavourful/indulgent options. 25c .. 50c per pint etc. We are still talking cheaper than the super saver veg section in Lidl.

    Even when you are being indulgent, your per-pint cost is a small fraction of the equivalent in the supermarket. And still way short of the consumable cost of the Pinter system (which in some cases is even higher than the equivalent supermarket product).




  • sharingan wrote: »
    Or to summarise:

    10c per pint is doable with skill, yeast management, access to bulk buying of resources (bulk rates, AND skipping courier charges). You wont do it for all beer styles, and the beer will be low in strength.

    I have ignored other direct costs, such as finings, sanitiser, cleaning products, yeast nutrient etc. They wont add much, but its possible to forego them

    Raising this per-pint figure opens up the types of styles that can be attempted, the strength, and lets you put in more flavourful/indulgent options. 25c .. 50c per pint etc. We are still talking cheaper than the super saver veg section in Lidl.

    Even when you are being indulgent, your per-pint cost is a small fraction of the equivalent in the supermarket. And still way short of the consumable cost of the Pinter system (which in some cases is even higher than the equivalent supermarket product).

    In fairness to the Pinter (as someone about to get one) it seems an entry level way to make homebrew with little mess or fuss.

    More entertainment than effective cost cutting - It will work out as the cost of about 100 bottles of fraziskaner for kit and stuff to make 20 pints, then almost a euro a pint (once shipping added) for follow on brews.

    Prob won't taste as good either but doubt its aimed at the serious homebrew market




  • In fairness to the Pinter (as someone about to get one) it seems an entry level way to make homebrew with little mess or fuss.

    More entertainment than effective cost cutting - It will work out as the cost of about 100 bottles of fraziskaner for kit and stuff to make 20 pints, then almost a euro a pint (once shipping added) for follow on brews.

    I think someone has already done a cost analysis and the price per pint is a lot higher like 1.50+? I feel this discussion has gone full circle.




  • Not to mention off topic. Pinter-related posts only, please.




  • In fairness to the Pinter (as someone about to get one) it seems an entry level way to make homebrew with little mess or fuss.

    More entertainment than effective cost cutting - It will work out as the cost of about 100 bottles of fraziskaner for kit and stuff to make 20 pints, then almost a euro a pint (once shipping added) for follow on brews.

    Prob won't taste as good either but doubt its aimed at the serious homebrew market

    Think this is it in a nutshell.

    If you are going to buy a Pinter (and I did), you are not buying it because you want to save money.

    You are buy-in it because you can't be bothered with the complex kerfuffle that goes with what someone up the page called "real" home brewing.

    Happy with my Pinter - so far at least.




  • Got the pinter last month.
    For time and effort I don't like it. Results are hit and miss
    The area that it is left to ferment has to stay around 18 degrees. Any variance causes poor results.
    Space taken up in fridge for cold crashes and conditioning
    I live in Limerick. I am selling it for 60 euro, as new, used twice




  • Wait, it doesn't have temp control? That would have made it a tempting combination of convenience and reliability. I have invested heavily in a homebrew setup (probably close to 2.5k) and while I love the ~5hr brew day process, I am keen to find something cheap that allows me to 'set-and-forget' to test new recipes before scaling them up to 23L or so. Not that the Pinter is suited to that anyway.




  • boetstark wrote: »
    Got the pinter last month.
    For time and effort I don't like it. Results are hit and miss
    The area that it is left to ferment has to stay around 18 degrees. Any variance causes poor results.
    Space taken up in fridge for cold crashes and conditioning
    I live in Limerick. I am selling it for 60 euro, as new, used twice

    Have you sold this ?




  • Daeltaja wrote: »
    Wait, it doesn't have temp control? That would have made it a tempting combination of convenience and reliability. I have invested heavily in a homebrew setup (probably close to 2.5k) and while I love the ~5hr brew day process, I am keen to find something cheap that allows me to 'set-and-forget' to test new recipes before scaling them up to 23L or so. Not that the Pinter is suited to that anyway.

    You are not going to get anything cheap that has integrated temp control. The pinter, and most entry level kit/home brew setups are aimed at novice brewers with relaxed expectations about the final product.

    You could improve the results a lot with a 2nd hand fridge and an inkbird + tube heater. But if you go that far, you might as well go the route of fermenting in a cornelius keg too (with spunding valve & float tube). Probably wont cost more than the pinter setup, and it will do the same thing (ferment & serve from the same vessel). One of the key attractions of the pinter setup is simplified dispense (no bottling, no kegs, no regulators/co2). And you get most of that with the corny setup (which will need a regulator & gas).


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  • My experience with the Pinter's makers, The Greater Good Brewing Company, has not been great.

    First batch of beer I made with the original unit was OK, so I went ahead and bought a co-Pinter (spare barrel) and three brewing kits to lay down stocks for Euro 2020

    Unfortunately, while the co-Pinter arrived, only one of the brewing kits did and this promptly burst (a fairly common problem according to Trust Pilot consumer site). \

    Subsequently had no end of problems getting the Greater Good Brewing Company to sort matters out regarding the two kits that failed to arrive.

    The worst thing about the company is that, rather than consolidate everything in one batch, they break down orders into individual items.

    If the E6.50 An Post Address Pal delivery charge for each item isn't bad enough, Greater Good frequently print the full value of shipments on the individual item packages meaning that you may have to pay customs charges more than once

    Given the e26 I paid in An Post delivery fees and the E34 I paid in customs charges (E19 of it a duplicate charge) my outgoings for a pinter brewing unit, spare barrel and four kits came to E242 - about E6 per pint.

    While that cost will obviously drop when - actually more a case of if - I order and brew more kits, you'll still be way better off buying booze in the pub or offie


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