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The Pinter homebrew

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 35 Father Frisky


    Has anyone got this yet or tried it. I've mine on order, had to use parcel motel. I hope to have it Monday and hopefully be supping pints by next weekend

    Can't post link but website is thegreatergood.co.uk

    Got a good write up in the times uk.


«1

Comments



  • Has anyone got this yet or tried it. I've mine on order, had to use parcel motel. I hope to have it Monday and hopefully be supping pints by next weekend

    Can't post link but website is thegreatergood.co.uk

    Got a good write up in the times uk.

    Looks like a tidy system but 10 pints for €15 plus whatever the delivery would be?
    I'm happy to wait longer for my 40 pints.




  • is this a revamped of the beer machine ?
    also cashing in on the torpedo market.
    still a big outlay for a system that isnt adaptable and you are tied to their refills at $13 for 10 pints? madness /gimmick.




  • looks very neat - presumably you could make your own wort if you want to and just use the Pinter for fermenting and serving. My concern would be how long the beer would stay fresh as each time you pull a pint you're allowing air into the vessel (it's basically a cask). It's a shame there's no way of attaching a CO2 bulb to turn it into a keg.




  • Anyone got one of these yet?

    Was it worth getting?




  • hkjohn wrote: »
    Anyone got one of these yet?

    Was it worth getting?

    Just to follow up on this. I got it and was very happy with it. Have only used it twice tho, made their american IPA and a pilsner. The ipa was lovely and would definitely do again. The only catch is they don't deliver to ireland yet so was using parcel wizard which adds to the cost


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  • Just to follow up on this. I got it and was very happy with it. Have only used it twice tho, made their american IPA and a pilsner. The ipa was lovely and would definitely do again. The only catch is they don't deliver to ireland yet so was using parcel wizard which adds to the cost

    Cheers for the feedback.




  • Its quite a lot to pay in terms of consumables, with your per-litre cost in excess of supermarket prices for equivalent product.

    Not sure how it works with regard to air exposure - do you vent it to draw a glass, or is all the CO2 contained in the vessel to allow you to serve? You are going to get quite a bit of variation from froth to flat from pint 1 to pint last. I am thinking you could ferment in a cornelius keg with standard kit beers, and serve from them with a few small extra parts (floating dip tube, spunding valve, picnic tap).




  • I don’t really get what advantage this kit gives you over a regular kit and a fermenter?
    Less work maybe, but not much I imagine. The finished product would have to be inferior with the pinter, the cost of the kits is extortionate too!

    If you want to pretend you’re homebrewing then maybe yes, but if you’re wanting to home brew then just do regular kits.

    Am I missing something?




  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    I don’t really get what advantage this kit gives you over a regular kit and a fermenter?
    Less work maybe, but not much I imagine. The finished product would have to be inferior with the pinter, the cost of the kits is extortionate too!

    If you want to pretend you’re homebrewing then maybe yes, but if you’re wanting to home brew then just do regular kits.

    Am I missing something?

    Why would anyone go to the bother of "pretending" they were home brewing?

    Seems to be a simple to use and not prohibitively expensive system that has been getting pretty favorable write ups in the UK press.

    Sure there are less costly units that deliver pints at lower prices out there but at the end of the day, you pays your money and you takes your chance




  • hkjohn wrote: »
    Why would anyone go to the bother of "pretending" they were home brewing?

    Seems to be a simple to use and not prohibitively expensive system that has been getting pretty favorable write ups in the UK press.

    The main unit seems fine in terms of price, its a bit shinier than a pressure barrel, and robust enough to ferment under pressure.
    Sure there are less costly units that deliver pints at lower prices out there but at the end of the day, you pays your money and you takes your chance

    There is a difference between more and less costly kit ingredients, and your kit ingredients being more expensive than commercially sold beers (for which vat/excise etc. is paid), people cry foul.

    Normal kit beers will work out around 50c .. 70c per pint, and these extract kits are up around 1.50 per pint. It smells of razorblade economics/captive market ****e.


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  • sharingan wrote: »
    The main unit seems fine in terms of price, its a bit shinier than a pressure barrel, and robust enough to ferment under pressure.



    There is a difference between more and less costly kit ingredients, and your kit ingredients being more expensive than commercially sold beers (for which vat/excise etc. is paid), people cry foul.

    Normal kit beers will work out around 50c .. 70c per pint, and these extract kits are up around 1.50 per pint. It smells of razorblade economics/captive market ****e.


    If you know of a pub where you can buy pints for E1.50, please PM me with the address...




  • hkjohn wrote: »
    If you know of a pub where you can buy pints for E1.50, please PM me with the address...

    Straw man argument.

    If you are doing anything DIY related, and the task is within your ability, you should expected to pay a lot less for it in general. There are plenty of exceptions to this, but home brewing isnt one of them - as there are a lot of costs and taxes that apply to the professional product.

    You should be able to save serious money on the equivalent product in this hobby. If all you are doing is hydrating malt extract and adding yeast to it, its insane that the end result would be more expensive than a professionally canned/bottled product for which a lot of tax has been paid.

    The fact that the pinter has a hand pump doesnt make the extract pack more expensive. It has some conveniences for the home brewer, but not so much as to make the extract worth spending 2x to 3x for. The fact that draught beer is 4/5/6e + doesnt make the pinter system more valuable at 'only' 1.50e a pint.

    The point still stands, that the extract cost should not amount to more than you would pay for finished commercial product.

    Clearly the keg here is being sold at a heavy loss, in order to build up a captive market for expensive extract kits.

    For reference there are homebrewers out there, fermenting kit beer in pressure barrels and serving it off the barrel in the same way.

    You are paying a hefty premium for a small convenience over other ways to achieve the same thing.




  • Ah the "straw man argument" justification! The default position of all those who make absurd claims they are unable to justify when questioned.

    You then attempt to lecture me about DIY; a topic in which I have zero facility and even less interest in listening to the likes of you drone on.

    At the end of the day, this thread was about the Pinter.

    If I am happy to pay a premium for whatever convenience it offers then surely that is my business and has absolutely nothing to do with you.




  • Can we tone down the rhetoric, please?




  • Fine by me. All I am interested in is The Pinter I asked about in the OP




  • I get 10L beer from 2-2.5 kg grain and 30-100g hops. So 15-30cent a pint.
    I can get nice ipa s and wheat beers in supermarket for 1-2 euro.
    So tis a bit on the expensive side.




  • I still fail to see what it offers.
    As said before, homebrew should be cheap, 10-30c a pint.
    If you want beer on draft at home without a lot of hassle then buy some mini kegs, there’s plenty on the market.
    €1.50 a pint? There’s lots of good beers available in shops at that price.




  • Anything else like this on the market? Do the mini kegs not work out around 2 euro a pint?




  • Can these still be got via an post version of parcel motel etc?

    Or has brexit flecked it.

    Good few lads I know using them now in the UK and are well happy with them. Sure a big novelty but works well.

    Just wondering if anyone here is actively using them.




  • I bought one and got it delivered via AnPost.

    Very, very happy with it I am, too. Minimal hassle and excellent
    results - even my missus likes the IPA.

    Only complaint is those 10 pints are gone in a couple of nights

    While am sure you can get cheaper home brewing kits, I am a
    complete numpty and couldn't be dealing with the mess. The
    Pinter is very clean and needs only minimum attention.

    Would strongly recommend it if you want decent booze without
    having to turn your house into a chemical weapons lab


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  • Bogwoppit wrote: »
    I still fail to see what it offers.
    As said before, homebrew should be cheap, 10-30c a pint.
    If you want beer on draft at home without a lot of hassle then buy some mini kegs, there’s plenty on the market.
    €1.50 a pint? There’s lots of good beers available in shops at that price.

    10c a pint? No chance




  • hkjohn wrote: »
    I bought one and got it delivered via AnPost.

    Very, very happy with it I am, too. Minimal hassle and excellent
    results - even my missus likes the IPA.

    Only complaint is those 10 pints are gone in a couple of nights

    While am sure you can get cheaper home brewing kits, I am a
    complete numpty and couldn't be dealing with the mess. The
    Pinter is very clean and needs only minimum attention.

    Would strongly recommend it if you want decent booze without
    having to turn your house into a chemical weapons lab

    Got the pinter last month viaan post / address pal.
    Disappointed with it to be honest. Tried both lagers.
    Very cloudy despite conditioning for 10 days. Lots of sediment and a noticeable lemon aftertaste.
    Can anybody suggest what I am doing wrong.




  • boetstark wrote: »
    Tried both lagers.
    Very cloudy despite conditioning for 10 days. Lots of sediment and a noticeable lemon aftertaste.
    Can anybody suggest what I am doing wrong.
    You need to adjust your expectations if you're hoping for something that resembles commercial pale lagers. That's impossible to brew at home without some serious specialty equipment and a lot more time than ten days. You're stuck making ales with this, and when they write "lager" on the packaging they're lying to you.




  • Tbf you have to leave homebrewed beer mature for a lot longer than two weeks. I would say three months is the absolute minimum.




  • What is the alcohol content of this product? Seems very quick to make!




  • 10c a pint? No chance

    Absolutely yes you can.




  • Tbf you have to leave homebrewed beer mature for a lot longer than two weeks. I would say three months is the absolute minimum.

    I regularly have beer ready in 2 weeks using corny kegs. Not that difficult really.




  • boetstark wrote: »
    Got the pinter last month viaan post / address pal.
    Disappointed with it to be honest. Tried both lagers.
    Very cloudy despite conditioning for 10 days. Lots of sediment and a noticeable lemon aftertaste.
    Can anybody suggest what I am doing wrong.

    They have a Facebook page with lots of tips apparently.

    Did you get any Vat charges when addresspal delivered?




  • They have a Facebook page with lots of tips apparently.

    Did you get any Vat charges when addresspal delivered?

    Yeah had a 15 euro charge from customs


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  • boetstark wrote: »
    Yeah had a 15 euro charge from customs

    That's not too bad. Can live with that.
    Think I'll get one ordered so.

    Might be a bit of a gimmick but something to do.


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