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Proper Pronunciation or lah-dee-dah

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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,888 ✭✭✭cdgalwegian


    The Y in that Ye is a version of Th, so that Ye is the word The. Ye with the proper Y is related to You.
    Sound.
    Just duckduckgo'd plural alternatives for "you":

    https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/12916/yall-youse-8-english-ways-make-you-plural.

    7. Ye
    When English had a plural form back in the Renaissance, this was it. It is still used in Ireland.
    :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 745 ✭✭✭ClosedAccountFuzzy


    The correct form is Yizzers.


  • Posts: 3,801 ✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    Ye is from Ye Olde English is it not? I use it all the time in emails and texts. Nothing wrong with it- in fact it's an efficient way of communicating the plural You without it being a colloqiualism. That, or y'all, which ain't never gonna happen, no sirreeeeh!

    Yes. It’s part of old English that remained in Ireland.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 76,060 Mod ✭✭✭✭New Home


    Yous isn't too bad. I mean, the French use vous, and a v is just a y without a tail.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    New Home wrote: »
    Yous isn't too bad. I mean, the French use vous, and a v is just a y without a tail.

    The plural of you is you.

    I'm always amused by some who claim not to be able of willing to pronounce their th sound "because we're Irish" and dats d'way we speak!

    They then prove this by saying boat (instead of both), true (instead of through), taught (instead of thought), but then they might say heigth instead of height, which means they can pronounce the th sound, but in the wrong word :(

    Surely by creating a perfectly formed th sound where it doesn't belong, means that at least they can pronounce it, even if it's in the wrong place.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 24,137 ✭✭✭✭lawred2


    Yeah heigth is very annoying alright


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,888 ✭✭✭cdgalwegian


    The plural of you is you.

    I'm always amused by some who claim not to be able of willing to pronounce their th sound "because we're Irish" and dats d'way we speak!

    They then prove this by saying boat (instead of both), true (instead of through), taught (instead of thought), but then they might say heigth instead of height, which means they can pronounce the th sound, but in the wrong word :(

    Surely by creating a perfectly formed th sound where it doesn't belong, means that at least you can pronounce it, even if it's in the wrong place.


    Yeah, that's understood- it just leads to confusion when the English language no longer has a formal plural for You to distinguish it from the singular. Ye seems most acceptable as proper, though instead, contrariwise, comes across as perhaps a little low-brow, rather than high-brow/ lah-dee-dah.

    Havin said dat. I'm too tick ta tink dat it's turty-tree and a turd, and dat's da troot.


  • Posts: 3,801 ✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    The plural of you is you.

    Which is dumb , so regional dialects make up for it.
    I'm always amused by some who claim not to be able of willing to pronounce their th sound "because we're Irish" and dats d'way we speak!

    They then prove this by saying boat (instead of both), true (instead of through), taught (instead of thought), but then they might say heigth instead of height, which means they can pronounce the th sound, but in the wrong word :(

    Surely by creating a perfectly formed th sound where it doesn't belong, means that at least they can pronounce it, even if it's in the wrong place.

    Fun at parties are we? That’s a good party piece. I for one would listen with full attention.


  • Posts: 3,801 ✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    Sound.
    Just duckduckgo'd plural alternatives for "you":

    https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/12916/yall-youse-8-english-ways-make-you-plural.

    7. Ye
    When English had a plural form back in the Renaissance, this was it. It is still used in Ireland.
    :)

    You are both right. Ye was the plural of you and a way of spelling what is now The. As far as I know ye was pronounced like The.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,780 ✭✭✭KungPao


    lawred2 wrote: »
    Yeah heigth is very annoying alright
    Nearly as bad as throath!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 66 ✭✭CaboRoig


    Bonjour Trieste.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,785 ✭✭✭✭Brendan Bendar


    Yeah, that's understood- it just leads to confusion when the English language no longer has a formal plural for You to distinguish it from the singular. Ye seems most acceptable as proper, though instead, contrariwise, comes across as perhaps a little low-brow, rather than high-brow/ lah-dee-dah.

    Havin said dat. I'm too tick ta tink dat it's turty-tree and a turd, and dat's da troot.

    You should do the Lottho and be an authomathick winner.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,378 ✭✭✭Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    The plural of you is you.

    I'm always amused by some who claim not to be able of willing to pronounce their th sound "because we're Irish" and dats d'way we speak!

    They then prove this by saying boat (instead of both), true (instead of through), taught (instead of thought), but then they might say heigth instead of height, which means they can pronounce the th sound, but in the wrong word :(

    Surely by creating a perfectly formed th sound where it doesn't belong, means that at least they can pronounce it, even if it's in the wrong place.

    Sounds like you're embarrassed by Irish accents. What a strange complex to have.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    Sounds like you're embarrassed by Irish accents. What a strange complex to have.

    :confused:

    I have an Irish accent, but it doesn't prevent me from being able to say throat instead if troath.

    We're talking about pronunciation here, not talking accents. Maybe you didn't read the title or post #1.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,295 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato
    Golgafrinchan 'B' Ark


    "Now I want lots of energy out there today lads, you's have to try as hard as you can"

    Inconsistent. Shouldn't it be "youse have to try as hard as youse can"

    or how about

    "as hard as yizzer can" ;)

    Here's what you could have won.



  • Registered Users Posts: 33,295 ✭✭✭✭Hotblack Desiato
    Golgafrinchan 'B' Ark


    French announcements will call Aer Lingus - “Air Lang-Goose” and Dublin “doo blan” (which to be fair is closer to the native northside pronunciation anyway.)

    Well we don't say "Er Fronz" and "Paree" over here, do we?

    I can hear an R sound in the French pronunciation.



    They can pronounce it, they just can't spell it! :pac: (check out the last bit)

    Here's what you could have won.



  • Posts: 3,801 ✭✭✭[Deleted User]


    :confused:

    I have an Irish accent, but it doesn't prevent me from being able to say throat instead if troath.

    We're talking about pronunciation here, not talking accents. Maybe you didn't read the title or post #1.

    The two are strongly linked. An accent is a form of pronunciation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    fvp4 wrote: »
    The two are strongly linked. An accent is a form of pronunciation.

    Many Irish people say pacific meaning specific, should I take it that it's all down to accent, or might it be pronunciation issue?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,378 ✭✭✭Duffy the Vampire Slayer


    :confused:

    I have an Irish accent, but it doesn't prevent me from being able to say throat instead if troath.

    We're talking about pronunciation here, not talking accents. Maybe you didn't read the title or post #1.

    Those two things are very closely linked.


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,144 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    Many Irish people say pacific meaning specific, should I take it that it's all down to accent, or might it be pronunciation issue?

    It is much complained of, but I have never heard it myself. Not an Irish thing anyway. I will add another one to the explanation in this link. Bird is a version of the original word Brid.

    https://stranger-collective.com/pavement-pedantry-specific-not-pacific/


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    Is there any point to this thread if it's all down to accents :o

    Tree, a woody plant with a trunk, or a number?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,356 ✭✭✭Badly Drunk Boy


    The plural of you is you.

    I'm always amused by some who claim not to be able of willing to pronounce their th sound "because we're Irish" and dats d'way we speak!

    They then prove this by saying boat (instead of both), true (instead of through), taught (instead of thought), but then they might say heigth instead of height, which means they can pronounce the th sound, but in the wrong word :(
    Are you equally appalled when English people don't pronounce the 'wh' sound? Whales = Wales? I know that it may be a quite acceptable way to pronounce it now, but it wasn't always the case.

    And I don't know what you mean with your 'heigth' instead of 'height' thing. I've never witnessed that.
    Surely by creating a perfectly formed th sound where it doesn't belong, means that at least they can pronounce it, even if it's in the wrong place.
    Like the way in some areas, the English don't pronounce Rs but stick them in words where there never was an R?

    Because there is no 'th' sound in Irish didn't help. Even if the majority don't speak Irish anymore, there are a lot of elements from the language that have been handed down.

    When Rachael Blackmore won the Grand National this year, while still on the horse she said something like "I can't believe I'm after winning!". She was misquoted in parts of the English media because they didn't understand her phraseology. I know that's not to do with pronunciation but it shows the influence that Irish had on the way we speak here.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,338 ✭✭✭seagull


    The Y in that Ye is a version of Th, so that Ye is the word The. Ye with the proper Y is related to You.

    As you say, it's not actually a Y in that usage. It's a strange archaic letter called a thorn, which is the equivalent of th


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    Are you equally appalled when English people don't pronounce the 'wh' sound? Whales = Wales? I know that it may be a quite acceptable way to pronounce it now, but it wasn't always the case.

    And I don't know what you mean with your 'heigth' instead of 'height' thing. I've never witnessed that.

    Like the way in some areas, the English don't pronounce Rs but stick them in words where there never was an R?

    Because there is no 'th' sound in Irish didn't help. Even if the majority don't speak Irish anymore, there are a lot of elements from the language that have been handed down.

    I agree with most of what you say and I'm only mentioning mispronunciations locally as this is where I live, but yes indeed some of the mispronunciations by English people are appaling & bewildering, 'sixth' for example does not sound as it should (sict?) plus the R thing as you mentioned is very prevalent in parts of England.

    The point I was making was that sometimes people who claim not to be able to pronounce the 'th' sound (for example) actually can, but they sometimes put in in the wrong words like heigth, which I would say counts mispronunciation, although I'm now told that it's accent!


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,144 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    If I said I had Twentysix Sheep or I had Twenty Sick Sheep, you would need keen ears to pick up the difference. I wouldn't be concerned about the way people pronounce Sixth. The two standard forms are well recognised in dictionaries.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,184 ✭✭✭riclad


    I don't expect Spanish or French people to be able to pronounce all English words perfectly as most of themmay not have studied english as a language in school
    I think the irish have a higher standard to reach because we have grown up watching TV from the UK and American TV eg most programs are in English so we should be able to pronounce English words properly
    It may go back to school we are given books to read
    Essays to write , there's no exams regarding talking or pronunciation in English
    Having an accent does not mean you don't know how to
    pronounce a word
    I presume French people watch most tv with French language soundtracks


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,908 ✭✭✭Conall Cernach


    Gateaux
    Fella goes into a bakery and says "Can I have one of those Black Forest Gatuxes".
    The baker says "Certainly sir, but it's pronounced gat-o. Would you anything written on it?"
    Yer man replies "Don't bother your bollo."


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,144 ✭✭✭✭dxhound2005


    riclad wrote: »
    I don't expect Spanish or French people to be able to pronounce all English words perfectly as most of themmay not have studied english as a language in school
    I think the irish have a higher standard to reach because we have grown up watching TV from the UK and American TV eg most programs are in English so we should be able to pronounce English words properly
    It may go back to school we are given books to read
    Essays to write , there's no exams regarding talking or pronunciation in English
    Having an accent does not mean you don't know how to
    pronounce a word
    I presume French people watch most tv with French language soundtracks

    Do you ever use Wanna, Gonna? Might you say Budder instead of Butter in normal speech? Could you ever have lapsed into I'm thinkin' a goin' instead of I'm thinking of going? If not you have achieved a level of perfection missing from those Oxbridge types who inhabit the BBC.


  • Registered Users Posts: 914 ✭✭✭Jakey Rolling


    lawred2 wrote: »
    Yeah heigth is very annoying alright


    Ireland is the only English speaking country where I have heard "heigth" used, and it grates on my ears every time.

    Its a bit of an oddity alright - it would make sense for it to have the same ending as length, width, depth but for whatever reason the standard usage has been "height" for a couple of centuries. It is listed in some dictionaries as "dialectal variant".

    Similar misplaced "th" that jump out at me are
    "thread" and "threadmill" instead of "tread" (even heard in the RSA ad warning against bald tyres)
    Thighland (the country normally known as Tie-land)
    "Th"omas instead of Tom-ass (in this case, the Irish version would be closer to standard English)
    and worst of all, "thought" instead of "taught" is inexcusable!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,116 ✭✭✭Hamsterchops


    Ireland is the only English speaking country where I have heard "heigth" used, and it grates on my ears every time.

    Its a bit of an oddity alright - it would make sense for it to have the same ending as length, width, depth but for whatever reason the standard usage has been "height" for a couple of centuries. It is listed in some dictionaries as "dialectal variant".

    Similar misplaced "th" that jump out at me are
    "thread" and "threadmill" instead of "tread" (even heard in the RSA ad warning against bald tyres)
    Thighland (the country normally known as Tie-land)
    "Th"omas instead of Tom-ass (in this case, the Irish version would be closer to standard English)
    and worst of all, "thought" instead of "taught" is inexcusable!

    You say all that, but as I've been told earlier in the thread it's all down to ones accent.

    Talking of tread & thread, there was a safety awareness campaign running on the radio last year warning drivers to check the thread depth on their tyres, I kid you not.


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