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Galway's traffic issues

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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,992 ✭✭✭✭flazio


    Flazio ....as a taxpayer who contributes to the salaries of these people what I would expect is... FOR THEM TO BE CAPABLE TO DO THEIR JOB .
    I'm self employed .
    I'm good at my job .
    As a country we take poor service in every aspect of Irish life .
    This traffic fiasco has been going on for the past few years .
    What has been done ???? NOTHING
    Do you actually beleive that one person elected in local elections is going to make a DIFFERANCE to galway traffic ???

    If they are as passionate as you are on the issue, then yes I do.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 658 ✭✭✭jjpep


    Me and three other people where I work use electric bikes. All roughly the same length of a commute, about 40 Kms return. Find it's great, particularly on days where when the weather wouldn't be so encouraging to ride a normal bike.

    No of us were really affected by the extra car traffic on Monday, despite having to travel across the city.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,943 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    jjpep wrote: »
    Me and three other people where I work use electric bikes. All roughly the same length of a commute, about 40 Kms return. Find it's great, particularly on days where when the weather wouldn't be so encouraging to ride a normal bike.

    No of us were really affected by the extra car traffic on Monday, despite having to travel across the city.

    Hear the same from a colleague at work who has one - makes it easy in the wind + can wear heavier rain gear on the odd occasion it does rain on the commute


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭xckjoo


    Hear the same from a colleague at work who has one - makes it easy in the wind + can wear heavier rain gear on the odd occasion it does rain on the commute


    You don't arrive in a pool of sweat either so don't need a shower. A change of clothes is a good idea though :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,438 ✭✭✭McGiver


    jjpep wrote:
    Me and three other people where I work use electric bikes. All roughly the same length of a commute, about 40 Kms return. Find it's great, particularly on days where when the weather wouldn't be so encouraging to ride a normal bike.

    What's the cost just out of interest?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 658 ✭✭✭jjpep


    McGiver wrote: »
    What's the cost just out of interest?

    All were in the region of 1800 - 2200 euro. I got mine on BTW so the first 1000 is roughly half in reality.

    Running costs are about the same as a regular bike. Battery recharge (from about half full) is a couple of cents


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    jjpep wrote: »
    All were in the region of 1800 - 2200 euro. I got mine on BTW so the first 1000 is roughly half in reality.

    Running costs are about the same as a regular bike. Battery recharge (from about half full) is a couple of cents

    I'm guessing you have pretty secure locations to store it.

    The cost and the risk of theft are the biggest things to put me off getting one but man I'm tempted.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 658 ✭✭✭jjpep


    I'm guessing you have pretty secure locations to store it.

    The cost and the risk of theft are the biggest things to put me off getting one but man I'm tempted.

    Yep, locked shed at home and work. And a decent lock. Tend to not use it to go into town, just take my regular bike instead.

    Made huge sense for me, given the distance of the commute. It was always doable on the regular bike but a couple of days of bad weather would knock it out of me and ended up driving more times than I wanted, particularly on windy days. I wouldn't call it a replacement for a regular bike though, more like a replacement for a 2nd car. Its just that little bit bigger, and as you touched on there, the cost makes it more of a thing that you're not going to want to leave in an unsecured place for very long.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,943 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    jjpep wrote: »
    Yep, locked shed at home and work. And a decent lock. Tend to not use it to go into town, just take my regular bike instead.

    Made huge sense for me, given the distance of the commute. It was always doable on the regular bike but a couple of days of bad weather would knock it out of me and ended up driving more times than I wanted, particularly on windy days. I wouldn't call it a replacement for a regular bike though, more like a replacement for a 2nd car. Its just that little bit bigger, and as you touched on there, the cost makes it more of a thing that you're not going to want to leave in an unsecured place for very long.

    Very cheap then if its a replacement for a 2nd car.
    Workplace cycle parking can have a big impact when going electric. Presume battery is removable? Alot of people where I work leave an extra lock at the workplace rack - less weight to carry/additional security.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭xckjoo


    I'm guessing you have pretty secure locations to store it.

    The cost and the risk of theft are the biggest things to put me off getting one but man I'm tempted.


    I built one for about €600-700 (not including the cost of the bike frame as I had an old bike lying around). I just went the kit from EU business route so it might be possible to do it cheaper again if you're willing to buy in parts from China. It's completely street legal as far as I can tell.

    I'm a little bit paranoid out theft as well but have secure lock space at work. I also take the battery with me when I lock it. The battery actually costs more than the motor so there's less loss if the bike is stolen. Plus the thing weighs a ton if you try and cycle it without the battery so anyone that robs it is likely to regret it :pac:


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,208 ✭✭✭bobbyss


    jjpep wrote:
    Yep, locked shed at home and work. And a decent lock. Tend to not use it to go into town, just take my regular bike instead.


    Are many of these stolen do you know? Have you ever had your regular bike stolen? Does it matter really what kind of lock you put on any bike, as if they want it they'll take it?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 658 ✭✭✭jjpep


    bobbyss wrote: »
    Are many of these stolen do you know? Have you ever had your regular bike stolen? Does it matter really what kind of lock you put on any bike, as if they want it they'll take it?

    In order:

    No idea.
    Yes.
    I've of the belief that most bike thieft is opportunistic so a decent lock is probably good enough.
    If someone is determined to steal your bike (or anything else), sadly, not only will they probably be able to so but will in all likelihood get away with it. Our bikes are covered by our house insurance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 150 ✭✭Worn Out


    Just an observation but I left Parkmore yesterday and cycled past 28 cars queued up to leave the estate. Only 1 car had 2 people in it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 658 ✭✭✭jjpep


    Worn Out wrote: »
    Just an observation but I left Parkmore yesterday and cycled past 28 cars queued up to leave the estate. Only 1 car had 2 people in it.

    Yeah, the more accurate but less snappy name for the thread should be 'Galways car traffic and lack of proper infrastructure for buses, cyclist's and pedistrans issues'

    It's funny how it's always pitched as one group Vs the other when the reality is any properly implemented improvements benefits all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,943 ✭✭✭what_traffic


    jjpep wrote: »
    Yeah, the more accurate but less snappy name for the thread should be 'Galways car traffic and lack of proper infrastructure for buses, cyclist's and pedistrans issues'

    It's funny how it's always pitched as one group Vs the other when the reality is any properly implemented improvements benefits all.

    Ya get the same with the Irish media coverage - the media producers always want a Punch and Judy type of interaction when covering. Hence the low level of knowledge in the body politic and public in general on the topic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,312 ✭✭✭✭zell12


    Councillors were briefed on GTS and the city centre traffic management plan.
    The meeting heard there is a plan to make changes to College Road with some restrictions to facilitate a through route for public transport.
    Officials advised motorists will still be able to access it from both sides but there will be a point on the route traffic will not be able to drive through.
    https://galwaybayfm.ie/galway-bay-fm-news-desk/concern-pedestrian-crossing-at-spanish-arch-causing-daily-backlog-at-lough-atalia-road/
    .
    Meanwhile, pedestrians are second class citizens
    the pedestrian crossing at Spanish Arch is causing the backlog that regularly stretches as far back as Lough Atalia says Cllr Keane.
    Officials advised that currently pedestrians cross in an uncontrolled manner and said that a plan to remove the central island and provide a more targeted crossing aims to remedy this


  • Registered Users Posts: 672 ✭✭✭Ashleigh1986


    Pedestrians second class citizens ???
    Your having a joke .
    The city I drive in (galway) pedestrians cross wherever they want .
    Most don't even wait for the red man to turn green to cross .
    Go from the courthouse to up past prospect hill and see how many pedestrians cross out in front of you if your driving a car or on a bike .


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,144 ✭✭✭✭JCX BXC


    You'd be driven insane as a pedestrian if you'd to wait at the cathedral or other locations every time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 672 ✭✭✭Ashleigh1986


    How about walking on footpaths and cross at pedestrian crossings ???
    Take for example the pedestrian lights at " cafe express "
    Just stand back for 5 minutes and you will see how many pedestrians just walk out no matter what colour the lights are .
    Same with the lights at the following
    Richardsons / garveys/ myrick hotel / outside big o taxi office .
    In civilised countries people wait for the red man to turn green but no in Ireland they will chance it !!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,586 ✭✭✭Laviski


    How about walking on footpaths and cross at pedestrian crossings ???
    Take for example the pedestrian lights at " cafe express "
    Just stand back for 5 minutes and you will see how many pedestrians just walk out no matter what colour the lights are .
    Same with the lights at the following
    Richardsons / garveys/ myrick hotel / outside big o taxi office .
    In civilised countries people wait for the red man to turn green but no in Ireland they will chance it !!!

    ofc they will
    its part of the compo culture.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 25,844 ✭✭✭✭Mrs OBumble


    JCX BXC wrote: »
    You'd be driven insane as a pedestrian if you'd to wait at the cathedral or other locations every time.

    Nonsense.

    And I say that as an every-day pedestrian and bus-user.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭Whereisgalway


    JCX BXC wrote: »
    You'd be driven insane as a pedestrian if you'd to wait at the cathedral or other locations every time.

    Nonsense.

    And I say that as an every-day pedestrian and bus-user.

    So your saying most pedestrians wait patiently for the lights to turn red and green man to flash before crossing?


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    So your saying most pedestrians wait patiently for the lights to turn red and green man to flash before crossing?

    There's likely a correlation between the ratios of drivers speeding in the city, cyclists breaking red lights and pedestrians crossing without due care. Think its called the knobhead ratio.

    In other words, there are no angels out there so trying to demonise one set of society over another is utterly ridiculous and achieves nothing other than allowing for excuses for inaction


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,489 ✭✭✭✭Fitz*


    There are some lights out of sync I reckon and that is part of the reason for why people walk during a red pedestrian light.

    There are some crosses that will show red traffic lights and red pedestrian lights at the same time (albeit outside the city centre).


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,144 ✭✭✭✭JCX BXC


    For example, to walk from the left hand of the quincentenary bridge to the same side of the Sean mulvoy road, you've to cross 4 pedestrian crossings, all of which go green at different times, so you're waiting at every light.

    Can easily add a few minutes to your walking journey.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    JCX BXC wrote: »
    For example, to walk from the left hand of the quincentenary bridge to the same side of the Sean mulvoy road, you've to cross 4 pedestrian crossings, all of which go green at different times, so you're waiting at every light.

    Can easily add a few minutes to your walking journey.

    Sometimes safety can be an inconvenience but I take the point. There can definitely be improvements made to allow additional pedestrian greens with no decrease in the throughput of the junctions


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭xckjoo


    Sometimes safety can be an inconvenience but I take the point. There can definitely be improvements made to allow additional pedestrian greens with no decrease in the throughput of the junctions


    Devils advocate here but within the city limits, people should 100% not have to worry about getting hit by a car while walking.


  • Registered Users Posts: 746 ✭✭✭topcat77


    There should be a lot more light controlled crossings in the city centre and all should be pedestrian biased.

    The lights at Spanish arch are a joke along with Eyre square. no crossings along Eglington street and trying to get from Galway shopping centre to Galway retail park is a nightmare for anyone.


  • Posts: 24,715 [Deleted User]


    xckjoo wrote: »
    Devils advocate here but within the city limits, people should 100% not have to worry about getting hit by a car while walking.

    You can’t be serious? Pedestrians are 100% responsible for looking after themselves when walking and should very much worry about putting themselves in harms way as it’s their job to stay out of cars way if they set foot on the road, which is for cars not walkers aside from when they have a green man to cross. Are you suggesting that walkers should just be able to walk out in front of cars and expect them to stop and if they don’t it’s not their own stupid fault?

    Look I never wait for a green man and cross where it’s most convienent but I do so at my own risk and make sure not to impede cars when doing so.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 746 ✭✭✭topcat77


    You can’t be serious? Pedestrians are 100% responsible for looking after themselves when walking and should very much worry about putting themselves in harms way as it’s their job to stay out of cars way if they set foot on the road, which is for cars not walkers aside from when they have a green man to cross.

    Look I never wait for a green man and cross where it’s most convienent but I do so at my own risk and make sure not to impede cars when doing so.



    What about the old and infirm? Keep them locked in the house i suppose?


This discussion has been closed.
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