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Norwegian Air Discussion

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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 4,166 Mod ✭✭✭✭Locker10a


    Yay, looking forward to expensive fares, and less service.......just from Cork


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 17,642 Mod ✭✭✭✭Graham


    Locker10a wrote: »
    Yay, looking forward to expensive fares, and less service.......just from Cork

    I understand it's not going to be mandatory to fly with them so you should be ok. ;)

    Personally I think it's pretty good news for the airline, the airport and the region.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,771 ✭✭✭Bsal


    Wasn't this held up with disputes over crews working conditions etc has any of that been resolved?


  • Registered Users Posts: 968 ✭✭✭medoc


    Have they any plans to fly out of Dublin to US destinations? I presume this permission will enable them to fly transatlantic from other EU cities direct too.


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 11,994 Mod ✭✭✭✭Cookiemunster


    Not just Cork. They're in negotiations with SNN as well.

    https://twitter.com/ShannonAirport/status/804968778681479168


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  • Registered Users Posts: 911 ✭✭✭Mebuntu


    Yay, looking forward to expensive fares, and less service.......just from Cork
    Couldn't understand this comment. What would be the point in starting up if the fares are going to be expensive? If people want expensive they can go with EI et al.

    Then I read this article in the Irish Times and all was explained as it's clear that some of the usual suspects are opposed to it, the same as they were to a certain other Irish airline startup a long time ago now.

    https://www.irishtimes.com/business/transport-and-tourism/low-cost-airline-granted-licence-for-ireland-us-flights-1.2891515

    Shame that the certain other Irish airline didn't get in first but I wish Norwegian the best just as I did Tony Ryan all those years ago.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 666 ✭✭✭maximum12


    Glad to hear. Great day for Boston and the New England area!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,532 ✭✭✭Zonda999


    As a Cork man, I'm happy to see this go ahead but it really is hope rather than certainty I have that this will be a success.

    I just think that if you look at the existing capacity we have on Ireland to Boston (Including Delta entering DUB-BOS in 2017) as well as the new EI Hartford route, it feels like we are reaching a new high in terms of transatlatic connectivity and I just hope there is the market there to sustain it.

    More so, in the case of Cork, we already have WOW starting 5x weekly next year aiming for the same market. I really think more than half the demand for these new routes will have to be North American based pax because lets face it Cork based passengers are going to be price sensitive and I would have thought, more than willing to fly via LHR or AMS to get a decent all inclusive fare


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭Deagol


    Not just Cork. They're in negotiations with SNN as well.

    https://twitter.com/ShannonAirport/status/804968778681479168

    Hope to hell that doesn't happen. EI will likely pull out and leave us with no business class for those that need to work immediately upon arriving etc. :mad:

    I'd rather drive to Dublin or fly to JFK with flag carriers


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,018 ✭✭✭✭murphaph


    Zonda999 wrote: »
    As a Cork man, I'm happy to see this go ahead but it really is hope rather than certainty I have that this will be a success.

    I just think that if you look at the existing capacity we have on Ireland to Boston (Including Delta entering DUB-BOS in 2017) as well as the new EI Hartford route, it feels like we are reaching a new high in terms of transatlatic connectivity and I just hope there is the market there to sustain it.

    More so, in the case of Cork, we already have WOW starting 5x weekly next year aiming for the same market. I really think more than half the demand for these new routes will have to be North American based pax because lets face it Cork based passengers are going to be price sensitive and I would have thought, more than willing to fly via LHR or AMS to get a decent all inclusive fare
    Corkonians need to use it or lose it.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,539 ✭✭✭kub


    Going back to technicalities here, I know Ryanair deliveries fly direct from Settle to Dublin non stop, it being an empty plane.
    Will a 737-800 have the range and especially in the winter months with the Easterly winds when heading West to get all the way to Boston or NYC without stopping to top up?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,771 ✭✭✭Bsal


    kub wrote: »
    Going back to technicalities here, I know Ryanair deliveries fly direct from Settle to Dublin non stop, it being an empty plane.
    Will a 737-800 have the range and especially in the winter months with the Easterly winds when heading West to get all the way to Boston or NYC without stopping to top up?

    I presume they will have to limit the number of passengers to well below the standard 189 of the B738 due to the runway lenght at Cork being 2133m.


  • Registered Users Posts: 919 ✭✭✭Bussywussy


    I dont think Norweigen plan to have their TA 737 MAX in 189 config anyway. Dual class 164 which are being delivered next may,doubt runway is an issue anyway for 737s even full.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭bkehoe


    Bsal wrote: »
    I presume they will have to limit the number of passengers to well below the standard 189 of the B738 due to the runway lenght at Cork being 2133m.

    Yes, a ballpark of approx 100 pax max if getting airborne with full fuel tanks out of Cork on an average winters day (i.e. lower than standard QNH). I'd say this service will see regular west bound fuel stops, even if its at Shannon!


  • Registered Users Posts: 919 ✭✭✭Bussywussy


    bkehoe wrote: »
    Yes, a ballpark of approx 100 pax max if getting airborne with full fuel tanks out of Cork on an average winters day (i.e. lower than standard QNH). I'd say this service will see regular west bound fuel stops, even if its at Shannon!

    that little,jesus


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,189 ✭✭✭drdeadlift


    Lower cargo/pax and just enough petrol..


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,002 ✭✭✭dev100


    kub wrote:
    Going back to technicalities here, I know Ryanair deliveries fly direct from Settle to Dublin non stop, it being an empty plane. Will a 737-800 have the range and especially in the winter months with the Easterly winds when heading West to get all the way to Boston or NYC without stopping to top up?


    Years ago I seen a Ryan air plane sitting on the run way in Seattle . I asked the question how do they manage to get it home and I was told they can extra fuel bags or something to that affect maybe that could be wrong ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,920 ✭✭✭billy few mates


    I think it's just a way of getting their foot in the door while they overcome all the regulatory hurdles, start off with a ORK-BOS service (or any other fanciful route pairing that no one else already does) so they can get the whole operation up and running with little or no objections. Once this one starts they can announce an expansion with a whole series of new routes out of DUB and SNN (which is the real prize) and then after a while just quietly drop the ORK-BOS route citing lack of customer demand.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭bkehoe


    dev100 wrote: »
    Years ago I seen a Ryan air plane sitting on the run way in Seattle . I asked the question how do they manage to get it home and I was told they can extra fuel bags or something to that affect maybe that could be wrong ?

    There's no additional ferry fuel tanks fitted to the 737 for delivery flights. The aircraft is capable of a flight this length because it's empty and therefore weighs less. Therefore its capable of taking a full 21 tonne fuel load and cruises at higher altitudes (which its capable of initially due to no passenger weight) where the engines burn less fuel as they don't need to produce as much thrust to remain at cruise altitude than if the aircraft also had a load of passengers on board. Also the prevailing westerly winds help a lot - this flight wouldn't be anywhere close to possible if going west-bound. The reserve fuel requirements are lower too, as of course the aircraft is extremely light by the time it arrives at DUB and reserve fuel burn requirement varies with the aircraft weight.

    On rare occasions the winds aren't strong enough and an en-route fuel uplift is required. EG Jet2 couldn't do a direct delivery flight on one of their new arrivals recently. Poorer weather at destination could also increase reserve fuel requirements which would then make the direct flight impossible as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,348 ✭✭✭basill


    Cork was always a side show. This was about a non EU loco getting an EU AOC and gaining access to the US market. This will now be used as the springboard for flights across Europe to commence. Quite what Kenny and Co were up to in supporting it all along none of us can fathom. Sometimes you have to be careful for what you wish for.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,920 ✭✭✭billy few mates


    basill wrote: »
    Cork was always a side show. This was about a non EU loco getting an EU AOC and gaining access to the US market. This will now be used as the springboard for flights across Europe to commence. Quite what Kenny and Co were up to in supporting it all along none of us can fathom. Sometimes you have to be careful for what you wish for.

    How can a politician oppose it...?
    An operator promising to bring "much needed" transport links, employment, investment (insert what ever other relevant buzzword applies) to an airport or a region that's crying out for transport links, employment, investment etc and its impossible to oppose it without upsetting the local government representatives and the electorate in that area. The locals would take to the streets in their thousands even though the vast majority of them will probably never use this particular service.


  • Registered Users Posts: 911 ✭✭✭Mebuntu


    This will now be used as the springboard for flights across Europe to commence.
    What's wrong with that, then? The more choice for consumers the better.


  • Registered Users Posts: 906 ✭✭✭steve-o


    basill wrote: »
    This was about a non EU loco getting an EU AOC and gaining access to the US market.
    How do you arrive at that conclusion? Noway has been a party to Europe-US open skies since 2011. It already operates EU-US, so Norwegian don't need an EU AOC for that.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 4,166 Mod ✭✭✭✭Locker10a


    steve-o wrote: »
    basill wrote: »
    This was about a non EU loco getting an EU AOC and gaining access to the US market.
    How do you arrive at that conclusion? Noway has been a party to Europe-US open skies since 2011. It already operates EU-US, so Norwegian don't need an EU AOC for that.

    Yes they do, thats why they set up a pigeon hole company based in Ireland(See Norwegian International), for access to an Irish AOC which allows them more market access and with lesser regulation and employment law...


  • Registered Users Posts: 906 ✭✭✭steve-o


    Locker10a wrote: »
    Yes they do, thats why they set up a pigeon hole company based in Ireland(See Norwegian International), for access to an Irish AOC which allows them more market access and with lesser regulation and employment law...
    NAS (Norway) absolutely can operate Ireland to US under Open Skies. They don't need NAI (Ireland) for that. Your final point (lesser regulation and employment law) is the relevant one and that's the bone of contention for IALPA and their US counterparts.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,592 ✭✭✭elastico


    I think it's just a way of getting their foot in the door while they overcome all the regulatory hurdles, start off with a ORK-BOS service (or any other fanciful route pairing that no one else already does) so they can get the whole operation up and running with little or no objections. Once this one starts they can announce an expansion with a whole series of new routes out of DUB and SNN (which is the real prize) and then after a while just quietly drop the ORK-BOS route citing lack of customer demand.

    How is Shannon a prize? Aer Lingus seem to struggle to keep an operation going there, where will the passengers come from?


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,920 ✭✭✭billy few mates


    elastico wrote: »
    How is Shannon a prize? Aer Lingus seem to struggle to keep an operation going there, where will the passengers come from?

    I meant to say DUB as the main prize, SNN possibly a stepping stone to it...


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭billie1b


    Bussywussy wrote: »
    that little,jesus
    This flight is DUB - JFK on a B738 there is a ORK - BOS example further down

    Works out in or around 142 pax, thats with 12 business class seats, extra bars, a crew of 03+05, eaxh pax having a 23kg bag each and being able to take a full fuel load of 22,100kgs with a max take off weight of 77,990kgs and that still leaves a little room for extra bags etc..
    It wouldn't need the full 22,100kgs of fuel though, around 19,500kgs would be good with it burning 15,000-16,000kgs on the way (weather dependent).

    Here's an example loadsheet for you.

    ACD11AFF-5B7E-4ED1-8B17-F5C5110771B7_zpsyjxprrjj.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭bkehoe


    billie1b wrote: »
    max take off weight of 77,990kgs

    While the a/c can be certified with a MTOW up to 79 tonnes depending on the operator, the problem in Cork in winter is that the runway length won't allow much more than 70 tonnes for the RTOW with the conditions on some days (e.g. low QNH typically found during wet windy days).

    Edit: Even today when the QNH is higher than STD (good), temperature lower than ISA (good), headwind component (good), with engine bleed supply for the air-conditioning packs off (not a normal SOP for most 737 operators, only used for extra performance), the RTOW is in the region of 76 tonnes.

    If we assume no wind credit (runway in Cork doesn't point into the prevailing wind so on a windy day there would be very little credit for headwind) and a QNH of 980 (by no means as low as it can go; I've flown when its in the 960s!) and make the runway WET then we're limited to approx 70 tonnes (71 ish if Norwegian have 27k engines).


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,811 ✭✭✭billie1b


    bkehoe wrote: »
    While the a/c can be certified with a MTOW up to 79 tonnes depending on the operator, the problem in Cork in winter is that the runway length won't allow much more than 70 tonnes for the RTOW with the conditions on some days (e.g. low QNH typically found during wet windy days).

    Edit: Even today when the QNH is higher than STD (good), temperature lower than ISA (good), headwind component (good), with engine bleed supply for the air-conditioning packs off (not a normal SOP for most 737 operators, only used for extra performance), the RTOW is in the region of 76 tonnes.

    If we assume no wind credit (runway in Cork doesn't point into the prevailing wind so on a windy day there would be very little credit for headwind) and a QNH of 980 (by no means as low as it can go; I've flown when its in the 960s!) and make the runway WET then we're limited to approx 70 tonnes (71 ish if Norwegian have 27k engines).

    Sorry I should have been more transparent, that was a loadsheet for a Ryanair 800 out of DUB as asked by a poster eaelier.


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