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Garda Sergeant can't afford food

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,594 Giruilla


    The sense of entitlement in Ireland - exemplified strongly by that ridiculous Irish Times article - is truly shocking.


  • Registered Users Posts: 456 ✭✭ anndub


    Story doesn't add up. My Dad held the same position and raised six of us comfortably on his salary alone. All of us hold a third level qualification. My mother didn't work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,691 ✭✭✭ Tombo2001


    mariaalice wrote: »
    At the same time you have got to wonder why the wife is not working.

    .


    A very obvious answer to that question is the cost of working.

    Childcare costs €25k a year (or €50k in salary terms).

    Commuting....€1k to €3k a year, depending on where you have to go.

    Plus, the tax shield for a married couple with one worker is better for where there are two.


  • Registered Users Posts: 973 ✭✭✭ stevedublin


    Giruilla wrote: »
    The sense of entitlement in Ireland - exemplified strongly by that ridiculous Irish Times article - is truly shocking.

    Yes, how dare spoilt Irish kids feel entitled to food. :rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,900 ✭✭✭✭ road_high


    All this article does for me is reinforce my view that Gardai are grossly overpaid.


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  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 9,339 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Shenshen


    Mellio wrote: »
    Valid points on all bar one - childcare is non essential, what do you propose get rid of your kids. Mmmmmm :D

    Considering that there is no mention of her income, I suspect the wife is a stay-at-home mom.
    No need to pay for additional childcare, is there?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,845 barbiegirl


    Mellio wrote: »
    Valid points on all bar one - childcare is non essential, what do you propose get rid of your kids. Mmmmmm :D

    Ah no, sure you can put them in the backyard ;) Seriously I'm assuming that she is a housewife, therefore why pay for childcare?


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,032 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Bannasidhe


    Tombo2001 wrote: »
    A very obvious answer to that question is the cost of working.

    Childcare costs €25k a year (or €50k in salary terms).

    Commuting....€1k to €3k a year, depending on where you have to go.

    Plus, the tax shield for a married couple with one worker is better for where there are two.

    If one parent is not working outside the home why is childcare required?

    And yes, I am a parent.


  • Registered Users Posts: 465 ✭✭ Undercover Elephant


    anndub wrote: »
    Story doesn't add up. My Dad held the same position and raised six of us comfortably on his salary alone. All of us hold a third level qualification. My mother didn't work.

    He probably didn't have a €1400 monthly mortgage payment, though. My parents' mortgage was fixed at £25 / month.

    And maybe your parents, like most good parents, did their best to shield from their children how difficult it can sometimes be.


  • Registered Users Posts: 415 ✭✭ Degringola


    Don't know if this has been asked already, but does he have 'investment properties'. Gardai are notorious for their 'property portfolios.'

    It's the one question that's never asked by any interviewer ever. The elephant in the room.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,594 Giruilla


    Yes, how dare spoilt Irish kids feel entitled to food. :rolleyes:

    You honestly believe that woman can't afford to feed her kids?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,594 Giruilla


    Make no mistake, that article is nothing to do with them struggling to feed their kids or survive... its about them 'struggling to keep up a lifestyle!!'


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,486 ✭✭✭ Mountjoy Mugger


    A very entertaining thread.

    Please, carry on with the holier than thou "I can live on half that - raise 6 kids - pay a mortgage - send my kids to Uni - they should shut up - let them eat porridge" posts.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,869 ✭✭✭ asherbassad


    xabi wrote: »
    I bet they have 2 fairly new cars with high repayments along with all the other luxuries like full sky package, high speed broadband, iphones, gym membership, etc, etc. Most people seem to think these items are basic and couldn't live without them. I caught the tail end of this story on Ireland AM, they recon they have €109 / week left after all bills are paid!

    €109 / week ?????

    I could feed a family of 10 with that. And it wouldn't be slop either.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,869 ✭✭✭ asherbassad


    Plazaman wrote: »
    Yes, it's a well known fact that all Gardai do not pay tax :rolleyes:

    Although I do call bullshít on this :



    A Garda Sergeant would not be paid weekly, it's either fortnightly or monthly. You Madam, are a liar!

    And since when does your mortgage, bills, etc. get deducted from your salary?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,631 ✭✭✭ Celticfire


    €109 / week ?????

    I could feed a family of 10 with that. And it wouldn't be slop either.

    Go ahead..... post up the menu and costings...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,198 Pal


    They could go to the Christmas Markets with Ryanair and buy a years supply of cornflakes there. Only €23 one way incl taxes.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,897 ✭✭✭ MagicSean


    And since when does your mortgage, bills, etc. get deducted from your salary?

    I've already said there's a scheme with the credit union to have money for bills deducted straight from the salary and placed in the a budget account for bills to be be paid from.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,897 ✭✭✭ MagicSean


    Good point.





    Don't forget to add the €5,136 for Child benefit. Also €1,600 minus €250 is not €1,150.

    Thanks for the correction.
    It has to be factored in because it contributes to income.

    But i was only giving a breakdown of the salary figure.
    Bannasidhe wrote: »
    If someones expenditure exceeds their income they are not budgeting properly a fact you seem to be either unable to grasp or for some reason wish to ignore.

    Right, like yours was when you lost your job.


  • Registered Users Posts: 973 ✭✭✭ stevedublin


    Pal wrote: »
    They could go to the Christmas Markets with Ryanair and buy a years supply of cornflakes there. Only €23 one way incl taxes.

    Thats €46 return, and much more again when the baggage charges (for all those cornflakes!) are included


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,198 Pal


    They could get a job on a supermarket checkout at €10 an hour.

    Work 10 hour days. Every day.

    Within a short 3 years, they could buy a wedding cake.


  • Registered Users Posts: 668 ✭✭✭ blow69


    I find it very hard to buy.

    Is she really telling us that she can't substitute/reduce spending in one area in order to feed their kids? Is there really no money left?

    For example, say, as has been previously suggested, the husband has to travel a fair bit to work in a different Garda station which leads to higher fuel costs. Does he eat out or bring a packed lunch with him?

    Little things like this all add up as a big monthly expense without you even realizing it.


    I just feel if they closely examine their expenditure and write it down they will see the areas where sacrifices can be made and where spending can be reduced/cancelled.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,116 starviewadams


    Most likely union budget kite flying.


  • Registered Users Posts: 780 ✭✭✭ jackal


    Rabidlamb wrote: »
    My OP noted the big difference that my mortgage is half what they are paying.
    I spent less than €200k on a 4 bed in 2005 & got small tracker.
    Neither struggling or out of my depth I'm afraid.

    My mortgage costs less than rent & in 18 years I'll own the house, which will be nice.

    Ah yeah, sorry I forgot that bit. But what is your point about people living with mammy during the boom being out of their depth about?
    Rabidlamb wrote: »
    Health Insurance premiums
    Petrol for 2 cars
    Car loan repayments
    2x Car Insurance premiums
    2x Car tax
    2x Car upkeep costs
    Electricity
    Gas/Oil
    Weekly shop
    TV Licence
    Sky/UPC Sub
    Broadband
    Mobile contract & prepay top up
    Childcare
    Doctor visits
    Children's school expenses
    House upkeep & decoration costs
    Gardening costs
    Residents Committee/management fees
    Holiday savings
    Prescription medicines up to €130 per month

    As I've said, try walking in their shoes for a week & see how you get on.
    Of course they represent the high earning coping class which the government will gouge in the next budget for their huge disposable income.

    Of the things you mention there, would you insist on keeping all them and having "corn flakes days" or would you cut the cloth to suit your purse, if you had a bigger mortgage and were left with 109 a week?

    All the things highlighted are wants rather than needs, and certainly would not come before feeding your family if things got a bit tight.


  • Registered Users Posts: 465 ✭✭ Undercover Elephant


    blow69 wrote: »
    I just feel if they closely examine their expenditure and write it down they will see the areas where sacrifices can be made and where spending can be reduced/cancelled.

    The Department of Finance called. They said to shut up.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,876 Scortho


    I smell a rat! As others have said, there has to be additional debt somewhere else.

    And I always thought the Irish Times was the paper of record in this country...


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,781 ✭✭✭ yosser hughes


    Scortho wrote: »
    I smell a rat! As others have said, there has to be additional debt somewhere else.

    And I always thought the Irish Times was the paper of record in this country...

    They've now closed the comments section on that article too. Most of the comments posted thus far were sceptical about the story amd most were saying we weren't getting the full picture. Very shoddy journalism.

    edit:Sorry,there appears to be two articles on this in the IT. One has the comments section removed,the other is still open.My mistake.It probably makes sense to have the comments open for just the one article.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,318 ✭✭✭✭ Menas


    It is a pretty ridiculous article for the IT to publish. Surely the hack who put it together should have done a bit of due dilligence before publishing this drivel.

    The comments on their own webpage tend to reflect what is said on here.

    I reckon it is part of the GRA 'dont touch our allowances' pre budget posturing.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,032 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Bannasidhe


    MagicSean wrote: »



    Right, like yours was when you lost your job.

    What exactly is your problem with me?

    That I actually did cut my expenditure like hundreds of thousands of other in this country have had to do or that I didn't whinge to a newspaper?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,753 ✭✭✭ davet82


    i heard Brendan Howlin was behind the letters :P


This discussion has been closed.
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