Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie
Hi all,
Vanilla are planning an update to the site on April 24th (next Wednesday). It is a major PHP8 update which is expected to boost performance across the site. The site will be down from 7pm and it is expected to take about an hour to complete. We appreciate your patience during the update.
Thanks all.

Legalize Cannabis Ireland

  • 31-05-2011 7:35pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 4


    Greetings all,

    I would like to announce to anyone who may be interested that Legalize Cannabis Ireland is now starting a Mayo group. With the massive success of this years Cork Legalize march there has never been more momentum or more interest in the group and to help build on that our group has started expanding to new counties.

    If you are already interested in the cause of legalizing cannabis then you are probably aware of all the ridiculous and unjust reasons that this wonderful plant is prohibited, however if you are interested in the cause but don't know much about it just send me (LCI Mayo) a message on Facebook and I will be happy to send you on information and answer any questions you may have.

    I am from Mayo originally myself but am currently located in Cork and have been working with Cork legalize group for over year now. My goal is to set up a group meeting with anyone who is interested and would be willing to dedicate a little bit of their time to a great cause.

    If you are interested in taking part but would rather remain anonymous just private message me here or on Facebook.

    Heres a video of T.D Luke 'Ming' Flanagan's speech from the Cork March. If this doesn't motivate you then I look forward to hearing from you ;)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhv3fCq-LVw


«13456746

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭Mayo Miss


    No thanks. Not interested.


  • Registered Users Posts: 51,475 ✭✭✭✭tayto lover


    How is it a great cause ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    A great cause is helping people in need, the elderly, the youngm the poor. How the hell legalizing people getting wasted is a great cause is a complete mystery to me


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 LCIMayo


    A great cause is helping people in need, the elderly, the youngm the poor. How the hell legalizing people getting wasted is a great cause is a complete mystery to me

    Well let me be your Sherlock Holmes and unravel this mystery. Legalizing cannabis would be a massive economical boost for the country's tourism industry, has many proven medical benefits and its also a drug that cannot kill you.

    Those things you mentioned like helping poor and elderly people are indeed great causes and I have the greatest respect for people who follow those causes, but I do believe that legalizing cannabis so long if it is done correctly would be of great benefit to this country.

    Also in regards to the recreational use of cannabis. If you are genuinely that concerned for your health then put down that cigarette, cup of coffee and beer because alcohol, tobacco and caffeine are far more dangerous than cannabis and cause thousands deaths each year where cannabis causes none.

    Thanks for your response :)


  • Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 28,791 Mod ✭✭✭✭oscarBravo


    I don't have an issue with legalising cannabis, as long as I have the right as an employer to choose not to employ (or to fire) habitual users. I would also want to see MATs extended to include testing for blood cannabis levels.

    If people want to be stoners, whatever; as long as they're kept out of my workplace and off the roads.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 376 ✭✭Treora


    Sure the liquid lunch is gone years now and your office doesn't test everyone's urine at 2pm. Or does it?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 LCIMayo


    oscarBravo wrote: »
    I don't have an issue with legalising cannabis, as long as I have the right as an employer to choose not to employ (or to fire) habitual users. I would also want to see MATs extended to include testing for blood cannabis levels.

    If people want to be stoners, whatever; as long as they're kept out of my workplace and off the roads.

    I would agree with you completely in terms of testing drivers, driving under the influence of any drug prescription or not is dangerous. I do however disagree with your statement about having the option to fire someone on the basis that they smoke cannabis. Cannabis smokers are already in the work place and do just as good a job as non smokers.

    The responsibility lies with the individual and a cannabis smoker that shows up to work everyday on time should not be fired for it. Thats the same as say firing someone who supports a different football team i.e it is based completely on personal prejudice. The bottom line is and I am talking about a scenario where cannabis has been legalised, if it does not affect their work why should employers have the right to fire them.

    Thanks for your response.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,614 ✭✭✭ArtSmart


    oscarBravo wrote: »
    If people want to be stoners, whatever; as long as they're kept out of my workplace and off the roads.
    em, I believe the PC term is the 'disengaged'.


    ;)


  • Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 28,791 Mod ✭✭✭✭oscarBravo


    Treora wrote: »
    Sure the liquid lunch is gone years now and your office doesn't test everyone's urine at 2pm. Or does it?
    I have the legal right to dismiss someone summarily if they show up drunk for work. I don't see why I shouldn't have the right to dismiss someone for showing up stoned (or disengaged).
    LCIMayo wrote: »
    I would agree with you completely in terms of testing drivers, driving under the influence of any drug prescription or not is dangerous. I do however disagree with your statement about having the option to fire someone on the basis that they smoke cannabis. Cannabis smokers are already in the work place and do just as good a job as non smokers.
    Cannabis impairs judgement in much the same way as alcohol does. I expect people to show up at work with a BAC low enough to allow them to legally drive; if cannabis were legal I would expect the same.
    The responsibility lies with the individual...
    I'll come back to this.
    ...and a cannabis smoker that shows up to work everyday on time should not be fired for it.
    Clearly you're not an employer. I set a much higher standard from my employees than merely showing up on time. I expect them to show up on time, compos mentis and capable of making rational judgements.
    Thats the same as say firing someone who supports a different football team i.e it is based completely on personal prejudice. The bottom line is and I am talking about a scenario where cannabis has been legalised, if it does not affect their work why should employers have the right to fire them.
    If it doesn't affect their work, it's not a problem. The question is, how do we define "affect"? Managing to be physically present isn't a particularly useful metric.

    Going back to the personal responsibility point: you are demanding a new freedom; one which is not currently afforded in law. This freedom could have a side effect of allowing people to engage in a legal behaviour that affects their ability to do their job competently and safely. As an employer, I'm prepared to accept your new-found freedom to use drugs, in exchange for the freedom to insist that you only ever show up at work free of the effects of those drugs.

    How do we measure those effects? I don't know. But if you want support for the campaign to legalise drugs, you're going to have to help come up with answers to questions like that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    LCIMayo wrote: »
    Well let me be your Sherlock Holmes and unravel this mystery. Legalizing cannabis would be a massive economical boost for the country's tourism industry, has many proven medical benefits and its also a drug that cannot kill you.

    Those things you mentioned like helping poor and elderly people are indeed great causes and I have the greatest respect for people who follow those causes, but I do believe that legalizing cannabis so long if it is done correctly would be of great benefit to this country.

    Also in regards to the recreational use of cannabis. If you are genuinely that concerned for your health then put down that cigarette, cup of coffee and beer because alcohol, tobacco and caffeine are far more dangerous than cannabis and cause thousands deaths each year where cannabis causes none.

    Thanks for your response :)

    Yes, a boost in the tourist industry due to leaglizing cannibas, excellent, just what the country needs. More people off their trollies. And as I don't smoke I won't bother putting down my cigarette and please give me the links to research showing the huge amount of deaths attributed to caffeine each year.I also agree with OscarBravo on the issues relating to the work place. Any employer ( and indeed fellow employee ) has to expect people to turn up capabale of doing the work that they are paid to do, and if cannibas is legal whats to stop them having a sneaky spliff at lunchtime. Would you argue then that they are capable of doing their work fully after that?


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 922 ✭✭✭IrishKnight


    LCIMayo wrote: »
    has many proven medical benefits

    Just today I was watching a doc about weed and it got me thinking, seeing as you would be a person in the know, could you please provide me with a list of said proven medical benefits with reference to the relative scientific journals?

    Also can you comment on the findings of Moore et al 2007 regrading "...that cannabis increases risk of psychotic outcomes..."?

    Further, can you explain the reasoning behind the planned Netherland legalisation preventing tourists from buying weed in coffee shops.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,634 ✭✭✭jenno86


    Haha, ya right.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,731 ✭✭✭alex73


    WHAT A WASTE OF INTERNET SPACE!". Legalize Cannabis my arse!!. When I lived in Amsterdam is was the blight of the City and 80% of dutch hated the cafes there. It was a magnet of wasters.

    Whoever stated this threat must have nothing else to do with their time. Get a life, get a Job.


    (unless you are dying of cancer... then smoke as much as you like you have my full sympathy.)


  • Registered Users Posts: 922 ✭✭✭IrishKnight


    Wow, hold on guys, while I do not wholly agree the OP at least not until they provide me with the information I requested, I don't think there is any need to attack them. I also think it would be prudent that rather than simple negative comments about not wanting it, it might be an idea to explain why you are against it and allow the OP to respond in kind.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Regional Midwest Moderators, Regional West Moderators Posts: 16,722 Mod ✭✭✭✭yop


    Keep this thread on topic please and do not attack the poster.
    Alex73, you are on the verge, please refrain from any attacks of the post.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,731 ✭✭✭alex73


    yop wrote: »
    Keep this thread on topic please and do not attack the poster.
    Alex73, you are on the verge, please refrain from any attacks of the post.

    Unbelievable... So I am supposed to respect a group promoting an illegal activity?. Even in Amsterdam where it's legal u now have to register as Dutch user. So if the Dutch which is the only country to legalise cannabis are rolling back why the hell would ireland want to legalise drugs.... For Gods sake I have seen too many lives wasted with alcohol, let's not add more drugs. I have been on the front line of drugs!! I know the ugly picture, I have seen the ruin drugs have caused families. Don't worry when the group meets I will be there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 287 ✭✭James2693


    alex73 wrote: »
    Unbelievable... So I am supposed to respect a group promoting an illegal activity?. Even in Amsterdam where it's legal u now have to register as Dutch user. So if the Dutch which is the only country to legalise cannabis are rolling back why the hell would ireland want to legalise drugs.... For Gods sake I have seen too many lives wasted with alcohol, let's not add more drugs. I have been on the front line of drugs!! I know the ugly picture, I have seen the ruin drugs have caused families. Don't worry when the group meets I will be there.

    How ignorant can you get? Blinded by the media and fail to see the obvious benefits that can be had to our country from the legalization Between tax revenue and tourism.
    The older generation is te crux of the problem, they are the bulwark to the legalization. They fail to see the advantagtes of it. Stuck in the past.

    I have never smoked cannabis in my life. Butthe benefits are so clear its impossible to ignore them.

    You say you have seen lifes ruined by drugs? Fair enough, something I believe your are correct in. But the drugs that have ruined lives are class A hardcore drugs heroin/cocaine.
    Cannibas On the other hand is relatively harmless when used in moderation, on the Same scale as alcohol.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,391 ✭✭✭✭mikom


    alex73 wrote: »
    Unbelievable... So I am supposed to respect a group promoting an illegal activity?. Even in Amsterdam where it's legal u now have to register as Dutch user. So if the Dutch which is the only country to legalise cannabis are rolling back why the hell would ireland want to legalise drugs.... For Gods sake I have seen too many lives wasted with alcohol, let's not add more drugs. I have been on the front line of drugs!! I know the ugly picture, I have seen the ruin drugs have caused families. Don't worry when the group meets I will be there.

    So many inaccuracies in this post I don't know where to start.
    alex73 wrote: »
    Even in Amsterdam where it's legal u now have to register as Dutch user.

    Not yet, and possibly not at all as legislation has a way to go yet before it is passed.
    alex73 wrote: »
    Even in Amsterdam where it's legal

    Not legal, decriminalised.
    I thought you lived in Amsterdam for a while, so surely you should know that.
    Legal - "conforming to or permitted by law or established rules"Illegal - "not according to or authorized by law"Decriminalize - "to remove or reduce the criminal classification or status of; especially : to repeal a strict ban on while keeping under some form of regulation"
    alex73 wrote: »
    So if the Dutch which is the only country to legalise cannabis are rolling back why the hell would ireland want to legalise drugs

    Bearing in mind the legal/decriminalised difference, I have to ask.... Just the Dutch?


    Portugal......Decriminalized

    Spain...... growing and consumption at home legal

    Argentina........ Possession legal in quantities for personal use

    Germany...... Possession legal in quantities for personal use

    Ecuador...... Possession legal in quantities for personal use

    Belgium..... Consumption at home legal

    Canada..... Decriminalized for medical use

    Finland.... Decriminalized for medical use

    Israel...... Decriminalized for medical use

    I'd spend less time spitting anger and more time educating myself if I was you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    James2693 wrote: »
    How ignorant can you get? Blinded by the media and fail to see the obvious benefits that can be had to our country from the legalization Between tax revenue and tourism.
    The older generation is te crux of the problem, they are the bulwark to the legalization. They fail to see the advantagtes of it. Stuck in the past.

    I have never smoked cannabis in my life. Butthe benefits are so clear its impossible to ignore them.

    You say you have seen lifes ruined by drugs? Fair enough, something I believe your are correct in. But the drugs that have ruined lives are class A hardcore drugs heroin/cocaine.
    Cannibas On the other hand is relatively harmless when used in moderation, on the Same scale as alcohol.

    There would be absolutely no benefit in tourism terms, what a fallacy. Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,874 ✭✭✭✭PogMoThoin


    Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?

    Cigarettes and alcohol, No?

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with someone growing a plant in their garden to smoke (vapuorize/cook/bake because not everyone smokes) in the comfort of their own home.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 287 ✭✭James2693


    There would be absolutely no benefit in tourism terms, what a fallacy. Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?

    How would there be no benefit from tourism. Massive money can be made from people visiting Ireland. People will visit ireland, due to the fact Cannibas would be legal here. They would spend money on food/drink/accomodatin etc. They pay VAT=benefit to Ireland.

    What was the first drug they used? Just as the previous poster said. Alcohol and cigarettes.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,874 ✭✭✭✭PogMoThoin


    James2693 wrote: »
    How would there be no benefit from tourism. Massive money can be made from people visiting Ireland. People will visit ireland, due to the fact Cannibas would be legal here. They would spend money on food/drink/accomodatin etc. They pay VAT=benefit to Ireland.

    Course the airports are full of stoners heading to Portugal since they decriminalised. Its foolish to think it'll do anything for tourism.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,391 ✭✭✭✭mikom


    Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?

    I could go even further and say Caffeine..... you know that psychoactive stimulant in coffee, tea, red bull, and a host of energy drinks (the ones that may be supped at a sporting event).
    I could push your gateway fallacy out even further by saying that most children alter their brains even in the playground.
    Ever spun around until you got dizzy?
    I have.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 287 ✭✭James2693


    PogMoThoin wrote: »
    Course the airports are full of stoners heading to Portugal since they decriminalised. Its foolish to think it'll do anything for tourism.

    We are talking about legalizing it though not decrminalisibg it.

    Btw I live how you have just avoided the other point mikom and I are making about alcohol/cigarettes are just as bad. Nice ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    PogMoThoin wrote: »
    Cigarettes and alcohol, No?

    I see absolutely nothing wrong with someone growing a plant in their garden to smoke (vapuorize/cook/bake because not everyone smokes) in the comfort of their own home.

    There are people who see absolutely no harm in killing someone who p***ses them off, that type of argument can be used for anything.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    mikom wrote: »
    I could go even further and say Caffeine..... you know that psychoactive stimulant in coffee, tea, red bull, and a host of energy drinks (the ones that may be supped at a sporting event).
    I could push your gateway fallacy out even further by saying that most children alter their brains even in the playground.
    Ever spun around until you got dizzy?
    I have.

    I am still waiting for the links to the studies saying using caffeine has serious detrimental effects? Any chance of someone putting them up and proving what they say? And can you seriously compare the effects of motion on the vestibular system with smoking weed on a regular basis?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,391 ✭✭✭✭mikom


    There are people who see absolutely no harm in killing someone who p***ses them off, that type of argument can be used for anything.

    Remember what a balls up alcohol prohibition in the USA was.
    How many people did Al Capone have murdered to facilitate the selling of blackmarket booze.

    Alcohol was legalised and the murders from alcohol smuggling and illegal sale dried up.
    Is this becoming any clearer....... the whole prohibition problem.

    Repeating the mistakes of history is madness.



    Originally Posted by HarryPotter41 View Post
    Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?

    You got your answer, Caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol.
    Now you come looking for reports?
    Regular caffeine consumption reduces sensitivity to caffeine. When caffeine intake is reduced, the body becomes oversensitive to adenosine. In response to this oversensitiveness, blood pressure drops dramatically, causing an excess of blood in the head (though not necessarily on the brain), leading to a headache.

    This headache, well known among coffee drinkers, usually lasts from one to five days, and can be alleviated with analgesics such as aspirin. It is also alleviated with caffeine intake (in fact several analgesics contain caffeine dosages).

    Often, people who are reducing caffeine intake report being irritable, unable to work, nervous, restless, and feeling sleepy, as well as having a headache. In extreme cases, nausea and vomiting has also been reported.

    References.

    Caffeine and Health. J. E. James, Academic Press, 1991. Progress in Clinical and Biological Research Volume 158. G. A. Spiller, Ed. Alan R. Liss Inc, 1984.

    You can ask a few boardsies about it here........ Caffeine withdrawal headache?
    And can you seriously compare the effects of motion on the vestibular system with smoking weed on a regular basis?

    You asked about about first drugs taken...... I extended it to ways people and children alter their consciousness.
    I dare say there are a sight more injuries from spinning around induced dizziness than smoking weed.
    Aged 6 or 7 my sister walked into the corner of a table and received a nasty nick on her cheek after one such spin around session.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,402 ✭✭✭HarryPotter41


    mikom wrote: »
    Remember what a balls up alcohol prohibition in the USA was.
    How many people did Al Capone have murdered to facilitate the selling of blackmarket booze.

    Alcohol was legalised and the murders from alcohol smuggling and illegal sale dried up.
    Is this becoming any clearer....... the whole prohibition problem.

    Repeating the mistakes of history is madness.



    Originally Posted by HarryPotter41 View Post
    Also maybe ask the hard drug user what drug was the first they ever took?

    You got your answer, Caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol.
    Now you come looking for reports?



    You can ask a few boardsies about it here........ Caffeine withdrawal headache?

    Strangely have never suffered from it. And it causes a headache and a certain amount of irritibality. As opposed to distorted perception, anxiety, loss of coordination, increased heart rate, reduced blood pressure and worse effects from heavy usage. Will take my chance with my cup of kenco any day.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16,391 ✭✭✭✭mikom


    Will take my chance with my cup of kenco any day.

    Your choice..... and isn't it great to have that choice.
    Many are not so lucky, and so must keep what they enjoy under wraps for fear of the repercussions.
    Do you prefer to see people oppressed?
    I notice you sidestepped the prohibition issue.

    By the way.......

    Coffee containing caffeine can cause insomnia, nervousness and restlessness, stomach upset, nausea and vomiting, increased heart and breathing rate, and other side effects. Consuming large amounts of coffee might also cause headache, anxiety, agitation, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeats.

    Children: It may be unsafe for children to drink caffeinated coffee. The side effects associated with caffeine are usually more severe in children than adults.

    Anxiety disorders: The caffeine in coffee might make anxiety worse.

    Bleeding disorders: There is some concern that coffee might make bleeding disorders worse.

    Heart disease: Drinking unfiltered (boiled) coffee increases the amount of cholesterol and other fats in the blood, and also raises the level of homocysteine, all of which are associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease. Some research suggests an association between heart attacks and drinking coffee.

    Diabetes: Some research suggests that caffeine contained in coffee might change the way people with diabetes process sugar. Caffeine has been reported to cause increases as well as decreases in blood sugar. Use caffeine with caution if you have diabetes and monitor your blood sugar carefully.

    Glaucoma: Drinking caffeinated coffee increases pressure inside the eye. The increase starts within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes.

    High blood pressure: Drinking caffeinated coffee might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, this effect might be less in people who drink coffee regularly.

    Thinning bones (osteoporosis): Drinking caffeinated coffee can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. This might weaken bones. If you have osteoporosis, limit caffeine consumption to less than 300 mg per day (approximately 2-3 cups of coffee). Taking calcium supplements may help to make up for calcium that is lost. Postmenopausal women who have an inherited condition that keeps them from processing vitamin D normally, should be especially cautious when using caffeine.


    Scare stories!!
    Boo!


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 37,295 ✭✭✭✭the_syco


    oscarBravo wrote: »
    I have the legal right to dismiss someone summarily if they show up drunk for work. I don't see why I shouldn't have the right to dismiss someone for showing up stoned (or disengaged).
    I support the use of being allowed to smoke weed, but I also support this point of view, as I don't like working with people under the influence of alcohol, nor anyone being stoned whilst driving.

    There is one problem, however: if X was in the vicinity of Y smoking weed (for example; in a pub), X would test positive for about four weeks after having inhaled the 2nd hand fumes.

    If we do legalize it, we need some sort of test to see if the person was under the influence at the time of the test.


Advertisement