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Counselling Course

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  • The two 4 year MA programs I've found that theoretically accept someone without a BA in psychology / counselling / social work are integrated and don't seem to have much emphasis on CBT, but I don't seem to have much of a choice. What makes the BA in counselling + MA in CBT from ICHAS route less good?

    If you want to study CBT, then you'd want to look at what will give you accreditation with the two bodies that give European-level accreditation - iCBT (part of the Irish Council for Psychotherapy, and thus the European Council for Psychotherapy) and the IABCP (part of the EABCT). When CORU gets going on Counsellor/Psychotherapy accreditation in Ireland, this will be taken into account. They have a better and longer track record than <snip> ICHAS.




  • PCI offer a part-time degree course, then you can specialise in CBT. Either way it's a long process, but the courses are really enjoyable. Don't start your own therapy until you start your course because it won't apply. You won't get a SUSI grant for PCI (or for ANY part time course). PCI are a business though, remember that - you are going to spend a lot of money on this line of work. Not only to get going, but also to keep up with CPD over the years, and you will ALWAYS have to pay your own therapist/Supervisor. ICHAS are excellent as well - did a course there last year. I did the foundation course with PCI and it was worth it. It's a tough course, a tough job. Do the foundation course and make sure it's what you really want in reality.




  • Shoobs86 wrote: »
    PCI offer a part-time degree course, then you can specialise in CBT. Either way it's a long process, but the courses are really enjoyable. Don't start your own therapy until you start your course because it won't apply. You won't get a SUSI grant for PCI (or for ANY part time course). PCI are a business though, remember that - you are going to spend a lot of money on this line of work. Not only to get going, but also to keep up with CPD over the years, and you will ALWAYS have to pay your own therapist/Supervisor. ICHAS are excellent as well - did a course there last year. I did the foundation course with PCI and it was worth it. It's a tough course, a tough job. Do the foundation course and make sure it's what you really want in reality.

    I assume that there is a sort of trade done among counsellors, e.g. I counsel Steve, Steve counsels Fiona, Fiona counsels me.. . etc etc. Well it would need to be bigger because maybe Fiona will need to talk to Steve about issues that I'm causing her.. anyway

    My only real concern is that I will actually be able to get work in this and that I have the money to do the courses I need to do, not how much it costs or how much I'll be paid. I think if I work in it at all I'll have at least enough money to keep me fed and warm, that's what I have now, I'm happy with that!

    I've signed up for a certificate course all right :) We'll see how it all goes.




  • Can I ask a question?

    If I got a BA in counselling and psychotherapy, worked my 2 years and got accredited (maybe get a professional cert in CBT in the meantime), would I be likely to be accepted for the trinity higher diploma in CBT? And if I was, would I be likely to then be able to do the MA in CBT?

    Well, there'd be some saving to be done in between... but anyway! Plenty of time.

    Do the foundation course and make sure it's what you really want in reality.
    I'm doing it this summer... Is a certificate course a good way to know you really want to do it? "Am I likely to do the certificate course and still realize half way through 1st year shooooooooooooooooooooot, this isn't for me, I should be a cattle rustler!"




  • Can I ask a question?

    If I got a BA in counselling and psychotherapy, worked my 2 years and got accredited (maybe get a professional cert in CBT in the meantime), would I be likely to be accepted for the trinity higher diploma in CBT? And if I was, would I be likely to then be able to do the MA in CBT?

    Well, there'd be some saving to be done in between... but anyway! Plenty of time.



    I'm doing it this summer... Is a certificate course a good way to know you really want to do it? "Am I likely to do the certificate course and still realize half way through 1st year shooooooooooooooooooooot, this isn't for me, I should be a cattle rustler!"

    I can speak to the second part of your question. I completed the PCI Certificate course (last night, actually) and found it both very informative and very rewarding in terms of personal development and development of counselling skills.

    I would estimate about half or a little more of the class will be going forward with their studies. For others, it was a very positive experience but not one which has inspired them to change career.

    All of our class agreed that it was a very worthy undertaking though so I highly recommend it.


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  • I've been reading back over this thread, some very knowledgeable people here so here goes....

    Primary school teacher with 13 years experience. LOVE my job and the demands that come with it but i don't feel fully eqipped to deal with those demands anymore.
    Parents confiding in me about issues and my only answer is "speak to your GP". Children confiding in me about worries/ issues/ concerns that they have and i advise as best i (legally) can, always following the guidelines that are in place.
    I'm named on our Critical incident policy as the contact person for parents following an incident but I really don't feel qualified for this role. (An issue that i will speak to my principal and BoM about.)

    Child and adolescent counselling and therapy is an area that i want to further my studies in. I'm a mam to a two year old and a 4 month old and will have to continue working fulltime so i will need to go down the part-time route. Can anyone advise of a suitable course i could start thinking about? I don't think a masters/ postgrad on my existing degree is sufficent in my case but hopefully someone here can advise?

    Thanks in advance




  • Even if you do that sort of course you are employed as a teacher so would only be within your remit to speak to parents within that role not with your counsellor hat on so to speak. Something to keep in mind.




  • Plan would be to qualify myself and step away from the classroom in the future. Any course would be of benefit to offer advice now but a qualification would allow me to counsel others professionally (ie: move away from fulltime teaching to counselling/ psychotherapy).

    I'm talking about a 10 year plan here but would appreciate guidance on how i could go about doing this? Ie: would a masters with PCI be a good move?




  • heldel00 wrote: »
    Plan would be to qualify myself and step away from the classroom in the future. Any course would be of benefit to offer advice now but a qualification would allow me to counsel others professionally (ie: move away from fulltime teaching to counselling/ psychotherapy).

    I'm talking about a 10 year plan here but would appreciate guidance on how i could go about doing this? Ie: would a masters with PCI be a good move?


    Hi, IICP college have a new masters in Child and Adolescent counselling and therapy starting this autumn. Good luck!




  • Kitty if I'm reading the course overview correctly it seems to be for practising therapists rather than the likes of me?


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  • You could look at something like Mental Health First Aid - this is a basic 2 day thing and not really geared towards children, nor will it give you any accreditation. I've no affiliation other than having done it. You're primary so it might be hard to convince colleagues (training is in groups, afaik) to do it as it'll lack relevance if they are not encountering some of the disclosures coming to you. Maybe talk to a guidance counsellor at secondary level for suggestions.

    I don't know the ins and outs of training courses, but it seems to always come down to walking before you can run. Put less emphasis on specialising in children and adolescents for now and get a good foundation in theories, background knowledge and skills you'll need. It sounds like you're doing the right thing otherwise - signposting and. Good idea to speak to your BoM and principal.

    How about the likes of Open University?




  • heldel00 wrote: »
    Plan would be to qualify myself and step away from the classroom in the future. Any course would be of benefit to offer advice now but a qualification would allow me to counsel others professionally (ie: move away from fulltime teaching to counselling/ psychotherapy).

    I'm talking about a 10 year plan here but would appreciate guidance on how i could go about doing this? Ie: would a masters with PCI be a good move?

    I see you didn’t say this in your post but this sounds much more realistic! I know there is a good counselling course in Trinity but as I am in teaching field others here will have better advice for you. Good luck.




  • Shameless bump:
    Can I ask a question?

    If I got a BA in counselling and psychotherapy, worked my 2 years and got accredited (maybe get a professional cert in CBT in the meantime), would I be likely to be accepted for the trinity higher diploma in CBT? And if I was, would I be likely to then be able to do the MA in CBT? Could I.. and this sounds like a real pipe dream... even skip the H.dip and go for the MA?

    Well, there'd be some saving to be done in between... but anyway! Plenty of time.

    Anyone?




  • Any advice on how to qualify as a child psychologist while keeping my job as a secondary teacher? I can do loads of distance learning if needed.




  • ggg16 wrote: »
    Any advice on how to qualify as a child psychologist while keeping my job as a secondary teacher? I can do loads of distance learning if needed.

    It’s a 3 year full time doctorate now.




  • You don't mean child counsellor though, do you? There are lots of courses in that.. THis + your teaching qualification MIGHT be an acceptable prerequisite but you'd have to ask the college you'd be applying to for the masters: https://www.dbs.ie/child-psychology/evening-diploma . I don't think it would be, I think you'd have to do the undergraduate in counselling.

    and then do one of the masters on offer focusing on children and teenagers. For example

    http://www.pcicollege.ie/counselling-courses/child-adolescent-counselling-psychotherapy


    Just thought this might be what you mean because you posted in the counselling course. When I think "child psychologist" I think things like diagnosing dyslexia and writing research papers about bullying, not sitting and talking to a kid who needs emotional support.




  • I just found out how much Turning Point actually costs.. It says on the website 5000 for first year, which makes you assume the other years are similar. Not only do you have to pay for the 200 hours of personal therapy they want you to do (which is what made me realize I couldn't afford it )it is not 5000 a year, that is the cheapest year, some years cost as much as 10,000.

    No. Way. José.




  • The variation in fees and qualifications needs to be looked at closely i feel.. I notice in my local paper that people advertise counselling but baulk when called and asked about what they have studied, with expanding awareness about mental health this is deeply unhelpful.




  • The variation in fees and qualifications needs to be looked at closely i feel.. I notice in my local paper that people advertise counselling but baulk when called and asked about what they have studied, with expanding awareness about mental health this is deeply unhelpful.


    If they baulk they must not be qualified. It won't be long before it will be illegal to call themselves counsellors and they'll have to say "life coach" etc. Another benefit of the Yes vote in the referendum is that they are fast tracking the protection of the tittles "counsellor" and "psychotherapist" .

    The fee is the fee, but the fact they try to make it look as if it is priced similarly to similar MAs is pretty manipulative. A "low ball" as Cialdini would say...


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