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Counselling Course

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  • Hi all, I'm new to Boards and am thinking about doing the PCI foundation course. It says on the application form that there's a €450 non refundable deposit - now I know this comes across as a pretty stupid question....but what happens if I put up the cash and don't get accepted to the course? Do I just lose the money?

    I see a few people (earlier in the thread) have had good experiences on this course and although it's expensive I think (hope) it gives a good insight into the field. Can anyone confirm that who has maybe completed the foundation and gone on the the B.Sc?

    All advice/feedback is much appreciated!




  • I can't find anything on their website about assessment etc - is there a coursework component? Exam? Are there any textbooks needed?




  • I did the sensible thing and actually called them (PCI) to ask my questions. But I would be really interested in hearing from anyone who has completed the Foundation course...I'm going to book a place by this evening.




  • Ruthie B wrote: »
    I can't find anything on their website about assessment etc - is there a coursework component? Exam? Are there any textbooks needed?

    As far as I kmow there is a small essay to be handed in.




  • Ruthie B wrote: »
    I did the sensible thing and actually called them (PCI) to ask my questions. But I would be really interested in hearing from anyone who has completed the Foundation course...I'm going to book a place by this evening.

    I know lots of people who have done the course, enjoyed it, and gone on to train as counsellors.


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  • Thanks very much for the responses guys. I have to say, I'm, really looking forward to it now...roll on Monday!




  • i did this course this year. the work involves keeping a journal of how you experience the course,then writing a 1000 word essay on your own development throughout the foundation course.
    then you must do a book review of 1500 words.
    its a great course,and you will meet some interesting people.enjoy,and embrace the change a comin!
    ian




  • Hey Ian,

    Thanks for your input - the assignments sound interesting. I'm really excited about starting! Did you go on to do the Dip/B.Sc?




  • Anyone else doing the NUI Certificate in Counselling Skills??




  • Hi,
    I have a question in relation to practising outside Ireland... I have just started my training at the Tivoli Institute and in the future would be curious about moving to the States or Australia once I am fully accredited; and I am wondering how straightforward it would be to do this in terms of becoming members of the relevant counselling and psychotherapy accrediting bodies in these countries. If anyone has any knowledge on this topic please reply :)


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  • Hi all,

    I have a background in hypnotherapy but I am looking into gaining a qualification as a psychotherapist. I rang the Tivoli Institute to inquire about attending any upcoming open days but I was told to ask any questions I had over the phone. Maybe the person I spoke to was having an off day or perhaps my queries weren't properly prepared but TBH it wasn't the most helpful Q&A session I have ever been part of.

    Their website highlights the opportunity to apply to the University of Sheffield's Msc in Psychotherapy Studies to graduates of the Tivoli's 3 year programme. I had previously contacted Sheffield to get some info and the reply I recieved was

    "I am sorry to inform you but the MSc in Psychotherapy Studies is now closed and will not be taking any more admissions , there is going to be another course introduced but nothing has been clarified yet."

    Please also see http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/current/mps

    When I raised this with Tivoli my information was dismissed as incorrect and I was asked is there anything else I needed to help with.

    From reading this thread and several others, I suppose my major concern is that if their wasn't an opportunity to top up the Tivoli diploma it may leave the qualification a little exposed and not future proof it.

    Apologies if any of my facts are incorrect and I would really appreciate anyones experiences of Tivoli/Sheffield.

    Also I am mindful of the financial and time commitments this course requires so can those of you better informed than myself give me an indication of the employment prospects for graduates....ie to be blunt are there jobs in psychotherapy for someone successfully following this route?

    P.S I am based in Waterford so my attendance would be on a commute basis with the exception of any potential weekend course similar to that of the Tivoili Institute.

    Thanks for any advice/info anyone can offer




  • emart100 wrote: »
    Hi all,

    I have a background in hypnotherapy but I am looking into gaining a qualification as a psychotherapist. I rang the Tivoli Institute to inquire about attending any upcoming open days but I was told to ask any questions I had over the phone. Maybe the person I spoke to was having an off day or perhaps my queries weren't properly prepared but TBH it wasn't the most helpful Q&A session I have ever been part of.

    Their website highlights the opportunity to apply to the University of Sheffield's Msc in Psychotherapy Studies to graduates of the Tivoli's 3 year programme. I had previously contacted Sheffield to get some info and the reply I recieved was

    "I am sorry to inform you but the MSc in Psychotherapy Studies is now closed and will not be taking any more admissions , there is going to be another course introduced but nothing has been clarified yet."

    Please also see http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/current/mps

    When I raised this with Tivoli my information was dismissed as incorrect and I was asked is there anything else I needed to help with.

    From reading this thread and several others, I suppose my major concern is that if their wasn't an opportunity to top up the Tivoli diploma it may leave the qualification a little exposed and not future proof it.

    Apologies if any of my facts are incorrect and I would really appreciate anyones experiences of Tivoli/Sheffield.

    Also I am mindful of the financial and time commitments this course requires so can those of you better informed than myself give me an indication of the employment prospects for graduates....ie to be blunt are there jobs in psychotherapy for someone successfully following this route?

    P.S I am based in Waterford so my attendance would be on a commute basis with the exception of any potential weekend course similar to that of the Tivoili Institute.

    Thanks for any advice/info anyone can offer

    Have you looked at any of the courses run by DBS or The Independent college? There is a good choice there just as a starter.




  • emnic wrote: »
    Hi,
    I have a question in relation to practising outside Ireland... I have just started my training at the Tivoli Institute and in the future would be curious about moving to the States or Australia once I am fully accredited; and I am wondering how straightforward it would be to do this in terms of becoming members of the relevant counselling and psychotherapy accrediting bodies in these countries. If anyone has any knowledge on this topic please reply :)

    The best answer you will get is to contact the professional body the course allows you to join after graduation, they will know or should at least be able to get the answer for you.




  • emart100 wrote: »
    Hi all,

    I have a background in hypnotherapy but I am looking into gaining a qualification as a psychotherapist. I rang the Tivoli Institute to inquire about attending any upcoming open days but I was told to ask any questions I had over the phone. Maybe the person I spoke to was having an off day or perhaps my queries weren't properly prepared but TBH it wasn't the most helpful Q&A session I have ever been part of.

    Their website highlights the opportunity to apply to the University of Sheffield's Msc in Psychotherapy Studies to graduates of the Tivoli's 3 year programme. I had previously contacted Sheffield to get some info and the reply I recieved was

    "I am sorry to inform you but the MSc in Psychotherapy Studies is now closed and will not be taking any more admissions , there is going to be another course introduced but nothing has been clarified yet."

    Please also see http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/scharr/current/mps

    When I raised this with Tivoli my information was dismissed as incorrect and I was asked is there anything else I needed to help with.

    From reading this thread and several others, I suppose my major concern is that if their wasn't an opportunity to top up the Tivoli diploma it may leave the qualification a little exposed and not future proof it.

    Apologies if any of my facts are incorrect and I would really appreciate anyones experiences of Tivoli/Sheffield.

    Also I am mindful of the financial and time commitments this course requires so can those of you better informed than myself give me an indication of the employment prospects for graduates....ie to be blunt are there jobs in psychotherapy for someone successfully following this route?

    P.S I am based in Waterford so my attendance would be on a commute basis with the exception of any potential weekend course similar to that of the Tivoili Institute.

    Thanks for any advice/info anyone can offer
    Why not consider the Masters in Psychotherapy (PAC Code DC715) at DCU
    This four year, part-time programme is integrative in
    nature and provides comprehensive academic and
    practical grounding in psychotherapy with entry routes at
    year 1 and year 3 of the programme. Upon completion
    of the programme, students will be awarded an MSc
    in Psychotherapy. Participants who have successfully
    completed 60 credits will have the option to exit
    at the end of year two with a Graduate Diploma in
    Psychotherapy.
    Entry Routes and Requirements
    Applicants must hold a relevant undergraduate degree
    (NFQ level 8), have relevant practical experience in
    the helping professions and be able to demonstrate
    personal suitability. If an applicant does not hold
    the required academic qualifications or relevant
    experience, his/her application will be reviewed
    through an APEL (accreditation of prior experiential
    learning) process. Please note that applicants who
    already hold a Graduate Diploma in Psychotherapy
    or equivalent may be eligible to apply for entry to
    year 3 to complete the MSc in Psychotherapy.
    Closing date for receipt of completed
    applications: Friday, 29 April 2011.

    To apply for these programmes, visit the Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC) at www.pac.ie to complete
    an online application.
    For further information, contact: The School of Nursing, Dublin City University, tel: +353 (0) 1 700 5947
    email: [email protected]




  • I welcome Gerry Moore being on here and it would be great for us if he contributed in the future. In the spirit of the transparency which we have required of others recommending courses it should be pointed out that he is from the school of nursing in DCU.




  • hotspur wrote: »
    I welcome Gerry Moore being on here and it would be great for us if he contributed in the future. In the spirit of the transparency which we have required of others recommending courses it should be pointed out that he is from the school of nursing in DCU.

    Yeah I was awear of that Hotspur, I was standing back to see if Mr Moore would disclose this info himself. However, this is one of the reasons why this forum can be a pleasure to mod, regular posters like yourself take a their imput here seriously and very ethically.

    However, as the cat is out of the bag, so to speak, I would second your welcome and hope that Gerry continues to post here.




  • Odysseus wrote: »
    Yeah I was awear of that Hotspur, I was standing back to see if Mr Moore would disclose this info himself. However, this is one of the reasons why this forum can be a pleasure to mod, regular posters like yourself take a their imput here seriously and very ethically.

    However, as the cat is out of the bag, so to speak, I would second your welcome and hope that Gerry continues to post here.
    Hi Guys no deception intended, I certainly do work in DCU and on the programme I have suggested, I have no problem about entering into a discussion about psychotherapy training and would advise anyone considering same to look at as many options as possible to find the programme that best suits their needs. Gerry




  • Thanks a lot for the pointers Gerry and Odysseus. I will certainly look into all the options mentioned.

    Just to throw another course into the mix...is the psychotherapy degree at PCI well regarded against others on offer at DBS and elsewhere? Does it carry the same clout as the Tivoli route and are there major differences in content? The reason I ask is that as I have already mentioned, I live in Waterford and the PCI degree in Kilkenny would be a very convenient option for me. Naturally I wouldn't sacrifice quality for convenience and I would welcome any input so as to make an informed decision.

    I suppose there are a couple of specific areas of concern highlighted by others in this thread, namely the quantity of academic content available and the quota of personal therapy hours which stands at 50 for the PCI.....hopefully I have my facts straight on this figure.

    Thanks




  • Hi Guys no deception intended, I certainly do work in DCU and on the programme I have suggested, I have no problem about entering into a discussion about psychotherapy training and would advise anyone considering same to look at as many options as possible to find the programme that best suits their needs. Gerry

    No please don't get me wrong, I didn't think any deception was intended. I would be aware of you and your background. Sounds a bit stalkerist:eek:

    No I did the B.A. in Psychoanalytic Studies in LSB a few years after you did, I think one of my friends was in your year. I don't want to mention names but he is senior counsellor for the East Coast Addiction Services. Another friend was Education Officer in the Addiction Services and you both worked around a few things. I don't think I have met you personally.

    Anyway above is just a bit of waffle, I doubted that you where aware of anything issues coming from your post. I just think that as Hotspur noted we need to be clear and open around certain issues. Now that it is in the open I think it's dealt with. We just have a history of people with new accounts pimping their course or programme without declaring their involvement, I don't think you would have been aware of that though, to be fair.

    I hope you continue to post here, one it will be great for anyone with any interest around your courses there. However, it would be good to just have you as a forum member who engages in some of the topics we discuss, especially as I know you would be familiar with Freud and Lacan.

    So a bit of a long winded response, but maybe you would consider saying a bit about yourself in the Introduction thread. I hope that clears the issues up




  • Hi Odysseus, I have no problem with you questioning my motivation / intentions and am chuffed at the idea of a stalker (joke). I certainly intend to continue to post here as long as my input can add something to the conversation. Well stick something up about myself in the introduction thread.


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  • emart100 wrote: »
    Thanks a lot for the pointers Gerry and Odysseus. I will certainly look into all the options mentioned.

    Just to throw another course into the mix...is the psychotherapy degree at PCI well regarded against others on offer at DBS and elsewhere? Does it carry the same clout as the Tivoli route and are there major differences in content? The reason I ask is that as I have already mentioned, I live in Waterford and the PCI degree in Kilkenny would be a very convenient option for me. Naturally I wouldn't sacrifice quality for convenience and I would welcome any input so as to make an informed decision.

    I suppose there are a couple of specific areas of concern highlighted by others in this thread, namely the quantity of academic content available and the quota of personal therapy hours which stands at 50 for the PCI.....hopefully I have my facts straight on this figure.

    Thanks
    Picking the correct course is always difficult but it is not a lottery. What you need to think about is both your motivation to do a psychotherapy programme and what if anything you can do with what you learn on that programme when you graduate.
    If I was trying to decide which programme I wanted to follow I would look at the following;
    • What is the theoretical framework on which the programme is based (e.g. psychoanalytic, CBT, Humanistic, Systemic, Integrative etc, and am I interested in working in that style)?
    • What is the course cost, duration and delivery method (can I afford to do it)?
    • How is the course accredited?
    • At the end of the programme will I have achieved a recognisable degree that will allow me to work towards accreditation with a recognised professional organisation?
    • What balance is there on the course between theory, personal development and clinical experience (not all programme incorporate all three elements)
    Hope these basic questions help.




  • I'm currently doing this course with DCU and Turning Point- I can't recommend it highly enough!! There was an error in the earlier post describing it though- the Graduate DIploma is awarded at the end of year 3 as opposed to year 2. (Unless I'm wrong- in which case I'd be delighted to get it a year earlier!!) Anyone curious google Turning Point because the course is run from there and it gives a good sense of the ethos of the course- you don't really have much to do with DCU- but it feels kinda cool to have a student card from there!! :-) Turning point also run a foundation course in January- I didn't do it but I would imagine it's excellent, the tutors are top class and there's a huge emphasis on personal process, so the foundation would be similar. Even if you don't go on to do the MSc the process work is fascinating! If in doubt- do it! :-)




  • fannymagee wrote: »
    I'm currently doing this course with DCU and Turning Point- I can't recommend it highly enough!! There was an error in the earlier post describing it though- the Graduate DIploma is awarded at the end of year 3 as opposed to year 2. (Unless I'm wrong- in which case I'd be delighted to get it a year earlier!!) Anyone curious google Turning Point because the course is run from there and it gives a good sense of the ethos of the course- you don't really have much to do with DCU- but it feels kinda cool to have a student card from there!! :-) Turning point also run a foundation course in January- I didn't do it but I would imagine it's excellent, the tutors are top class and there's a huge emphasis on personal process, so the foundation would be similar. Even if you don't go on to do the MSc the process work is fascinating! If in doubt- do it! :-)
    Hi Fannymagee,
    delighted to hear that you are taking and enjoying the DUC/Turning Point Psychotherapy programme and you are quire correct that the Graduate Diploma is awarded at the end of year 3 on the programme you have registered on which is the MSc in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. However the programme I have described, the Masters in Psychotherapy (PAC Code DC715) at DCU here is a separate programme run and delivered in DCU by DCU and has a different structure that allows students to exit at the end of year 2 with a graduate diploma. Best of luck in your studies, Gerry.




  • Hi Gerry,

    Oh I no idea there were two psychotherapy Masters courses running out of DCU! Is the two year course full-time so, or what's the difference between them?




  • Hi All,

    I'm applying for the Certificate in Counseling skills course in CIT these Autumn.
    Just wondering if anyone has any experience of this course and if it is a viable springboard towards pursuing counseling as a career in the long term?

    Is there a better part time option I could look in the Cork Area?

    Any advise anyone could give would be great.




  • fannymagee wrote: »
    Hi Gerry,

    Oh I no idea there were two psychotherapy Masters courses running out of DCU! Is the two year course full-time so, or what's the difference between them?
    hI Fannymcgee,
    the course differences are significant in terms of content and delivery methods, the differences are too numerous to describe here but if you go to the DCU website www.dcu.ie and put the course titles given in my last mail into the search box you will be able to get course and module descriptors. Both courses are part-time. A Graduate Diploma is achieved by accruing a specified amount of University credits which are awarded for each successfully completed module and this is what dictates the duration of a programme.
    Gerry




  • Hi All,

    This is the only thread I could find that starts to provide any information on the DCU Masters in Psychotherapy and the Turning Point Masters in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. Can anyone help in clarifying the differences? I know Gerry says above that they have different content and delivery methods but from their brochures both courses sound very similar and I'm really confused as to which one to go for. I have interviews for both and I don't want to make the wrong choice (if I get a choice that is). Any clarification would be a help! :)


    Has anyone done one of these courses or know anyone that has? They are both done over 4 years in part-time block segments. I know for the Turning Point course on top of the block weekends personal therapy, peer counselling and study groups are required each week, is it the same for the DCU course?
    Also which one has a better reputation, and does it matter when looking for a job? Does one of them have better placement connections than the other?

    I know the turning point course used to be affiliated with DCU but is now affiliated with UCC - are there politics involved there or is there a bigger picture I'm not seeing?

    Sorry for all the questions but my head is in a muddle over this and any help would be greatly appreciated!!!




  • Sparkles14 wrote: »
    Hi All,

    This is the only thread I could find that starts to provide any information on the DCU Masters in Psychotherapy and the Turning Point Masters in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. Can anyone help in clarifying the differences? I know Gerry says above that they have different content and delivery methods but from their brochures both courses sound very similar and I'm really confused as to which one to go for. I have interviews for both and I don't want to make the wrong choice (if I get a choice that is). Any clarification would be a help! :)


    Has anyone done one of these courses or know anyone that has? They are both done over 4 years in part-time block segments. I know for the Turning Point course on top of the block weekends personal therapy, peer counselling and study groups are required each week, is it the same for the DCU course?
    Also which one has a better reputation, and does it matter when looking for a job? Does one of them have better placement connections than the other?

    I know the turning point course used to be affiliated with DCU but is now affiliated with UCC - are there politics involved there or is there a bigger picture I'm not seeing?

    Sorry for all the questions but my head is in a muddle over this and any help would be greatly appreciated!!!

    Yes I did Turning Point, loved it, and four years on I still can't recommend it highly enough. It is INTENSE, (and expensive) but absolutely worth it IMO. Do not underestimate the commitment required though, it is HUGE, esp in third year. And yes it is highly respected- no problems getting placements etc it has a great reputation. If you're ready to go deep and be challenged left right and centre, do it! :-)




  • I am finished first year in Turning Point and love it. It is expensive (like all psychotherapy courses) and intensive but I have no regrets about choosing Turning Point.

    The reason I picked it over the DCU course was primarily that Turning Point appeared to be better regarded (both IAHIP and IACP). I see DCU are now IACP accredited - they weren't last year. Other than that I know little about the DCU course but assume by the time you are finished that it will be well established and well regarded too. Think DCU's weekends were all day Thursday, Friday and Saturday which didn't suit me as well from taking time off from work as Turning Point's Friday from 1.30, all day Saturday and Sunday.

    There appears to be politics regards the change in affiliation with Turning Point. Since DCU's own course has taken off, they opted not to continue in partnership with Turning Point. The fact that Turning Point could quickly get another well regarded Irish university to validate their programme shows how well regarded it is.

    However, DCU have to continue to accredit those like me who opted not to transfer over to UCC. This was primarily due to the fact that the 3 year exit point option (that I probably won't use) is no longer an option with UCC.

    PM if you need any more details.

    Sparkles14 wrote: »
    Hi All,

    This is the only thread I could find that starts to provide any information on the DCU Masters in Psychotherapy and the Turning Point Masters in Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy. Can anyone help in clarifying the differences? I know Gerry says above that they have different content and delivery methods but from their brochures both courses sound very similar and I'm really confused as to which one to go for. I have interviews for both and I don't want to make the wrong choice (if I get a choice that is). Any clarification would be a help! :)


    Has anyone done one of these courses or know anyone that has? They are both done over 4 years in part-time block segments. I know for the Turning Point course on top of the block weekends personal therapy, peer counselling and study groups are required each week, is it the same for the DCU course?
    Also which one has a better reputation, and does it matter when looking for a job? Does one of them have better placement connections than the other?

    I know the turning point course used to be affiliated with DCU but is now affiliated with UCC - are there politics involved there or is there a bigger picture I'm not seeing?

    Sorry for all the questions but my head is in a muddle over this and any help would be greatly appreciated!!!


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  • I am finished first year in Turning Point and love it. It is expensive (like all psychotherapy courses) and intensive but I have no regrets about choosing Turning Point.

    The reason I picked it over the DCU course was primarily that Turning Point appeared to be better regarded (both IAHIP and IACP). I see DCU are now IACP accredited - they weren't last year. Other than that I know little about the DCU course but assume by the time you are finished that it will be well established and well regarded too. Think DCU's weekends were all day Thursday, Friday and Saturday which didn't suit me as well from taking time off from work as Turning Point's Friday from 1.30, all day Saturday and Sunday.

    There appears to be politics regards the change in affiliation with Turning Point. Since DCU's own course has taken off, they opted not to continue in partnership with Turning Point. The fact that Turning Point could quickly get another well regarded Irish university to validate their programme shows how well regarded it is.

    However, DCU have to continue to accredit those like me who opted not to transfer over to UCC. This was primarily due to the fact that the 3 year exit point option (that I probably won't use) is no longer an option with UCC.

    PM if you need any more details.

    Good advice there Celbridge! Only thing is that if you actually want to do the Masters year, I think the UCC process is a lot better. The DCU ethics protocol is very convoluted & involves a LOT of unnecessary timewasting- I found it SO frustrating! Looks like UCC will be a lot more practical- maybe look into that side if you still have time? But if not, DCU is fine once you get through ethics. Oh and make sure they give you your student card in 4th year. I'm still waiting for mine :-)


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