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Counselling Course

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  • All of the psychotherapy courses are so expensive, between 3000-6000 euro a year. Does anyone know if there is any funding for one of these part-time courses?
    I am determind to do the course even if it cripples me but i would prefer if it didn't!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




  • namrod5000 wrote: »
    This post has been deleted.
    Hi, Sorry im new to this board and am not quite sure what im doing. I have just completed a BA in psychology and want to do the MSC in counselling next year. I was wondering what is the best thing for me to do now. At the moment im tutoring a child with aspergers syndrome and am waiting for an interview for the aware helpline. I was always told to look for a course that was psi accredited. Most of the foundation course I have looked at are not accredited. Does doing a foundation course make a big difference to the application for trinity. Or would I be better in trying to get a job that is related to counselling and if so has anybody got any ideas cus I can't find any that don't require a minumum of one years experience. Sorry about all the questions im really confused. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks




  • janete wrote: »
    Hi, Sorry im new to this board and am not quite sure what im doing. I have just completed a BA in psychology and want to do the MSC in counselling next year. I was wondering what is the best thing for me to do now. At the moment im tutoring a child with aspergers syndrome and am waiting for an interview for the aware helpline. I was always told to look for a course that was psi accredited. Most of the foundation course I have looked at are not accredited. Does doing a foundation course make a big difference to the application for trinity. Or would I be better in trying to get a job that is related to counselling and if so has anybody got any ideas cus I can't find any that don't require a minumum of one years experience. Sorry about all the questions im really confused. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


    Just my own opinion but if you already have a Psych BA I cannot see how a foundation level course would be of any use to you, and for Trinity I doubt that it would make a difference. Go straight to post-grad. As your body is the psi I would stick to that. More than likely you will end up having volunteer with some organisation try pick one that is in an area that you are interested in. Hope that helps a little, best of luck with it.




  • Beware, there are a lot of cowboy counselling courses out there (this info given to me by a relative who is a director of counselling in an IT) Ensure you will be registered with IACP on completion.


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  • I am currently doing a counselling skills course. I am so fustrated in what course to do next. I want a degree in counselling. Preferably down south of ireland. Is there any one who can help. also i want the best recognised qualification.
    Please help!!




  • Laurlolly, the course you want is in CIT Counselling and Psychotherapy, difficult to get a place on the course but the best qualification




  • DawnMc wrote: »
    Beware, there are a lot of cowboy counselling courses out there (this info given to me by a relative who is a director of counselling in an IT) Ensure you will be registered with IACP on completion.


    There is no course in Ireland where you will be registered with IACP on completion. You still have 450 hours of client work before you are fully accredited - it is more of a pre accredited system that works, that any decent course should have in place. You can always ring the IACP, and see if it is a course that they would recommend, if in doubt.




  • Just to say the are many professional bodies out that stand over our clinical work, yes some are better than others, but I just have to say that the IACP are not the only accrediting body and do not have specific rights over the terms counsellor or psychotherapist.




  • IACP are generally seen as the most reliable body.

    From what I've heard, CIT is the best recognised counselling and psychotherapy course in Munster


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  • It really depends on your orientation I have the most recent document about the regulation process and off the top of my head the must be at least 30 bodies involved I'll check it in the morning.




  • Hi there,

    I just found some more info's on selection criteria for the interviews of the B. A. Psychotherapy and Counselling:

    Demonstrated interest in and commitment to the subject
     Evidence of clear thinking and understanding
     Appropriateness of the course in relation to the candidate's declared interests
    and career aspirations
    Criteria include equal consideration of:
     Educational/ academic qualification
    Minimum academic criteria
    Literacy to Leaving Certificate level (or equivalent)
    Applicants must be able to demonstrate that they possess the necessary English
    Language proficiency level to succeed on the course.
     Experience – work or personal
     Personal competencies that include:
    The ability to think analytically,
    Level of self awareness,
    Interpersonal skills
    Communication skills,
    Attitude and maturity of character


    thought that might be of use for some of us!




  • Hi. I've just finished my fourth year of an honours degree with NCII in Limerick. They run the ONLY course in Ireland which is Fetac/Hetac accredited so they're government regulated. ICAP used to be the organisation the HSE etc looked to but ICAP are self-regulating so who regulates them?? I would much prefer to be with an organisation who are government regulated. NCII run part-time couses all over the country. The fees are tax deductable. Hope this helps




  • carol.c wrote: »
    Hi. I've just finished my fourth year of an honours degree with NCII in Limerick. They run the ONLY course in Ireland which is Fetac/Hetac accredited so they're government regulated. ICAP used to be the organisation the HSE etc looked to but ICAP are self-regulating so who regulates them?? I would much prefer to be with an organisation who are government regulated. NCII run part-time couses all over the country. The fees are tax deductable. Hope this helps


    I did the first year of the course in CIT, and that was HETAC accredited, and I believe DBS got the HETAC approval last year. The College I am with (PCI), are, I believe, looking into it.




  • carol.c wrote: »
    Hi. I've just finished my fourth year of an honours degree with NCII in Limerick. They run the ONLY course in Ireland which is Fetac/Hetac accredited so they're government regulated. ICAP used to be the organisation the HSE etc looked to but ICAP are self-regulating so who regulates them?? I would much prefer to be with an organisation who are government regulated. NCII run part-time couses all over the country. The fees are tax deductable. Hope this helps

    There are many therapist myself included that work in the HSE who are not members of the ICAP. If I wanted to join the IACP I would have to re-train despite having years of clinical work and a BA and MA.

    I think you may find that there are other psychotherapy courses accredited by Fetace/Hetac. My Diploma's are in my mothers but my MA which I recieve in 2002 was accredited by Fetac and my BA was by the same body but it went under a different name in 2000. IIRC the general psychotherapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy degrees and masters in DBS are accredited by Hetac and have been for a number of years.




  • Hi, I would like to give my views on this subject. I am currently in my second year of a four-year course with PCI College in Dublin. After starting other courses, and finding out by trial and error, this is the course which is perfect for me. I started the DBS course at one point, and it was too theoretical - not enough practicalities, and/or personal development. For me, PCI has a nice balance of personal development and/or skills alongside the theoretical modules. It is a very time consuming course, but I am very passionate about it, and know that after a long struggle of finding the right course, that this is the one for me.

    I think holding yourself back from opening up in interview can be to your detriment, because any skilled interviewer will sense that. I, myself, have been through some life changing experiences, which is why I am where I am now - however, I do think it is important to have your own boundaries on what is/is not appropriate to disclose. I have seen people who over disclose, in a sense of it nearly turning into their egos pushing themselves onto a pedestal, if that makes sense, that sometimes there can be an arrogance surrounding their motivation for doing the course.

    Check out www.pcicollege.ie

    They start an intensive foundation course in the new year. I honestly cannot fault them - however, like any course out there, they are not perfect, but is perfect for my needs.

    Best of luck Filan with pursuing your dreams ;)

    I agree with Mysticsoul. I have recently completed the diploma in counselling at PCI and enjoyed it immensely. It is time-consuming, but also very enjoyable at the same time. The course itself is a good mix of theoretical, experiential and a lot of skills training. I'm hoping to complete the Bsc in the next 10 months.

    I was also very fortunate to secure a job as a counsellor in the past couple of months and am due to start soon. Thankfully for me at least, the effort, hard work and time/financial committment has paid off!
    :)




  • I also did the Foundation Course in PCI and can highly recommend it. My Counsellor advised me as well, that the DBS course is not very good and the reputation either...
    I will start the bachelor program in PCI in SEptember and am very very excited, I was struggling to find the right course, but after examining and comparing a few courses, I found that this is the one, considering what you get for your money.
    I found a book about how to choose a Counselling/Psychotherapy training, which I found really helpful:
    Choosing a Counselling or Psychotherapy Training: A Practical Guide (Paperback)

    by Sylvie K. Schapira

    It provided me with key criteria for choosing an adequate training and under their criteria, PCI seems to be one of the best!




  • catussa wrote: »
    I also did the Foundation Course in PCI and can highly recommend it. My Counsellor advised me as well, that the DBS course is not very good and the reputation either...
    I will start the bachelor program in PCI in SEptember and am very very excited, I was struggling to find the right course, but after examining and comparing a few courses, I found that this is the one, considering what you get for your money.
    I found a book about how to choose a Counselling/Psychotherapy training, which I found really helpful:
    Choosing a Counselling or Psychotherapy Training: A Practical Guide (Paperback)

    by Sylvie K. Schapira

    It provided me with key criteria for choosing an adequate training and under their criteria, PCI seems to be one of the best!


    Hi there,

    Would you mind expanding on your post about DBS. Are you referring to the general psychotherapy or the psychoanalytic psychotherapy? I know alot of the lecturers are the same on both. I can tell that though psychoanalysis is very small in Ireland, their psan course are thought very highly of with Europe. Not having a go but I'm interested in how you formed that opinion.
    Cheers.




  • Odysseus wrote: »
    Hi there,

    Would you mind expanding on your post about DBS. Are you referring to the general psychotherapy or the psychoanalytic psychotherapy? I know alot of the lecturers are the same on both. I can tell that though psychoanalysis is very small in Ireland, their psan course are thought very highly of with Europe. Not having a go but I'm interested in how you formed that opinion.
    Cheers.

    When it comes to fee paying colleges, the only opinions you'll get are from people who haven't been and who don't know much about it.




  • Valmont wrote: »
    When it comes to fee paying colleges, the only opinions you'll get are from people who haven't been and who don't know much about it.

    Yeah I was thinking that myself:) However, I was hoping I was wrong [to be fair I may be] and that it was an informed opinion. I know the educational and clinical background of alot of the lecturers there, who additionally teach on the psychoanalytic programmes in Trinity and UCD.


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  • I was told that the number of students in one class in DBS is quiet high. correct me if I am wrong. That would be one big issue I would have with the course. Other than that I heard from current students that the school is a mess...which doesn't add any quality to it :D




  • catussa wrote: »
    I was told that the number of students in one class in DBS is quiet high. correct me if I am wrong. That would be one big issue I would have with the course. Other than that I heard from current students that the school is a mess...which doesn't add any quality to it :D

    I did the first year in DBS before moving to PCI, for many reasons. One being that it was as if they used the psychology modules as part of the psychotherapy course - was too academic for the type of course it is, whereas there needs to be a balance of the academia and the hands on experience, which I felt was lacking. The GAP group was an experience - the facilitator allowed people to talk about Coronation Street :eek:. Lack of communication all around - tutors and students didn't get the notice for a change in timetable once, and then due to this, four tutors turned up to take us at the same time :confused:. To be honest, if I were to seek therapy, I would not attend someone who had trained with DBS. One girl I know who didn't pass the interview to get into second year, appealed it by saying she didn't want to practice, but was their for her own development - quite scary to be honest - as in, by progressing through the course, the aim is to practice - if someone wanted to personal development, there are many groups around that would facilitate this :confused:




  • catussa wrote: »
    I was told that the number of students in one class in DBS is quiet high. correct me if I am wrong. That would be one big issue I would have with the course. Other than that I heard from current students that the school is a mess...which doesn't add any quality to it :D

    I have heard some things along those lines myself, but I studied there for five years and never encountered it. Though my Masters was a research one so if I wasn't working on my thesis I was attendind the classes in St Vincents Hosp.





  • was too academic for the type of course it is, whereas there needs to be a balance of the academia and the hands on experience, which I felt was lacking.

    The GAP group was an experience - the facilitator allowed people to talk about Coronation Street :eek:.




    To be honest, if I were to seek therapy, I would not attend someone who had trained with DBS.

    I have a lot of good things to say about where you are currently studying, but I personally feel that alot of the courses around today from what I hear are not academic enough for my thinking inanyway.

    That's group analysis for you, its about what the person was talking about when she was talking about Coronation St. The analyst isn't there to police the content, but to interpert it.

    Would your feeling on there therapists apply to all their courses? I ask that one out of interest.

    Cheers,




  • To be honest, if I were to seek therapy, I would not attend someone who had trained with DBS.

    I'm just going into fourth year of the course and it is quite disturbing to hear this sweeping generalisation being stated - so I'd like to respond to a number of your points.

    I would agree with you in terms of class size - however the large class sizes are only applicable for the academic "lecture" type ones. The skills classes are much, much smaller and get the full attention of the trainers.

    I would also agree with the general administration of the college being a joke, there were timetabling issues and issues with the rooms/facilities. It has improved somewhat this year.

    As for the "Coronation Street" incident.. as Odysseus mentioned, the point of the group facilitator is not to tell people what to talk about or stop them from discussing certain topics. It's all about speaking whats on your mind in the here and now - and sometimes, the "real" topics are veiled in discussions about something else. Talking about minutiae can also be a way for people to protect themselves from what's going on, avoidance if you will. You say you only did one year of the course so perhaps the whole point of the group hadn't sunk in for you at that point. I know it took me a while to grasp what the value of the group was for me. That is not a criticism of you btw :)
    In my opinion, I got so much out of my process group that I think it's a bad thing that the PCI course doesn't do a similar group. (to my knowledge)

    Regarding the incident with the person who was allowed into second year. In the DBS course, you do not do your clinical practice until third year. The first two years (certificate in social studies) are often completed by people who have an interest in the subject but don't necessarily want to practice - or sometimes the college will refuse entry to third year as this is where you begin clinical practice, so if you are deemed unsuitable for that work, it would be unethical to allow them to continue. I have known of people who were recommended not to continue into second year, but who wanted to complete the second year to get the certificate. These people did not move into third year or gain access to clients. So indeed, the girl may have been allowed into second year but that doesnt mean that she progressed any further or worked with real clients.

    I just felt I had to reply to this as I feel that some courses (DBS) get a bashing. It may tarnish the qualification I am working so hard towards in the eyes of people who believe everything they read on internet message boards.




  • I One girl I know who didn't pass the interview to get into second year, appealed it by saying she didn't want to practice, but was their for her own development - quite scary to be honest - as in, by progressing through the course, the aim is to practice - if someone wanted to personal development, there are many groups around that would facilitate this :confused:

    As an aside to this - I actually trained with a person in first year who were told they were not to continue on with the course as they were unsuitable for counselling work.

    This person deemed unsuitable (just like the girl you mentioned) then applied to PCI and carried on their studies there. :eek:

    So I guess theres good/bad aspects of all courses and their policies.




  • It was frustrating, as it seemed that every week, people would talk about Coronation Street, which was naturally an avoidance to talk about anything real. Major boundaries were broken too - people would discuss what others said on coffee breaks etc :eek:. The facilitator never talked about confidentiality, however some things, till then, I took as a given.

    I don't have the same feelings for all their courses - although I would answer that with a yes and no as well. Yes, due to the disorganisation of the administration there, however apart from that, I can only comment on my own experiences.

    I agree, some courses have too little coverage of the acadmic side of things - it is about balancing the academic side with the personal.




  • Talking on coffee breaks with stuuf like is always going to happen. It was a common thing when I facilitated groups even though it would be metion at the first seesion. We used to view that it was fine to talk about yourself but not what other people said. A few difficult thing to police and of course your only responsibilty in group work is wihin the group.

    Thanks for responding.




  • Just another point you should hear some of the content of some people when they free associate!!!


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  • Odysseus wrote: »
    Talking on coffee breaks with stuuf like is always going to happen. It was a common thing when I facilitated groups even though it would be metion at the first seesion. We used to view that it was fine to talk about yourself but not what other people said. A few difficult thing to police and of course your only responsibilty in group work is wihin the group.

    Thanks for responding.

    What used to be happen is stuff said in the smaller groups, would be said to people who were not there - kind of like chinese whispers, rather than in the way you mention above.


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