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Counselling Course

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    What used to be happen is stuff said in the smaller groups, would be said to people who were not there - kind of like chinese whispers, rather than in the way you mention above.

    I aggee with you that that type behaviour shouldn't happen I regularly facilitated groups from about 5 yrs and unfortunately that's what group members do.

    I would expect student's would try not to engage in this, but they are humans too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    Not having a go, but did you feel too uncomfortable to tackle the issue in group, as I said not having a go just interested.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,266 MysticalSoul


    Odysseus wrote: »
    Not having a go, but did you feel too uncomfortable to tackle the issue in group, as I said not having a go just interested.

    We did, time and time again, and the same people kept apologising, and then doing it again - boundaries is a bug bear of mine, or rather, lack thereof.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    It was frustrating, as it seemed that every week, people would talk about Coronation Street, which was naturally an avoidance to talk about anything real. Major boundaries were broken too - people would discuss what others said on coffee breaks etc :eek:. The facilitator never talked about confidentiality, however some things, till then, I took as a given.

    I don't have the same feelings for all their courses - although I would answer that with a yes and no as well. Yes, due to the disorganisation of the administration there, however apart from that, I can only comment on my own experiences.

    I agree, some courses have too little coverage of the acadmic side of things - it is about balancing the academic side with the personal.

    I agree all right about group being frustrating - especially at the start! I think as the group progresses though (in a lot of groups anyway) eventually people will start to voice their frustration and challenge it, which is a great source of learning for everyone. I think the coffee break thing is probably universal, though I never personally witnessed anything being said about anything/anyone in group to someone who was not a member.

    The unorganised fashion of how the course is run has been a bone of contention with the students since day one and we were constantly complaining in first and second year - though I can't say that this alone would make someone from that course a bad or good therapist. I reckon there's personal development to be had in learning how to deal with all the hassle :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus


    We did, time and time again, and the same people kept apologising, and then doing it again - boundaries is a bug bear of mine, or rather, lack thereof.

    Try working with active atticts, bounardies are next to extinct:)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 31 ✭✭✭ catussa


    Just to expand on the confidentiality issue: Our teacher puts a huge emphasis on the confidentiality issue and I think it makes a big difference! I cannot remember that people ever discussed what has been discussed in small groups - i think this is an important point of the training and an indicator of maturity...Especially because it is in the code of ethics should you ever apply for membership e. g. IACP


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    I don't think confidentiality is something that needs to be drummed into you by a teacher - common sense and working ethically means that you are obviously aware of the need of keeping the client's confidence, whether you apply to IACP or not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 31 ✭✭✭ catussa


    but it needs to be mentioned by a teacher since common sense is obviously missing in some students...:confused:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    Of course it needs to be mentioned, and indeed the importance of it emphasised and discussed. And I must point out that this, contrary to popular belief, DOES actually happen in DBS. But in my opinion, going into this sort of course, if you don't understand yourself about the importance of confidentiality with clients, there's something wrong there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 Science


    Hoping someone can give me some advice.. Im really interested in doing a counselling course, Unfortunatley Ive a science degree with no counselling experience at all. Is there anything I could do to improve my changes of getting a place?


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 headforthelight


    when i was looking for the right foundation course i was told that organisations like the IACP required a foundation course for a couple of reasons. the obvious reason is an academic foundation. but the real reason is the personal developement aspect. i was told that it was important to begin to put my own life into perspective. if you are truelly interested in becoming a counsellor then i would recommend a route that will give the best chance to develop as a person and a counsellor. this will make you a very effective counsellor. i assume that you are in the limerick area. i believe pci college offers a course there. i have friends that have gone to pci and have said thier foundation year was a great experience. i suspect that if you did the foundation year you would get a really good idea whether you want to be a counsellor or not. there are other degree courses in the limerick area if you do not want to be interviewed by the same guy as you did this time. best of luck


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    Science wrote: »
    Hoping someone can give me some advice.. Im really interested in doing a counselling course, Unfortunatley Ive a science degree with no counselling experience at all. Is there anything I could do to improve my changes of getting a place?

    Not all courses will insist that you have a foundation course to begin their counselling course - DBS for example didn't when I was starting, however there was an interview of professional suitability after the first year and continuous assessment of suitability throughout the course. I had no experience in the area whatsoever when beginning so don't let your lack of experience put you off applying, if that's what you want to do. Even the courses that prefer you to have done a foundation may take you on based on maturity/genuine interest in the area etc.

    Afoundation course such as the one mentioned by the last poster may certainly give you a better idea of what counselling is all about, and help you decide whether a longer course is for you. You know yourself best, so only you can say whether you need that year to decide.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 146 ✭✭ sachamama


    Science wrote: »
    Hoping someone can give me some advice.. Im really interested in doing a counselling course, Unfortunatley Ive a science degree with no counselling experience at all. Is there anything I could do to improve my changes of getting a place?

    if you are really interested in getting a place you could enroll for the introductory course, and perhaps do some voluntary work with Aware or the Samaritans (training is required for that)

    PCI are doing an introductory course over the summer, they condense the year course into a 3 month course, you could do that and see if you can enroll with them for their degree course to start this September, if you are very keen! Call them up and see if there are places still available.

    Ultimately it doesn't have anything to do with having a degree, science or otherwise. Its got everything to do with who you are, and why you want to do this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 695 ✭✭✭ SATSUMA


    Hi All,

    Just seeing what do you think of Tivoli Institute? I'm living in Galway so am a bit limited as to where to study. I was just thinking of firstly doing the foundation course and seeing how I feel about pursuing counselling further.


  • Registered Users Posts: 121 ✭✭ KEN.G


    Hi Guys,

    I’m really interested in starting a new career in counselling coming from and engineering background originally so I have no idea really of what to look for. I’m trying to pick a foundation course to give me an introduction to see if I’m cut out for it and then follow on with a degree.

    The course I have settled on is the 16 week part time NCII Certificate in Counselling Skills & Practice. Although this is a very expensive at 950 Euros you do get it back if you go on to do the HETEC Degree with NCII. Can anyone with more experience in this field think of a better route into counselling?

    Thanks in advance,

    Ken.


  • Registered Users Posts: 31 ✭✭✭ catussa


    HI Ken

    a foundation course is good to start off I guess, the price is also reasonable, I paid 500 quid more in PCI and it wasn't "refundable". Nevertheless it was worth each penny, I really enjoyed my foundation course and am now on the degree program in PCI.

    As of now you only need a diploma to become and accredited counsellor, but regulations might change soon so you are better off with a degree.
    Another route is through Psychology and then doing a postgrad in the counselling field, but that will take long and might be very expensive depending on the university :).

    Best of luck with the course, hope you are enjoying it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 ✭✭✭ carol.c


    Hi Ken. Good luck with your new career. Making the choice about what you want to do is half the work. I am currently in my fifth year of an honours degree with N.C.I.I. When I started the college was in its infancy so there was a lot of learning for both sides on the way. At this stage the college is absolutely brilliant. It's a great place to study because they are always there to give help and advice and really will do everything they can to make sure you succeed.
    I have really enjoyed the experience of learning more about myself apart from anything else but a word of warning - it's extremely hard to make money as a counsellor/psychotherapist especially in the current climate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    Ken, search more on this forum for threads on counselling, we have this discussion all the time. There's a thread another thread on the first page about it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 121 ✭✭ KEN.G


    catussa wrote: »
    HI Ken

    a foundation course is good to start off I guess, the price is also reasonable, I paid 500 quid more in PCI and it wasn't "refundable". Nevertheless it was worth each penny, I really enjoyed my foundation course and am now on the degree program in PCI.

    As of now you only need a diploma to become and accredited counsellor, but regulations might change soon so you are better off with a degree.
    Another route is through Psychology and then doing a postgrad in the counselling field, but that will take long and might be very expensive depending on the university :).

    Best of luck with the course, hope you are enjoying it.
    carol.c wrote: »
    Hi Ken. Good luck with your new career. Making the choice about what you want to do is half the work. I am currently in my fifth year of an honours degree with N.C.I.I. When I started the college was in its infancy so there was a lot of learning for both sides on the way. At this stage the college is absolutely brilliant. It's a great place to study because they are always there to give help and advice and really will do everything they can to make sure you succeed.
    I have really enjoyed the experience of learning more about myself apart from anything else but a word of warning - it's extremely hard to make money as a counsellor/psychotherapist especially in the current climate.

    Thanks for the advice guys and good to hear a good report from a NCII student.
    hotspur wrote: »
    Ken, search more on this forum for threads on counselling, we have this discussion all the time. There's a thread another thread on the first page about it.

    Thanks hotspur looks like there’s a heavy debate going on in another thread over which institute to go for - IACP, IAPP, NCII. TBH I'm even more confused now than when I started :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4 cuffem


    Hi there

    I am in my 3rd year of studying counselling. after completing a cert in nui maynooth i then went on to DBS to start my degree in counselling and psychotherapy. I absolutely love some of the classes but felt that it was too academically minded with not enough practical experience to balance it out. in addition to this DBS are the biggest disaster to deal with. this is a huge shame as they have ultimately pushed me so far that i am now in the process of trying to leave midway through the year and complete my training in NCII. Its really really sad as i have many friends in the class and cannot fault the lecturers who are lovely but the DBS administration is a nightmare to deal with. constant changes, additional subjects being added to the curric 2 years in without consultation, changing and merging therapy groups and telling us to sort it out and when we protest the words 'deal with it' are uttered. then when you say we are paying 5k to receive poor treatment your told 'thats not condusive to the conversation and it will be terminated if you dont drop your tone or content!'. awfull stuff
    anywho taking my previous rant out :rolleyes: i was looking for some feedback on NCII? anyone any points advice etc?

    thanks


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    cuffem wrote: »
    Hi there

    I am in my 3rd year of studying counselling. after completing a cert in nui maynooth i then went on to DBS to start my degree in counselling and psychotherapy. I absolutely love some of the classes but felt that it was too academically minded with not enough practical experience to balance it out. in addition to this DBS are the biggest disaster to deal with. this is a huge shame as they have ultimately pushed me so far that i am now in the process of trying to leave midway through the year and complete my training in NCII. Its really really sad as i have many friends in the class and cannot fault the lecturers who are lovely but the DBS administration is a nightmare to deal with. constant changes, additional subjects being added to the curric 2 years in without consultation, changing and merging therapy groups and telling us to sort it out and when we protest the words 'deal with it' are uttered. then when you say we are paying 5k to receive poor treatment your told 'thats not condusive to the conversation and it will be terminated if you dont drop your tone or content!'. awfull stuff
    anywho taking my previous rant out :rolleyes: i was looking for some feedback on NCII? anyone any points advice etc?

    thanks

    What year are you in? Would you not just stick out the year having paid for it, there's only another two months realistically, and it would mean you mightn't have to repeat whatever year you are in now in your new college.

    I can feel your pain about DBS's organisational skills but I must say as bad as the administration side is, it's improved tenfold this year (I am in the fourth year). It was atrocious up until then. They have changed the course this year also but in my opinion it makes things a bit more streamlined and makes more sense. Its funny, I often hear people saying (usually on here) that the DBS course is too academic but I personally genuinely think it's an important part.

    I have no real knowledge about NCII, there was a discussion here about it a while ago if you have a search on it. Just make sure it is accredited before wasting your time and money on it.

    Good luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,754 Odysseus



    Its funny, I often hear people saying (usually on here) that the DBS course is too academic but I personally genuinely think it's an important part.


    Personally I think it's fundamental, you can pick up the clinical side in your work with clients and this will be ongoing for the rest of your working life. In order to go on to a Masters or PhD programme people are going to need a good academic background. I really believe the emphasis some places put on experiential learning does our profession no favours.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,327 ✭✭✭ hotspur


    Hey look yet another 1st time poster wanting to talk about the merits of NCII. Remarkable how frequently that happens.


  • Registered Users Posts: 361 ✭✭ sadie9


    I did a foundation with NCII but I wouldn't do a degree with them. They talk a good talk though.
    For starters it's very easy to get on their courses. All you have to do it pay the money! No interview or nothing. Any other reputable course has an interview process presumably to screen out unsuitable candidates or those doing the course for the wrong reasons.
    And they accept school leavers on their fulltime course whereas other courses you have to be over 25 to apply.
    Also they are not accredited by the IACP.

    If you are thinking of doing a Degree in Counselling ask yourself these questions:
    Do I want to do this because I like the personal development side, and classroom interaction and the close connection with my classmates, and would like to continue this? Could this need be fulfilled some other way.
    If I want to become a Counsellor then why am I not doing some counselling work at the minute (eg. volunteering with Samaritan's or Childline) or other volunteer work. Is it because I'm not trained or I don't feel ready or do I just not fancy it at the moment.
    I was seriously thinking of doing a counselling degree but the more I explore it the more I am questioning my motives. And it's an expensive hobby if it comes to nothing more than a personal develoment exercise...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17 ✭✭✭ Sofa so good


    It seems there are too many people out there looking for a quick route into a career as a counsellor...

    I am also surprised at the lack of desire for academic knowledge, do people just expect to practice their way into being an efficient and competent counsellor?....I would query the capablity of these people to become effective counsellors if they don't expect to have a deep understanding of the theoretical aspects of counselling, or how to keep up to date with research into the efficacy of various approaches to specific problems.

    Counselling is not a career to be entering on a whim. It scares me to think that there are so many courses out there, I hope the public are aware of the difference between a weekend warrior and someone who has spent years studying to become the best counsellor that their abilities allow.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19 ✭✭✭ thierrym


    Hi, I am into my 3rd year of a 4 year part-time degree in "counselling and addiction studies" with the N.C.I.I. I am loving the course and the lecturers are top notch. I have heard criticism about the N.C.I.I degrees such as "too theoretical, not enough practical". I tend to agree a small bit with this, though i am getting a lot of knowledge through this course. During this year (3rd), as part of the course I have to do 55 hours of shadowing and next year I will have to complete 110 hours of practical work experience. I beleive the N.C.I.I degree course is the only course that is HETAC accredited (i could be wrong). I would recommend this course to anybody who wishes to study this subject. The N.C.I.I runs courses on general counselling, addiction studies and youth studies. If anyone wishes to ask me about what i know about the N.C.I.I, feel free to ask.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    thierrym wrote: »
    I beleive the N.C.I.I degree course is the only course that is HETAC accredited (i could be wrong).

    DBS is Hetac also and I think PCI may be, or may be in the process of being accredited with them

    However, as has been stated time and time again on this forum, hetac accreditation is not of any particular use for gaining accreditation so the fact NCII is Hetac accredited is of as much relevance to furthering your career in the field of psychotherapy as a pair of old socks.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1 joaney79


    Hi,

    Please help me I am at my wits end trying to find a voluntary counselling placement in Dublin I have rang and emailed many organisations to no avail. They are either full or do not offer placements.

    I would appreciate if you knew any places that are accepting trainees. No one seems to be able to help even my tutors. I cant believe it is this hard to find somewhere.

    Thanks,


  • Registered Users Posts: 19 ✭✭✭ thierrym


    Dear Joaney79, May I ask what course you are doing and if it is a shadowing placement or a work experience placement that you are looking for. As I said on this post earlier, I am in 3rd year of a counselling degree with the N.C.I.I.
    During the course of this year I had to complete a 55 hours shadowing placement, The college said to the students that taking up voluntary work with Childline would be OK for our shadowing placement. I therefore replied to an ad in my local paper stating that Childline was looking for volunteers. I was accepted with Childline. Prior to starting work on the phonelines, Childline gives serious training consisting of 13 training sessions of 3 hours each, and once your garda clearance comes back clear you can then start work. I have loved the Childline phonelines work. Childline asks that you commit to 1 shift/week of 4 hours each. I have hugely benefited from this placement as regards "listening skills" as well as the other skills i had been taught on my course. Childline is regularly looking for volunteers.
    I hope this helps.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,518 krankykitty


    Hi Joaney

    What course are you doing? Is there someone in the college looking after the placements? In my course even though there is a placement officer it took an awfully long time and a lot of effort to find a suitable placement.

    Are you at the start of clinical practice at the moment or have you any experience? I remember when I started looking around, a lot of places were unwilling to take you on without any hours, however that leaves you in a catch 22 situation as how can you get experience without getting a chance... Eventually everyone in the course got sorted out so it was just a case of persevering with the search.. as frustrating as that is.

    Most of the low cost/community centres will take trainees, a web search might give you some ideas. Also some therapists will take on trainees who they will refer people who come to their practice looking for low cost counselling, and will hopefully do an assessment for you. Some of the students on my course spoke to local GPs and got clients referred from them. You could look into finding a room to rent by the hour or a few hour block to do this. That might be an option?

    This time of year is probably a good time to be looking as people finishing their courses might be also finishing up their placements..

    Just so you are aware, phone based helplines such as Childline would not have been considered as hours in our clinical practice. You know yourself what you're after anyway :)

    Best of luck..


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