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Counselling Course

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  • Had a quick look at that site, why would a profession body need my PPS number, closed the page after seeing that. Most bodies require CPD.




  • Sorry I was talking about psychotherapy bodies not psychology. Once again look at link removed and you will see what is possible in a counselling and psychotherapy professional bod . No matter what you think about it you will have to agree it is a huge leap forward for our profession.

    I don't want to see you posting a link to your website again. The next time you do, you'll be banned from the sci category, permanently.

    fact.




  • ....so rather been accused of shrilling let me openly state a few facts,...

    What a beautiful example of a Freudian slip...:p




  • I'm just finishing a conversion course in psychology and want to get some general experience in the area before starting a Masters next year. Would the course in counselling from NUI Galway be any use from that perspective?

    I don't want to pursue counselling, but I've heard that doing a general counselling couse is useful when applying for other courses (eg Ed. Psych). Are there better courses than this one in Galway? I'm eager to be able to get references from NUI Galway, as although my conversion course is accredited, I'd prefer to have some additional qualifications (albeit not accredited ones) from a more established university.

    This course is a certificate (which can develop to diploma level) which is only accredited by NUI Galway. I only want the course to bulk up my CV really. Would I be wasting my time? Thanks in advance, ye are always very helpful here :)

    http://www.nuigalway.ie/adulteducation/programmes/psychology_counselling.html

    I've also looked at the NUI Certificate in Counselling Skills offered through NUI Maynooth in GMIT (Galway)
    http://www.gmit.ie/lifelong-learning/lifelong-learning-programmes/accredited/humanities/nui-certificate-in-counselling-skills.html

    and this one which has been recommended on this thread. Unfortunately, as all of the classes for this one are held at weekends, I think I'd prefer one of the other options.
    http://www.galwaycounselling.com/foundation.html

    To be honest, after reading this thread I'm leaning more towards the NUI Certificate in Counselling Skills offered through NUI Maynooth - the only reason I'm interested in the one being offered by NUI Galway is because I thought I might get to know people in the psychology department there.




  • Hello all,

    I've just finished a 4 years part time course in counselling at the NCII. Enjoyed the course, there were ups and downs, pros and cons but to cut a long story short I made it till the end and got my degree done.

    Now I have a big problem, which is called accreditation. IACP seems to be one of the most important accreditation body in Ireland but NCII said they are not accredited by IACP.
    IACP said that NCII is not on their list, but if I'm convinced NCII meets their criteria I may send my application form through and wait for their answer.

    I've been suggested to join APCP. I can see HSE, VHI and so on putting their logos on the APCP website, but still not sure what to do.

    I know I could ask all these questions to my supervisor, but he's on holiday at the moment, so bare with me :D

    I've already read all the closed thread, banned people, everything else about whether ncii is good or not. This is not what I'm asking for. What I would like to know is whether I can join any other accredited body as IACP, which are nationally recognised.

    Thanks in advance.


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  • Odysseus wrote: »
    Had a quick look at that site, why would a profession body need my PPS number, closed the page after seeing that. Most bodies require CPD.

    What's CPD?




  • CPD is continuous professional development

    I think you should be okay with IACP - best contact them directly. The NCII course will have been designed to maximise professional acceptance.

    I've given up trying to work out why the representatives of APCP consider that their 'hard sell' would endear them to practising and prospective therapists and counsellors reading these forums. To me it's behaviour completely out of step with the profession. Without the behaviour on here I would have probably been quite open to a free professional organisation. Anyway - it's up to each of us to decide where we go and seeing as I'm on an IAHIP aligned course and that IAHIP are fairly much aligned with my own view of the profession then I'll probably stay with them.




  • Thanks stuf,
    I hope IACP will accept my request.
    Are you all counsellors or psychotherapist here? I'm planning to attend a Master in drama therapy in Maynooth. I've only heard good stuff about them. Fees are very high though.




  • Hello there. I'm new to this forum but have been following the different threads about the various accrediating bodies in Ireland. I find it disturbing to read the various aggressive posts being put up from people representing NCII. I did some research on this APCP and basically it is being headed by the same people who are the chairperson and dean of studies of NCII. Personally I don't feel that it is ethical that a college can branch off and start up their own accrediting body. This goes against fairness, justice and professional transparency. I hold the European Certificate of Psychotherapy and for me this should be (and hopefully will be with statuatory regaulation) the standard for anybody to call themselves a 'psychotherapist'. For those people from NCII defending themselves on this forum-could you please look at this standards and let me know if your course meets the criteria of ECP? BTW I know that answer already.




  • BTW 'always me' I previously checked with IACP and they told me that no graduates of NCII had been accredited by them to date. I did this as they were offering me a lecturing post with 'no interview' and asking me to 'teach' psychotherapeutic interventions to masters students. These masters students had no previous background in personal development or process work and also their 200 hours of placement work weren't being supervised by the college. I declined the offer on an ethical basis.


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  • Thanks for your answers airyfaery.

    Today I've been made aware that there are 22 Counselling Professional Bodies in Ireland.
    I mean. 22.
    That's a long list. Saying I was shocked is an euphemism.

    In my own country, we have one Counselling Professional Body only. ONE, which is nationally ruled. To become a counsellor or a psychotherapist you need to go to a nationally recognized college. Afterwards you have 2 more years of supervised work experience to do. When you finish your 2 years, you have to pass an exam to be registred in the National Board of Psychotherapist. When you get in that list, you have another 4 years of a Specialistic School to do.

    Only at the end you may call yourself a counsellor or psychotherapist.

    Here this doesn't happen. No wonder why people from different backgrounds throw tantrum at eachother.




  • alwaysme wrote: »
    In my own country, we have one Counselling Professional Body only. ONE, which is nationally ruled.

    That's why Statutory Regulation is coming here - eventually. It takes time. At the moment I think Social Workers are being registered.

    At the moment, nurses and doctors are the only professions which are statutorily regulated.




  • That's why Statutory Regulation is coming here - eventually.

    where can i keep an eye on how this is progressing?

    also can you tell me how regulated the Hypnotherapy & Psychotherapy sector is. Sorry i know this is not counselling per se.

    If you had to explain to a real greenhorn the differences and the preference of Counselling v's psychotherapy what would they be.

    I am interested in getting into counselling of some description.




  • kiwikid wrote: »
    where can i keep an eye on how this is progressing?

    I wish I knew! What we know is posted in the Sticky Thread, above, called Statutory Registration.

    Counselling & Psychotherapy will be regarded as one, I think.

    Have a look at the sticky.




  • kiwikid wrote: »
    where can i keep an eye on how this is progressing?

    also can you tell me how regulated the Hypnotherapy & Psychotherapy sector is. Sorry i know this is not counselling per se.

    If you had to explain to a real greenhorn the differences and the preference of Counselling v's psychotherapy what would they be.

    I am interested in getting into counselling of some description.

    Hypnotherapy is voluntarily regulated like psychotherapy i.e. no statutory regulation.

    The semantic differences between counselling and psychotherapy has narrowed in recent years, but traditionally counselling was considered work on everyday problems which had less depth to it and its practitioners commonly less training.

    The proposed statutory regulations would subsume both under the protected title of psychological therapist but would also retain the distinction between the 2 with different training criteria being applied to them.

    Why not try a foundation course in counselling and psychotherapy?




  • i suppose the reason that i would not do the foundation is that it is not accredited and costs a fair bit. Although the diploma costs more its accredited.

    I am very interested in counselling - not for addictions, just everyday issues that effect people.




  • kiwikid wrote: »
    i suppose the reason that i would not do the foundation is that it is not accredited and costs a fair bit. Although the diploma costs more its accredited.

    I am very interested in counselling - not for addictions, just everyday issues that effect people.

    One ordinarily cannot get onto a diploma course without a foundation course.




  • hotspur wrote: »
    One ordinarily cannot get onto a diploma course without a foundation course.

    If indeed it is possible would you suggest one is at a disadvantage if they do not have the cert or foundation course done?




  • hotspur wrote: »
    One ordinarily cannot get onto a diploma course without a foundation course.

    Not necessarily true - postgrad diplomas at DBS and other places are open to anyone with a bachelors degree in any discipline. The serve as an honours degree level (HETAC level 8) conversion course and prepare you for a clinical masters.




  • kiwikid wrote: »
    If indeed it is possible would you suggest one is at a disadvantage if they do not have the cert or foundation course done?

    I would imagine it depends on the course's specific requirements - I know of one course (DBS) which did not require a foundation course, whereas I believe other courses such as PCI do like you to have one. Perhaps the admissions office in the diploma/degree course you are looking at might be able to advise you.

    I suppose the benefits of doing the foundation is more related to you being sure that it's the road you want to take before embarking on a longer course, as you'll find out more about what exactly is involved in the course, the personal development requirements and the career itself.

    It could help you decide if you're not sure.. though it can be quite an expensive way to research it, if it's not a requirement!


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  • im in Cork looking at the counselling centre courses,
    Foundation - 1600e and diploma a whopping 3,600pa for 2 years part time. I know the latter is worth the money i just agree i don;t know if its worth it to me as in if it is something i would like to do at the end.:confused:




  • Think you need to find out as much as you can about the course and the career itself so - any specific questions? I (and many on here) would be more than happy to answer them if we can. I'm personally not familiar with the details of the specific course you mention though.

    It is a big commitment and although I'm not sure any amount of information can prepare you, at least it might give an idea about whether you want to do it or not. Maybe the foundation would help with that too.




  • ok so - i had had some hypnotherapy before and found it good and thought no more about it. Then a life change occurred where i needed counselling and perhaps to change careers. Then i thought the counselling is more "me" than the hypnotherapy, although i do like both. The hundred and one different "accredited bodies" has me completely bamboozled! I don't want to do a course and find it will not be approved. I do not want to be a life coach, but to help those who find the "standard" life challenges; grief, marraige, illness, occupational stress, loneliness etc rather than those with addiction or sexual / domestic abuse issues for example as i think they are beyond a 2 year part time course to be honest and I am not willing to get into a full time degree. Sorry if i offend anyone with my opinion. So this is really why i don't have well formulated questions as you suggest - but i hope you can advise nonetheless :)




  • You're very wise to consider the limitations of a two year course and that's really admirable.

    However, you may find it's very difficult to limit yourself to "standard" types of issues -for example, a client may turn up initially wanting to discuss say a problem with their job, but as the work progresses it may emerge there are more serious issues at play. You've built a working relationship with this person, so what do you do when they bring up these issues? You can't really predict what people will come in with, and whether other issues won't be raised.

    Why do you feel reluctant about the "non standard" issues (you don't have to answer this here of course!) - is it simply because you don't feel you'd be prepared by the two year course, or is there something else that makes you feel reluctant? Perhaps some form of life coaching or perhaps brief solution focused therapy might be able to offer you what you're looking for?

    I did a four year course and to be honest, I don't think you ever feel "prepared" as such until you're in the chair and gaining experience so to speak.

    Remember as well with the four year courses, you'd usually begin actually working with clients after two years...

    The accrediting body gets everyone bamboozled all right :)




  • You're very wise to consider the limitations of a two year course and that's really admirable.

    However, you may find it's very difficult to limit yourself to "standard" types of issues -for example, a client may turn up initially wanting to discuss say a problem with their job, but as the work progresses it may emerge there are more serious issues at play. You've built a working relationship with this person, so what do you do when they bring up these issues? You can't really predict what people will come in with, and whether other issues won't be raised.

    Why do you feel reluctant about the "non standard" issues (you don't have to answer this here of course!) - is it simply because you don't feel you'd be prepared by the two year course, or is there something else that makes you feel reluctant? Perhaps some form of life coaching or perhaps brief solution focused therapy might be able to offer you what you're looking for?

    I did a four year course and to be honest, I don't think you ever feel "prepared" as such until you're in the chair and gaining experience so to speak.

    Not so much wise mroe realistic?

    Why do i feel reluctant - perhaps its because i have no knowledge or experience of these myself and no training of what it takes to counsel these issues. Maybe its also because i would be afraid of causing more harm if i did a poor job?




  • As you would be if you went ahead and did it now with no training - but that's the purpose of the courses, to prepare you and educate you for it (and hopefully, if the course is any good, to let you know if they think you're not suitable for that kind of work)




  • Kiwikid the whole point of foundation courses in counselling and psychotherapy is for people in your exact situation to get exposed to the area and be well placed to make an informed judgement about yourself and psychotherapy.

    Unfortunately the price of these courses seems to have crept up in the last couple of years to the point where many would want to be fairly sure of wanting to enter it as a career path before committing that kind of money.

    This is a shame and, I believe, is functioning contrary to the point of the courses in the first place.

    Judging by what you have written here I would find it difficult to recommend that you shell out for a diploma in counselling as you appear to be at a very preliminary stage in your understanding of it and whether you think it's right for you. In any case the counselling centre course requires a foundation course.

    I don't know of any cheaper foundation courses in Cork, CIT and PCI do ones there but Cit deadline has been missed and is more expensive, PCI is a little cheaper at €1450.




  • Has anyone completed the Postgraduate Higher Diploma in Counselling & Psychotherapy in DBS?

    I've a degree in Communications and am considering this course.




  • silvine wrote: »
    Has anyone completed the Postgraduate Higher Diploma in Counselling & Psychotherapy in DBS?

    I've a degree in Communications and am considering this course.

    I have. Some of the lecturing was pretty awful but the worst of the lecturers have been replaced to the best of my knowledge.

    On the skills side, I don't think I could have received a better education.

    Course content has a good balance and has certainly left me confident of moving on to a clinical MA - unfortunately I have to defer for a year due to lack of funds.

    feel free to PM me with any questions you'd rather not air publicly

    EDIT: BTW, My initial education is as a physicist and I work in the software industry so don't worry about your background.


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  • Thanks for that Stuf, I sent you a PM with one or two questions. I hope you don't mind.


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