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28-04-2013, 22:35   #46
 
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I must be missing something basic but here's my question anyway.

I'm looking for the noun 'upheaval'. I got 'suaitheadh' in Focal.ie. In Ó Dónaill. suaitheadh has m. next to it so I presume it is both a noun and masculine. However, neither Ó Dónaill nor Focal.ie give its plural: both only give 'suaite', its genitive singular.

Here's my problem: I want to say "a lot of upheavals" and I know that after "a lán", "mórán" etc the noun changes into the genitive (gen. plural in this case) if the noun is lagiolra, e.g. 'a lán airgid'. It apparently does not change if the noun is treániolra, e.g. a lán fadhbanna. Given the above limitations, how do I work out whether the noun is lagiolra and what its genitive plural case is?


If I said "mórán suaite" would that mean "a lot of upheaval"?
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28-04-2013, 22:38   #47
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I'd say you'd be better off leaving it in the singular. I've never heard "upheavals" used in the plural before. Maybe "periods of upheaval" would be better.
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29-04-2013, 14:25   #48
An gal gréine
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I dont think 'suaitheadh' is used as a noun so would 'clampar/clampair' do the job? Along with upheaval it can also mean wrangle or commotion.
Círéib/círéibeacha might be too strong as it's most common meaning is 'riot/s' but then it depends on the nature of your upheaval.
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11-05-2013, 18:42   #49
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Dia dhaoibh,

Tá ceist agam faoi gramadach. B'fhéidir go bhfuil sé simplí daoibh, ach táimse beagánín trína céile...
Ba mhaith liom a rá:
"Ba mhór againn bhur mbronntanas flaithiúil."

My problem:
Does the phrase "ba mhór againn..." take the Tuisil Ginideach?

So should it be:
"Ba mhór againn bhur mbronntanais flaithiúil"
ie bronntanas -> bronntanais in TG?

If so, would the Tuisil Ginideach also therefore extend to the adjective "flaithiúil", and if it does would the Tuisil Ginideach of flaithiúil be flaithiúila?

Tá sé beagnach fiche bhliain ó bhí me i scoil, so I've forgotten the intricies of the language, but always trying to learn!!

Go raibh maith agaibh
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11-05-2013, 20:23   #50
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Dia dhaoibh,

Tá ceist agam faoi gramadach. B'fhéidir go bhfuil sé simplí daoibh, ach táimse beagánín trína céile...
Ba mhaith liom a rá:
"Ba mhór againn bhur mbronntanas flaithiúil."

My problem:
Does the phrase "ba mhór againn..." take the Tuisil Ginideach?
No, it doesn't take an tuiseal ginideach.
But I was wondering one thing: why do you say "ba mhór" - would it not be more natural to say "is mór"? Of course if the bronntanas is now briste, caite amach or whatever, "ba mhór" would make sense. But if it's still good, I'd go for "is mór"

For grammar questions, go to this site:
http://193.1.97.44/focloir/
Put in the word e.g. flaithiúil
And it gives you the various forms, which I have copied below.
Is suiomh thar a bheith úsáideach é!!!
flaithiúil - aidiacht
flaithiúil[ainmneach uatha ]
flaithiúil[ginideach firinscneach ]
flaithiúla[ginideach baininscneach ]
flaithiúla[ainmneach iolra / ginideach tréaniolra]
flaithiúil[ginideach iolra lag]
flaithiúla[breischéim ]
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11-05-2013, 20:25   #51
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I disagree. You can be referring to how you felt at that time. Ba mhór is fine in that case.
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20-05-2013, 15:43   #52
 
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Rinne me measúnú gramadaí.

I don't want to write a wall of text so I'll just ask about the simpler ones I got wrong for now.

OK, so:


Question 10: Cén post atá agat? __________

Is múinteoir mé.
Tá mé múinteoir.
I siopa.
Ní hea.

I chose the right one (Is múinteoir mé), but I don't understand why "tá mé múinteoir" wasn't acceptable. Is múinteoir mé just sounds better to my ear. It sounds more straightforward, like you're identifying something. It doesn't FEEL like "Tá mé" should be attributed to a noun. Something like that. But I don't really know what's wrong with it.


Question 11: An post lánaimseartha é? __________

Tá sé.
Is ea.
Níl sé.
Bíonn.

Why is it "is ea"? I chose "Tá sé".


Question 16: An __________ deirfiúr Shorcha?

ortsa
agat
tusa
bhfuil tú

I chose "an bhfuil tú", but it's tusa. "An tusa deirfiúr Shorcha?" sounds like "yourself is Sorcha's sister" to me though, rather than "Are you" her sister. How come it's tusa? I'll leave the other 47 questions I got wrong for later
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20-05-2013, 16:28   #53
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The last two, and "tá mé múinteoir" are all classic "TSF" mistakes, that is, "Tá sé fear" mistakes, as opposed to the correct "is fear é".

I grabbed this explanation from another site, i don't have a "go-to" technical explanation for the TSF mistake:

‘Tá’ is used with adjectives to express a state or condition; it is not used (on its own) for classification or identification sentences, i.e., it can’t be used to answer the question ‘what is he/it?’. For these structures you use ‘is’
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20-05-2013, 17:40   #54
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It's also worth remembering that translations between different language families are rarely 100% like-for-like.

Syntax and idiom and verb conjugations aren't always going to translate cleanly. You can't just apply English grammar rules to Gaeilge.
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20-05-2013, 17:45   #55
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Originally Posted by Insect Overlord View Post
It's also worth remembering that translations between different language families are rarely 100% like-for-like.

Syntax and idiom and verb conjugations aren't always going to translate cleanly. You can't just apply English grammar rules to Gaeilge.
Always worth noting!
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20-05-2013, 22:35   #56
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Originally Posted by MaryKirwan View Post
Question 10: Cén post atá agat? __________

Is múinteoir mé.
Tá mé múinteoir.
I siopa.
Ní hea.

I chose the right one (Is múinteoir mé), but I don't understand why "tá mé múinteoir" wasn't acceptable. Is múinteoir mé just sounds better to my ear. It sounds more straightforward, like you're identifying something. It doesn't FEEL like "Tá mé" should be attributed to a noun. Something like that. But I don't really know what's wrong with it.
As someone has already said the rule is this:
Is + noun
Tá mé/tú + adjective

Quote:
Question 11: An post lánaimseartha é? __________

Tá sé.
Is ea.
Níl sé.
Bíonn.

Why is it "is ea"? I chose "Tá sé".


Question 16: An __________ deirfiúr Shorcha?

ortsa
agat
tusa
bhfuil tú

I chose "an bhfuil tú", but it's tusa. "An tusa deirfiúr Shorcha?" sounds like "yourself is Sorcha's sister" to me though, rather than "Are you" her sister. How come it's tusa? I'll leave the other 47 questions I got wrong for later
These two questions are really the same:
an in both cases is the verb, it is the interrogative forms of the verb is, an chopail.
The long answer in q.11 is
Is post lánaimseartha é
To save repetition, you say
Is ea.

In q.16, an again is the verb, the question or interrogative form. So if you say "an bhfuil" you now have two verbs; and yes, out of context this is very confusing because in a different context "an bhfuil" is a good construction.
But remember that you didn't say
Tá mé múinteoir so you're not going to say
An bhfuil tú múinteoir either.
You wouldn't say
Tá tú deirfiúr so you won't say
An bhfuil tú deirfiúr

So you have
is mé - is mise - is múinteoir mé
is tú - is tusa - is tusa deirfiúr Shorcha
and alsoto make a question,
an mé - an mise - an múinteoir mé?
an tú - an tusa - an tusa deirfiúr Shorcha?
etc.
I hope that's of some help!
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21-05-2013, 20:41   #57
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deirdremf View Post
As someone has already said the rule is this:
Is + noun
Tá mé/tú + adjective

These two questions are really the same:
an in both cases is the verb, it is the interrogative forms of the verb is, an chopail.
The long answer in q.11 is
Is post lánaimseartha é
To save repetition, you say
Is ea.

In q.16, an again is the verb, the question or interrogative form. So if you say "an bhfuil" you now have two verbs; and yes, out of context this is very confusing because in a different context "an bhfuil" is a good construction.
But remember that you didn't say
Tá mé múinteoir so you're not going to say
An bhfuil tú múinteoir either.
You wouldn't say
Tá tú deirfiúr so you won't say
An bhfuil tú deirfiúr

So you have
is mé - is mise - is múinteoir mé
is tú - is tusa - is tusa deirfiúr Shorcha
and alsoto make a question,
an mé - an mise - an múinteoir mé?
an tú - an tusa - an tusa deirfiúr Shorcha?
etc.
I hope that's of some help!
So does that mean if you were asking someone if they were a teacher you'd say "An tusa múinteoir?"?! I've been using "an bhfuil..." for everything

I don't really get it, but eventually I will. I'll at least identify it next time. I'll read it another few times and try to understand it a bit better. It's mostly just that I don't understand why "an bhfuil"= two verbs in this context. Is it because you're identifying something, so if you were answering you'd be saying "is mise", so here you need the corresponding "tusa"? I half understand.
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21-05-2013, 21:17   #58
 
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OK :3

Cúpla níos mó ceisteanna faoin measúnú, má ní miste libh.

Ceist 7:


Question 7: Féachaim __________ an teilifís.

ag
as
leis
ar

Cén fáth "ar" an teilifís seachas (rather than?) "ag". As béarla, you look AT TV, not on it. I know these things don't translate the same way. I'm just wondering if there's a particular explanation.


Question 31: Tá sé ina chónaí ar imeall __________.

na cathrach
an baile
an cathair
chathair

Roghnaigh (I chose?) mé "an cathair" ach tá sé (or is ea??? ) "na cathrach". Cén fáth ;_; Níl tuigim sin ar bith.


Question 35: Cé mhéad seomra leapa atá sa teach? __________

Ceathair.
Trí cinn.
Triúr.
Dhá.

Dúirt mé "Ceathair", tá sé/is ea "trí cinn". What's a cinn :O? It says "advanced" when I look it up.
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21-05-2013, 21:38   #59
deirdremf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryKirwan View Post
So does that mean if you were asking someone if they were a teacher you'd say "An tusa múinteoir?"?! I've been using "an bhfuil..." for everything
You could say that, but most people in this context would put "tusa" at the end: An múinteoir tusa? Please don't ask me to explain, other than to say if you put tusa earlier in the sentence, you are stressing it.
Quote:
I don't really get it, but eventually I will. I'll at least identify it next time. I'll read it another few times and try to understand it a bit better. It's mostly just that I don't understand why "an bhfuil"= two verbs in this context. Is it because you're identifying something, so if you were answering you'd be saying "is mise", so here you need the corresponding "tusa"? I half understand.
The verb is has 4 forms in the present tense:
is - affirmation
ní - negation
an - normal question
nach - negative question (e. g. Aren't you the person I saw at the beach on Tuesday?)

The problem is that an, ní and nach are also used separately from the above as particles with other verbs:
An itheann tú leite?
oibríonn mé ar an Satharn.
Nach bhfuil gúna nua Mhary go hálainn?

However, don't worry too much about this, just remember the general rule:
use is with a noun
use with an adjective
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21-05-2013, 21:52   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryKirwan View Post
OK :3

Cúpla níos mó ceisteanna faoin measúnú, má ní miste libh.

Ceist 7: Féachaim __________ an teilifís.

ag
as
leis
ar

Cén fáth "ar" an teilifís seachas (rather than?) "ag". As béarla, you look AT TV, not on it. I know these things don't translate the same way. I'm just wondering if there's a particular explanation.
No specific reason, it's just that the verb féach is usually followed by ar. To be learnt and remembered!

Quote:
Question 31: Tá sé ina chónaí ar imeall __________.

na cathrach
an baile
an chathair
chathair

Roghnaigh (I chose?) mé "an chathair" ach ( = is é ) "na cathrach". Cén fáth ;_; Ní thuigim sin ar bith.
Same reason as you'd say "the edge of the city" rather than "the edge the city"in English: it's a genitive case.

Quote:
Question 35: Cé mhéad seomra leapa atá sa teach? __________

Ceathair.
Trí cinn.
Triúr.
Dhá.

Dúirt mé "Ceathair", is é "trí cinn" an freagra ceart. What's a cinn :O? It says "advanced" when I look it up.
ceann amháin, dhá cheann, trí cinn, ceithre cinn etc.

one of them, two of them, three of them, four of them etc.
(although ceann, cinn mean head, heads in actual fact. Always used in counting things when you don't actually name the thing)
Also, when you are counting things, remember to use dhá and ceithre instead of and ceathair. The rest of the numbers don't have special forms, except for counting people.
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