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Project Steel

1235

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus


    Yeah, but some fella already did all the fun stuff with it



  • Registered Users Posts: 14,723 ✭✭✭✭CianRyan


    Hey hey, it's been a while.


    It is starting to look like a bike again, new head set, new bottom bracket bearings, front wheel is decent but the rear wheel isn't coming together so will probably try and pick one up, I'd love to have this ridable this summer, even if not perfect.


    Rear stays are on odd/old size. Anyone got a single speed or fixed gear wheel in good shape with a 125mm hub?



    Will also try and salvage the crank arms this weekend. Anyone know the threat pattern for a 90's Shimano 600?




  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus



    I presume you want thread size for the pedals?


    Looking online, (link below) there are suggestions of "French" pedal sizes, which are M14x1.25

    Standard pedals are 9/16x20


    There are also suggestions that the thread pitch is close enough that you could tap the holes with an appropriate size.


    The other option is drilling out and helicoils (unless you can source French pedals).





  • Registered Users Posts: 14,723 ✭✭✭✭CianRyan


    Yes, for the pedals!

    The BB mechanism works perfectly, thankfully that was probably a little advanced for the last owner.

    They are fairly fecking stripped but I'll pick up some taps this weekend and see how they cut. I'd like to fit SPD pedals so if needs be, I'll cut to standard I guess. If it doesn't work, helicoils it is. Although, I've had those come out on me before so I'm always sceptical.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,483 ✭✭✭hesker


    You should be able to spread those stays to take a 130mm hub



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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    It's called cold setting. When I faced the same issue, I was able to take the probably 5mm locknuts off a wheel I had and replace them with what were probably 3mm ones. It was enough to allow the wheel to fit.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,483 ✭✭✭hesker


    There’s not too much to cold setting but you will likely also have to change your derailleur hanger alignment. Not much to do that either.

    After looking at those photos there seems to be something a little odd about the dropout brazing, almost like they skimped on the brazing. Got any more photos?



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp



    Apologies for hijacking an existing thread but I just thought I'd ask here... Someone was throwing this old bike away and I decided to take it. It's pretty wrecked but I feel it used to be a nice bike back in the day. What are my options here? I've put some old vintage bikes together before but I've never dealt with something in such bad nick and have no experience with stripping paint, getting rid of rust or getting something repainted (but could potentially give it a bash)

    Post edited by happytramp on


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus


    My first step there would be get the frame sand blasted, and see what your dealing with



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    what's the sticker on the head tube? my first instinct was if that's a genuine ti-raleigh, it could be interesting, but i see no sign of stickers which would tell you what tubes the frame is made from. it's not the traditional ti-raleigh colour scheme though.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,483 ✭✭✭hesker


    Can you post close up photos of the rear dropout area



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp


    Cheers guys, yeah I'll put up some clearer pics in the morning. I tried sanding the seat stays and the rust and paint came off but man, it's hard work 😂



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    You'd be better off with a wire brush attachment on a drill.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp


    Good idea... Not sure I'm as hardcore as the OP.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus


    You'd be better off again with a wire brush attachment on an angle grinder.

    Before you're offered more advice, what is your plan? Do you want to strip and repaint? Do you want to clean the frame a little and rebuild? Keep the patina? Make it look like new?

    You're next steps very much depend on the goal



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp


    Good question. It's basically to replace a Dawes galaxy myself and my partner have been using on the school run, going into town etc. She wants a small light fast bike and I reckon this frame could fit the bill. Im sort of caught between two stools. Yes, it's a run around that's going to be left in my front garden so don't want to spend a huge about of money on it, but then I'd also like it to look good. I quite fancy repainting it in the team Raleigh colours.

    Anyway here are a few closer pics. The head badge means nothing to me. But my guess was it was some local club/team that had Raleigh paint up the bike in their colours.




  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    that dropout seems to have 'campagnolo' stamped into it? you can see 'PAGNO' in the lettering that still has some paint.

    you say you don't want to spend a lot of money on it, just wondering what your budget is; i restored a bike a year or two ago and probably spent €200 all in, and i had more parts to hand. i could have easily added another €100 on top had i been missing the same number of parts.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp


    Yeah, I'd say about 200 would be okay... Like I couldn't get much to replace my Dawes for 200 at any rate. I can salvage some stuff off my old bike. Will probably just need brake calipers and an old 10sp derailleur. (possibly a BB or headset depending on if they're salvageable)

    I'm guessing my budget won't extend to getting it both sand blasted and painted.. is repainting yourself doable or will it always be a bit crappy?



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    i did it myself, stripped it back to bare metal and rattlecanned it. probably about €25 for the paint, i just used cans bought in the local motor factors. etch primer, then paint, then some cheapo laquer from aldi which was floating around the shed.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭happytramp


    Oh cool. How did it look? Is it still holding up?...and what was your process for stripping the paint?



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,700 ✭✭✭Mefistofelino


    @ happytramp

    I wouldn't be taking a wire brush on an axle grinder to that just yet. The serial number "SB 2162" means that it came from Raleigh's Specialist Bicycle Development Unit in Ilkeston around 1978. The SBDU did all the custom building for Raleigh, including the full-on Ti Raleigh frames. Unfortunately, its not possible to relate the serial number to an actual model, so you'd have to do some detective work to try to determine what it actually is, but it may be quite decent.

    It doesn't have the drilled drop-outs or extended fork crown lugs that some of top-line 753 frames had but it could well be a 531 frame like this one (main difference I see is that the red frame has the cable guides below the top tube, yours appears to have them above.

    Your paint, particularly if the "Chase Tri Club" head badge is part of the paint job, is probably a later addition. I don't think tri clubs would have been a "thing" in '78.


    Rear drops out will be 126mm so you may have to cold set the frame for newer wheels



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    wire brushes and sandpaper. the bike is still holding up, you easily can tell the paint is not as thick as a factory finish though. it's stored in a garage though, not sure how it would hold up if stored outside.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    this was it soon after finishing it (have since added mudguards and a carrier)




  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus


    I tried looking up TI-Raleigh when I saw the first pictures. I couldn't tie the colour scheme to any model or year. Custom paint job makes sense.

    It could indeed be a quite decent frame, but the reality is, it's in pretty poor condition. Sections of the rust on it look to be gone past surface rust, and I'd imagine that there's some putting on the frame.


    My first suggestion of sandblasting is still the easiest and cleanest way to bring the frame back completely to bare metal, ready for priming and painting. I've had a frame sand blasted for 50 quid

    If you don't want to go down that route, and you want to take care, hand sanding is your other option. There's a lot of work in that



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,700 ✭✭✭Mefistofelino


    If you are getting it blasted, do mention to them that the tubes are very thin. I was getting one done some years back and the guy assumed that the tubing must be 3-4mm thick and was getting out the "headstone-blasting" grit, as he called it. It would have gone clean through the tube.

    The rust pattern looks a little like the one you get on a turbo bike, from long-term sweat salt exposure.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus


    Yep, there's all sorts of blasting media, from fine sand up to lead balls. Don't get it lead blasted



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,483 ✭✭✭hesker


    Thanks for the extra photos. I wanted to see how the stay ends were finished.

    That is quite a valuable frame potentially so go easy with the wire brush. In fact I would stop what you’re doing until a proper assessment is done.

    Pity about the level of rust but hopefully it’s not too deep.

    PM me if you want to know more.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,761 ✭✭✭cletus



    There's more spots where the pitting looks to be as deep as the picture of the bottom bracket above. In that picture it looks like it's starting to flake too (the rust, not the paint).

    Fixing that up as a runaround is simple as strip, prime and paint.

    If the bike is worth money, as you suggest, then high etch primer would be needed to fill the pitting, possibly a touch of filler depending how deep it goes



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 47,851 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    out of curiosity, what damage could be done by having the rust removed with a less aggressive blasting? i assume it's going to have to come off anyway...



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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,919 ✭✭✭Kaisr Sose


    Nice find and project. Hopefully the rust is not too deep where it looks caked. Sand blasting may be best if the tubes are in good shape.

    Drop outs are Brev Campagnolo so decent frame, Reynolds 531 I would say. It's a pity it has no Raleigh head badge.

    Watch the rear wheel width with modern wheels (126 v 130mm). If you spread it too much the stress goes on the brake bridge and it can fail.

    Good luck with it.



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