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People who tested positive, how are you feeling?

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Comments

  • #2


    Do you mind me asking what it's like to get a Covid test? Some people mentioned at the start that they found it quite 'invasive'.


  • #2


    Do you mind me asking what it's like to get a Covid test? Some people mentioned at the start that they found it quite 'invasive'.


    I got one last March/April, and whilst the throat swab was unusual but fine, the nose swab was horrid. It turns out I was negative, and I had a sinus infection so a swab was not ideal. I had lured myself into a false sense of security because I've had several cameras up my nasal passage so thought a swab would be a walk in the park.

    The last time, I was expecting it to be far worse because of my previous experience and because I was sure it was just sinus again this time, but it wasn't as bad. My eyes didn't water like crazy at any rate. Anyone I know that got it and don't have chronic sinus problems seemed to find it okay, just uncomfortable.


  • #2


    Do you mind me asking what it's like to get a Covid test? Some people mentioned at the start that they found it quite 'invasive'.

    It’s uncomfortable for a few seconds but you get over quick enough. I’ve had a few in the past few days and while I’ll never get used to them I can live with it.


  • #2


    I've had quite a few because of work and I found it very much depends on whose doing it. Some are frankly bloody brutal at it and one I point blank refused their services. I have also found that early on in the game they were going much deeper with the nose swab, of late less so.

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    I must also agree - have had a few - quiet invasive and far up the nose. Didnt find the throat swab as bad. Did others who had tests get both nostrils swabbed?


  • #2


    Wanderer78 wrote: »
    it makes sense to be tested, but i suspect id be the same, im not convinced i have it, i think its largely to do with being stuck indoors with central heating

    The fun part will be tomorrow when I ask the gp who said she wouldn't see me, how I can be sure she's not got it. Has she been tested :)


  • #2


    In my mid 40s and my symptoms started Wednesday -cold/flu with a bad headache and this persisted for a few days.
    Had test on Friday 14:30. It was my 2nd time getting test and while the nose swab is uncomfortable it was not as bad as first time.
    Text message Saturday night 21:00 to confirm positive result.

    So at moment now I have cold/flu like symptoms, shortness of breath (just going up the stairs), and feel quite fatigued. I'm taking paracetamol.
    I am going to take a few days off work (thankfully still working and able to work from home), as I don't think I'd be able to do a full days work and feel drained.
    I'll need to get a sick note from GP but not sure how long to request for. I'm guessing just a few days, but I don't want to come back to work and then find I'm shattered and regret not taking longer off.
    Anyone have anything similar to this scenario?


  • #2


    Do you mind me asking what it's like to get a Covid test? Some people mentioned at the start that they found it quite 'invasive'.


    Its fine. It only lasts for a second. Dont mind the people saying it hurts.

    If you ever had to sniff that vicks stuff, well thats worse.


    If youve ever got your teeth cleaned. Thats a thousand times more uncomfortable than the covid test.


  • #2


    I tested positive the other day.
    Felt like i had a cold and the room was spinning for a few days before it. Oh and I can feel my heart beating in my chest, like when i exercise, but without exercising. Which is a good sign I guess :)
    Fine now though. I wouldnt have even bothered getting tested only HR from work rang me when they heard i had a cold and insisted i get tested.
    Dont know where I got it as I havent been in contact with anyone since Christmas Day.
    Even then it was from a distance.
    I havent been outside the door since Christmas day.


  • #2


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Dont know where I got it as I havent been in contact with anyone since Christmas Day.
    Even then it was from a distance.
    I havent been outside the door since Christmas day.


    That part is mental

    Any home grocery deliveries or Amazon deliveries etc?


  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »
    That part is mental
    Any home grocery deliveries or Amazon deliveries etc?


    Had groceries delivered a couple of times. Left in a bag on the door step. Had the normal post alright, including from Amazon.
    Cant think of any other contact though.


  • #2


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Had groceries delivered a couple of times. Left in a bag on the door step. Had the normal post alright, including from Amazon.
    Cant think of any other contact though.


    It sounds like the deliveries are the only way it got into your house though, right?


  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »
    It sounds like the deliveries are the only way it got into your house though, right?


    Probably, but thats a scary thought for the rest of the population.
    100% of households are either getting deliveries or going to the shops.
    I had post maybe twice a week on average and two grocery deliveries.


  • #2


    Can anyone who has been through this please recommend practical steps or preparation in setting up at home to get through it easier?

    We've one bedroom with an en-suite, plan is to move in there with a TV, Books and lots of paracetamol til its over..... Any other tips and advice?


  • #2


    Mango Joe wrote: »
    Can anyone who has been through this please recommend practical steps or preparation in setting up at home to get through it easier?

    We've one bedroom with an en-suite, plan is to move in there with a TV, Books and lots of paracetamol til its over..... Any other tips and advice?


    She has half a million views on the English version alone (she's dubbed it into several languages)





  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »

    "Ramanathan says oxygen saturation levels should be managed daily for the first 14 days of the illness. A normal range is 95-100 per cent. Medical intervention is needed if it drops below 93 per cent, she says, or if people develop shortness of breath."

    This is very poorly written - I presume where they've said "managed" they mean monitored because there's no indication put forward of a means or method to manage this.


  • #2


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    I tested positive the other day.
    Felt like i had a cold and the room was spinning for a few days before it. Oh and I can feel my heart beating in my chest, like when i exercise, but without exercising. Which is a good sign I guess :)
    Fine now though. I wouldnt have even bothered getting tested only HR from work rang me when they heard i had a cold and insisted i get tested.
    Dont know where I got it as I havent been in contact with anyone since Christmas Day.
    Even then it was from a distance.
    I havent been outside the door since Christmas day.

    Could be a false positive or picked up before Christmas day. PCR test can be positive for more than a month after infection even if you are fully recovered.


  • #2


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Probably, but thats a scary thought for the rest of the population.
    100% of households are either getting deliveries or going to the shops.
    I had post maybe twice a week on average and two grocery deliveries.

    You haven’t left your house or been in contact with anyone since Christmas Day? That’s a long time !


  • #2


    Wibbs wrote: »
    IIRC the rhinoviruses that cause most "common colds" have an R0 of between 3 and 6, so way higher than Covid. Flus again IIRC are around 1.5, so closer to covid.

    I suspect COVID has a "natural" R0 of between 3 and 6, but this is reduced with all the mitigation measures we are doing. I also suspect that the reason we saw a huge spike at Christmas was not primarily due to a new variant, or the opening of restaurants and especially not non essential retail, but due to lots of people mixing indoors without masks, lots of alcohol and no social distancing among friends and family.

    I also suspect the "natural" R0 of COVID will increase, as only highly transmissible variants of it will survive. Worryingly, the case of a woman in NZ who tested negative twice in isolation appears to have gotten infected during quarantine .... https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/01/25/highly-likely-new-zealand-woman-infected-covid-variant-hotel/

    EDIT: More on this : https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/25/new-zealand-covid-case-appears-to-be-south-african-variant-officials-say

    All of the above total speculation of course ...


  • #2


    Mango Joe wrote: »
    "Ramanathan says oxygen saturation levels should be managed daily for the first 14 days of the illness. A normal range is 95-100 per cent. Medical intervention is needed if it drops below 93 per cent, she says, or if people develop shortness of breath."

    This is very poorly written - I presume where they've said "managed" they mean monitored because there's no indication put forward of a means or method to manage this.


    It's a very minor quibble tbh

    She's likely saved many lives with her advice


  • #2


    fits wrote: »
    You haven’t left your house or been in contact with anyone since Christmas Day? That’s a long time !


    Just the way it worked out.
    Im living in a granny flat in my parents.
    They left Christmas day to go to my sisters house.
    Lockdown happened then and they decided to stay down there as she could look after them and they were already there.
    So just me on my todd.
    Hard to believe ive been walking around with this since before Christmas day and only got symptoms last week.


  • #2


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    Hard to believe ive been walking around with this since before Christmas day and only got symptoms last week.


    Isn't the average time of getting it to showing symptoms 5 days?

    Something isn't adding up tbh


  • #2


    Any takeaways?


  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »
    Isn't the average time of getting it to showing symptoms 5 days?

    Something isn't adding up tbh


    Thats my feeling on it. The chances of it being the post or the gorceries has to be tiny altogether.


  • #2


    phormium wrote: »
    Any takeaways?


    Yes, now that you mention it.
    2 Pizzas delivered.


  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »
    It's a very minor quibble tbh

    She's likely saved many lives with her advice

    I wasn't criticising her - I'd say it was the Times Journalists mistake.....


  • #2


    ShineOn7 wrote: »
    Isn't the average time of getting it to showing symptoms 5 days?

    Something isn't adding up tbh

    I don't know. The recent case in New Zealand came back from the UK, I think, done their two week isolation in a quarantine facility, tested negative twice while in quarantine and two days later after leaving quarantine, they developed symptoms. So I reckon there's a longer incubation period in some.


  • #2


    Could be a false positive or picked up before Christmas day. PCR test can be positive for more than a month after infection even if you are fully recovered.


    Anecdotally I have heard people say they had a bit of a runny nose or whatever and were otherwise well. A couple weeks later they need to take a Covid test for whatever reason and show up positive. People don’t all clear the virus at the same rate.

    Maybe it’s worth going for the test straight away when you have any sort of cold/flu like symptoms. A few locally have tested positive and they haven’t had any cough or fever. One person got tested at work and never had any symptoms. Others just felt like it was a mild cold with the sniffles.


  • #2


    Mango Joe wrote: »
    "Ramanathan says oxygen saturation levels should be managed daily for the first 14 days of the illness. A normal range is 95-100 per cent. Medical intervention is needed if it drops below 93 per cent, she says, or if people develop shortness of breath."

    This is very poorly written - I presume where they've said "managed" they mean monitored because there's no indication put forward of a means or method to manage this.

    I'm not seeing the problem here, to be honest. My understanding of managed is
    1.) Measured regularly
    2.) Completing the proscribed exercises (and sleep position recommendations) and re-measuring as it should have a positive impact on the O2 levels
    3.) Seek medical advice if it goes below 93%

    One thing I would add to it is that if you have a preexisting condition then your default "healthy" levels may be lower. Therefore it is important to know your own levels when healthy.
    For example, I have asthma and my O2 levels are naturally closer to 95% then 100% when healthy. Similarly, I know my default peak flow levels for lung function volumes. Using these two bits of information allows me to understand when I am sick, versus propper sick and needing medical intervention etc. (I mean generally and not specific to Covid)


  • #2


    Most stores you see or hear are healthy people with no underlying health problems but are dieing and then there are people who actually have health problems or underlying conditions who get Covid but make it through it .
    They keep saying who are most at risk but seems the ones who are way down the list are the ones who end up in hospital.


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