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Schools closed until March/April? (part 4) **Mod warning in OP 22/01**

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Comments

  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,431 Stateofyou


    eviltwin wrote: »
    Great to see some innovative thinking from schools. Unfortunately ours is asking parents to come into the school on Monday to collect books and the kids just carry on as normal.

    What do you mean, assigned work and parents teaching the material?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,481 Smacruairi


    eviltwin wrote: »
    Great to see some innovative thinking from schools. Unfortunately ours is asking parents to come into the school on Monday to collect books and the kids just carry on as normal.

    Demand more interaction. Use your class reps if you have them, defo your parent reps on board of management. If the childcare excuse is used ask for prerecorded videos on a medium like edmodo, schoology, or teams/Google classroom.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,508 ✭✭✭✭ eviltwin


    Stateofyou wrote: »
    What do you mean, assigned work and parents teaching the material?

    They will be given assignments on Google classroom - spellings, Irish and a maths problem and writing task every day. No mention of pre recorded videos or check ins or anything like that. I’ve emailed asking if a weekly zoom call could be organised, I know my son would benefit from seeing his friends and teacher, but no word so far.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,481 Smacruairi


    eviltwin wrote: »
    They will be given assignments on Google classroom - spellings, Irish and a maths problem and writing task every day. No mention of pre recorded videos or check ins or anything like that. I’ve emailed asking if a weekly zoom call could be organised, I know my son would benefit from seeing his friends and teacher, but no word so far.

    Yeah they should be better set up. If they are using Google they probs won't use zoom as its not the selected platform, but no reason they can't run a live lunch time call for everyone to chat. It could be even be supervised by a parent on a rotating basis which would create buy in by everybody.

    Key to this is everyone in this together, not the school being a service provider but the focus of thr community.


  • Registered Users Posts: 834 ✭✭✭ Eoinbmw


    eviltwin wrote: »
    They will be given assignments on Google classroom - spellings, Irish and a maths problem and writing task every day. No mention of pre recorded videos or check ins or anything like that. I’ve emailed asking if a weekly zoom call could be organised, I know my son would benefit from seeing his friends and teacher, but no word so far.
    Mine must be attending the same school lol!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,607 ✭✭✭ jrosen


    Ours teacher uses google classroom but will also be taking smaller groups for zoom. I dont believe this will be a wide spread school approach. I think we have just gotten lucky with our teacher this tear.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,924 ✭✭✭ KrustyUCC


    Liveline now is very informative now with parents on with the devastation of children with special needs not being allowed back to school


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,375 ✭✭✭✭ hotmail.com


    Joe Duffy talking about the education for special needs children.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,375 ✭✭✭✭ hotmail.com


    Aodhan O'Riordan will change his position after today's Lifeline no doubt.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,431 Stateofyou


    eviltwin wrote: »
    They will be given assignments on Google classroom - spellings, Irish and a maths problem and writing task every day. No mention of pre recorded videos or check ins or anything like that. I’ve emailed asking if a weekly zoom call could be organised, I know my son would benefit from seeing his friends and teacher, but no word so far.

    This is what I'm apprehensive about. Our children need to be TAUGHT by professional educators.
    Assume it's the principal who decides these plans?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,654 ✭✭✭ jimmytwotimes 2013


    eviltwin wrote: »
    They will be given assignments on Google classroom - spellings, Irish and a maths problem and writing task every day. No mention of pre recorded videos or check ins or anything like that. I’ve emailed asking if a weekly zoom call could be organised, I know my son would benefit from seeing his friends and teacher, but no word so far.

    If you're looking for social interaction. Get on to some of the other parents and organise a group call on any of the available platforms. That's what a group of parents did in my daughters class the last lockdown.

    Teacher can handle the education side of things i wud hope


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,431 Stateofyou


    If you're looking for social interaction. Get on to some of the other parents and organise a group call on any of the available platforms. That's what a group of parents did in my daughters class the last lockdown.

    Teacher can handle the education side of things i wud hope

    My kids love their teachers, one in particular is very close to hers. It would be a shame to not keep a connection there at all. I think she would actually be quite upset about it.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 138 ✭✭ Endintheclowns


    Triangle wrote: »
    I feel that the next ps pay increase should be balanced in favor of the sectors that have positively helped during the pandemic I. E. HSE front line, gardai and army (I'm sure there's others out there too)
    But the fact that they take on new tasks and risks without complaint should be applauded and rewarded.

    Teachers have been working in small rooms with 30 other people from different households for months now. They've played their part but alas that is now too dangerous. They've also taken on new tasks and risks without complaint btw.

    There is literally no other profession in the country where 30 people are put in such a small confined space for hours on end in the middle of a pandemic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,924 ✭✭✭ KrustyUCC


    Joe Duffy talking about the education for special needs children.

    Will all fall on deaf ears unfortunately


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,242 ✭✭✭ Inviere


    Mrsmum wrote: »
    I think something will have to be done for special needs kids. The rest of us will cope, perfectly well or badly, but we'll cope. I just caugh a bit there on Newstalk where a mother was talking about her son. He's awake night and day and spends the day lying on the floor kicking it. I only caught a small bit but that would break your heart. And there's far worse than that. Clearly those families need support somehow.

    Those families do need support. However, they've needed support for a LONG time & have only got scraps here & there. Covid & lockdowns are only highlighting issues that the media have turned a blind eye to, which have been going on for decades in this country. Sure, many of the students with additional needs have school as a huge piece of their life structure....without it, and without knowing when it'll return, makes life uncertain and confusing. This can manifest in behaviours that put families under enormous pressure.

    I'm not sure allowing these students to return to school yet though is the wisest course of action. Schools, despite the political spin, and not immune to covid. Many of the students who attend these schools have significant health concerns, and a dose of Covid in such a school would do untold damage. Yes there are bubbles and pods, but these bubbles & pods only exist at the school door....lest we forget there are bus contractors bringing a LOT of these students to school and home in small/medium sized converted vans too.

    Staff and their own families are at serious risk of contracting/spreading Covid too, by being in proximity to other staff & students. Despite what the media portrayal of a special needs school is, it is DEFINITELY not a regulated environment. Many of the students attending are not expected or able to wear masks for any length of time, many are being sent into schools with coughs, colds, sore throats, temperatures (despite attempts to mask this with Calpol etc, which wears off after a few hours and several students develop mysterious temperatures within a short time of each other), many won't understand the vital importance of social distancing, hand hygiene, etc. Despite best efforts of staff and bus escorts, there's only so much you can do with sanitiser and regular washing/cleaning. Some students also exhibit behaviors like spitting too, and at a time like this, it's completely unrealistic to expect staff to try to maintain safety using prayers and PPE. This can happen on buses also, so you've droplets continuously circulating the bus.

    It's a tremendously difficult situation for all involved, and my heart goes out to them. Do not be fooled by media portrayals of special schools being safe though. They're absolutely not, and anyone pushing for SEN students to be back as normal, are completely missing the mark in terms of their health and safety....it's by far the lesser of two evils here to keep them out of school.

    These students need safe, reliable, regular, and effective support that can be delivered in a safe manner. Throwing 10-15 students together for ~6 hours a day on buses/vans and shared areas (with zero social distancing, and NO masks) and hoping that they don't contract or indeed spread this virus is beyond my understanding. It really seems like some people have no idea of the real dangers to these students, nor a single iota of what daily school life looks like for them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,389 ✭✭✭ lulublue22


    Inviere wrote: »
    Those families do need support. However, they've needed support for a LONG time & have only got scraps here & there. Covid & lockdowns are only highlighting issues that the media have turned a blind eye to, which have been going on for decades in this country. Sure, many of the students with additional needs have school as a huge piece of their life structure....without it, and without knowing when it'll return, makes life uncertain and confusing. This can manifest in behaviours that put families under enormous pressure.

    I'm not sure allowing these students to return to school yet though is the wisest course of action. Schools, despite the political spin, and not immune to covid. Many of the students who attend these schools have significant health concerns, and a dose of Covid in such a school would do untold damage. Yes there are bubbles and pods, but these bubbles & pods only exist at the school door....lest we forget there are bus contractors bringing a LOT of these students to school and home in small/medium sized converted vans too.

    Staff and their own families are at serious risk of contracting/spreading Covid too, by being in proximity to other staff & students. Despite what the media portrayal of a special needs school is, it is DEFINITELY not a regulated environment. Many of the students attending are not expected or able to wear masks for any length of time, many are being sent into schools with coughs, colds, sore throats, temperatures (despite attempts to mask this with Calpol etc, which wears off after a few hours and several students develop mysterious temperatures within a short time of each other), many won't understand the vital importance of social distancing, hand hygiene, etc. Despite best efforts of staff and bus escorts, there's only so much you can do with sanitiser and regular washing/cleaning. Some students also exhibit behaviors like spitting too, and at a time like this, it's completely unrealistic to expect staff to try to maintain safety using prayers and PPE. This can happen on buses also, so you've droplets continuously circulating the bus.

    It's a tremendously difficult situation for all involved, and my heart goes out to them. Do not be fooled by media portrayals of special schools being safe though. They're absolutely not, and anyone pushing for SEN students to be back as normal, are completely missing the mark in terms of their health and safety....it's by far the lesser of two evils here.

    These students need safe, reliable, regular, and effective support that can be delivered in a safe manner. Throwing 10-15 students together for ~6 hours a day on buses/vans and shared areas (with zero social distancing, and NO masks) and hoping that they don't contract or indeed spread this virus is beyond my understanding. It really seems like some people have no idea of the real dangers to these students, nor a single iota of what daily school life looks like for them.

    excellent post - the whole area of special needs has been woefully underfunded and ignored by successive governments over decades. Any gains in the area of special needs has been extremely piecemeal , haphazard and hard fought for by those at the coal face.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,242 ✭✭✭ Inviere


    lulublue22 wrote: »
    excellent post - the whole area of special needs has been woefully underfunded and ignored by successive governments over decades. Any gains in the area of special needs has been extremely piecemeal , haphazard and hard fought for by those at the coal face.

    Couldn't agree more. It's why I find the sudden concern as almost nauseating. There are SEN schools out there held together by blu-tak, cellotape, and the sheer good will of those who work inside them to provide the students with all the respect and dignity they deserve. Unfortunately, I really can't say the same for the Department of Education, and even groups like TUSLA. Successive governments have been nothing short of outrageous, in their neglect of this forgotten 'sector' of education.

    Forgive me, but it almost comes across as fashionable, the sudden interest in SEN. These families and students have been neglected by governments LONG before anybody heard of Covid-19....and they'll be neglected LONG after Covid-19 has left us.

    Schools are NOT safe for these poor kids to be in, they can't be...the Department of Education just wants the school doors open, it ticks a very public box, and they all get to feel great about themselves. If Norma Foley ever set foot inside a Special School, I'd be very surprised.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,800 ✭✭✭ BonsaiKitten


    Stateofyou wrote: »
    My kids love their teachers, one in particular is very close to hers. It would be a shame to not keep a connection there at all. I think she would actually be quite upset about it.

    This is something I really noticed in my class during the last school closure. I taught live every day and we'd take a good few breaks (I was doing small groups mainly so was helpful to have time to swap them in and out). So many kids would turn up early for the sign in times or hang out in the Zoom until the last possible minute so that they could see me and their classmates.

    I'm sorry to read what's happening at your school eviltwin. I hope they step their game up because that sounds like such a lack of effort from them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 539 ✭✭✭ Teach30


    Smacruairi wrote: »
    Demand more interaction. Use your class reps if you have them, defo your parent reps on board of management. If the childcare excuse is used ask for prerecorded videos on a medium like edmodo, schoology, or teams/Google classroom.

    Please be mindful that teachers home internet may be terrible. Mine is and so limits massively live teaching and uploading long videos. I’ve asked to go into the school building so that I can do some lives. It’s not that I dont want to, I just can’t!

    Rural Ireland broadband scheme very poor and I’m not currently in position to sign up for another bill. Last time I used my mobile data and ended up with a bill for over €280 for two weeks.

    Fingers crossed the school caretaker will allow access to school for me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,389 ✭✭✭ lulublue22


    Inviere wrote: »
    Couldn't agree more. It's why I find the sudden concern as almost nauseating. There are SEN schools out there held together by blu-tak, cellotape, and the sheer good will of those who work inside them to provide the students with all the respect and dignity they deserve. Unfortunately, I really can't say the same for the Department of Education, and even groups like TUSLA. Successive governments have been nothing short of outrageous, in their neglect of this forgotten 'sector' of education.

    Forgive me, but it almost comes across as fashionable, the sudden interest in SEN. These families and students have been neglected by governments LONG before anybody heard of Covid-19....and they'll be neglected LONG after Covid-19 has left us.

    Schools are NOT safe for these poor kids to be in, they can't be...the Department of Education just wants the school doors open, it ticks a very public box, and they all get to feel great about themselves. If Norma Foley ever set foot inside a Special School, I'd be very surprised.

    Having previously worked in the area , given where we are now as a country and the fact that transmission rates in special schools has been higher than other educational settings I can’t understand how in good conscience anyone could stand over them being a safe environment for children or staff. That is not in any way to detract from the needs of the children or families involved.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,756 ✭✭✭ the corpo


    Norma has told the unions that not returning for three days a week puts the Leaving Cert in jeopardy and we might need a Plan B...

    **** **** ****
    Assume that was me swearing. There should have been a Plan B (and C, D etc.) in preparation since the first lockdown. Horrendous failure of leadership

    https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/news/norma-foley-casts-doubt-over-leaving-cert-unless-students-return-to-school-39946927.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,607 ✭✭✭ jrosen


    We are so past plan B


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,242 ✭✭✭ Inviere


    lulublue22 wrote: »
    Having previously worked in the area , given where we are now as a country and the fact that transmission rates in special schools has been higher than other educational settings I can’t understand how in good conscience anyone could stand over them being a safe environment for children or staff. That is not in any way to detract from the needs of the children or families involved.

    Totally agree. It's actually truly bizarre how there seems to be active support for putting SEN students in such harms way like this. Of course, staying out of school raises other issues, and that's where we need to step up for them, but to allow them all to mix and risk potentially their very lives....simply because they've a right to do? I have to be missing something here...


  • Registered Users Posts: 834 ✭✭✭ Eoinbmw


    lulublue22 wrote: »
    Having previously worked in the area , given where we are now as a country and the fact that transmission rates in special schools has been higher than other educational settings I can’t understand how in good conscience anyone could stand over them being a safe environment for children or staff. That is not in any way to detract from the needs of the children or families involved.
    Ive seen it mentioned here a few times now where are you getting your information on transmission rates from I'm genuinely curious?


  • Registered Users Posts: 138 ✭✭ jayo76


    ASTI school steward in our place this year, the amount of txts, whatsapps I had within a couple of hours of the announcement on Wednesday from the usual suspects to complain how the ASTI does nothing for them, is it going to really allow this to happen, had the ASTI any interest in protecting teachers.

    It really is laughable and unbelievable the amount of members who play no active role or have any interest until they feel under threat themselves, ignore or find ways of fudging various Union directives over the years to boost their own CV's, cosy up to management but then shout the loudest when they have something to worry them.

    I don't always agree with ASTI policy but if I don't I'l voice that at my branch or school meetings instead of throwing my hands in the air wondering what my Union does for me. I have heard people very vocally giving out also about Branch Secretaries, Chairpeople and how they have performed in the current pandemic. These people are filling these roles voluntarily, trying to teach, manage family life and deal with the impacts of this Pandemic the same as all other teachers, they aren't perfect but are genuinely trying their best to perform a duty for all members.


  • Registered Users Posts: 834 ✭✭✭ Eoinbmw


    Inviere wrote: »
    Totally agree. It's actually truly bizarre how there seems to be active support for putting SEN students in such harms way like this. Of course, staying out of school raises other issues, and that's where we need to step up for them, but to allow them all to mix and risk potentially their very lives....simply because they've a right to do? I have to be missing something here...
    Spend a few days with a special needs child who is suffeeing and you'll figure it out!


  • Registered Users Posts: 521 ✭✭✭ penny piper


    Norma Foley knows full well the difficulties that are facing students/teachers regarding this years Leaving Cert...I wonder if she/the government spent more time finding a solution like other countries have already and sorted this problem out.....The truth of the matter is no one knows when school will restart ...new strain of virus/continuous lockdown etc....from the article in today's independent Ms.Foley (regarding school return or no leaving cert for students) is still finding it difficult to accept that school for students/teachers/staff is still not feasable during these times..


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,399 ✭✭✭ wirelessdude01


    jrosen wrote: »
    Email from our primary school teacher, very detailed. I have mentioned before how organized and tech knowledgeable he seems to be. Hie plan to me seems very manageable and very flexible. I think it will work for all families.
    My son is very excited.

    Can you give us an outline of what he is doing in a week?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,654 ✭✭✭ jimmytwotimes 2013


    Stateofyou wrote: »
    My kids love their teachers, one in particular is very close to hers. It would be a shame to not keep a connection there at all. I think she would actually be quite upset about it.

    There will be a connection to teachers during some kind of live lesson?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8,399 ✭✭✭ wirelessdude01


    eviltwin wrote: »
    Great to see some innovative thinking from schools. Unfortunately ours is asking parents to come into the school on Monday to collect books and the kids just carry on as normal.

    What do you mean "carry on as normal"?


This discussion has been closed.
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