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Rolling stock for Dart+ expansion

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  • #2


    Has anymore spec requirements been released in terms of design and internal features.


  • #2


    What variation of the Bombardier Aventra trains could you pick for DART+?

    Image-3-Bombardier-Aventra.jpeg

    Image-2-Bombardier-Aventra.jpg

    Do Bombardier build electrical variants of the train with South Western Railways?


  • #2


    All Aventras are electric. The SWR ones are 750V DC third rail.


  • #2


    Can they be produced as BEMU? I thought Bombardier and others have a separate range/models on BEMU.

    Personally I think Siemens Mireo could be a good choice. Keeping in mind IE will be ordering a number of both EMU & BEMU. The Mireo comes in both forms and they are developing a hydrogen version.


  • #2


    Apparently they can be spec'd as BEMU too:

    https://www.railway-technology.com/projects/bombardier-aventra/
    Bombardier’s Aventra is a modular, easily customisable single-deck train capable of operating in both diesel and electric modes. It is among the fastest, smartest and most economical platforms in modern rail.

    The vehicle can be equipped with MITRAC traction batteries to operate as a battery electric multiple unit (BEMU).


  • #2


    IE 222 wrote: »
    Can they be produced as BEMU? I thought Bombardier and others have a separate range/models on BEMU.

    Personally I think Siemens Mireo could be a good choice. Keeping in mind IE will be ordering a number of both EMU & BEMU. The Mireo comes in both forms and they are developing a hydrogen version.

    The issue with Bombardier etc is that they offer variants of existing models. It's why they and Adtranz lost the ICR contract.
    I would think any future DART units will come from Japan, Korea, CAF or Stadler. They are willing to custom build units rather than just offering a variation of an existing build.


  • #2


    prinzeugen wrote: »
    The issue with Bombardier etc is that they offer variants of existing models. It's why they and Adtranz lost the ICR contract.
    I would think any future DART units will come from Japan, Korea, CAF or Stadler. They are willing to custom build units rather than just offering a variation of an existing build.

    Yeah if they were to go Siemens it would probably be some form of the Desiro. On reflection I can't see IE buying into a BEMU project such as the Talent or Mitro unless they were given a massive deal as part of some sort of launch deal. They only intend to use a small number of BEMU units as a gap filler and an adaptable EMU unit will fulfill that requirement.

    I do think they will probably lean towards a custom build. The number of alterations needed from an existing model will drag the cost up. Tokyu could have a strong lead or at least supply the bogies again. The 2600,2800& 8500s have served IE well and haven't brought about much trouble.


  • #2


    I rather like the look of the Stadler Flirt trains - fewer bogies and doors, with the option of a diesel power unit to make it operate without OH wires. Now given we need different bogies, that might be useful, and having the option of using them without OH wires might allow a significant level of flexibility.

    Having said that, I know nothing about trains.


  • #2


    I rather like the look of the Stadler Flirt trains - fewer bogies and doors, with the option of a diesel power unit to make it operate without OH wires. Now given we need different bogies, that might be useful, and having the option of using them without OH wires might allow a significant level of flexibility.

    Having said that, I know nothing about trains.

    Interesting looking train. Wales going for tri-mode which matches. A lot of the orders have been for fairly short sets with limited door access and higher speeds, which suggests suitability for longer commutes but not necessarily Dart, though.

    I really liked the feel of the Bombardier S8 sets used on London Metropolitan line when I visited, which covers 65 km distance (Drogheda is only 50km and Maynooth 26km). 3 Doubles doors, which made them easy to get on and off and huge standing capacity.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_S7_and_S8_Stock

    I'd say it will be a hard one to get right. Drogheda and Maynooth have quite different profiles to Dart. Commuter vs Rapid Transit.


  • #2


    roddney wrote: »
    Interesting looking train. Wales going for tri-mode which matches. A lot of the orders have been for fairly short sets with limited door access and higher speeds, which suggests suitability for longer commutes but not necessarily Dart, though.

    I really liked the feel of the Bombardier S8 sets used on London Metropolitan line when I visited, which covers 65 km distance (Drogheda is only 50km and Maynooth 26km). 3 Doubles doors, which made them easy to get on and off and huge standing capacity.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_S7_and_S8_Stock

    I'd say it will be a hard one to get right. Drogheda and Maynooth have quite different profiles to Dart. Commuter vs Rapid Transit.

    We will still have the current Dart stock which should all be good for another 20 years, the more recent ones for 40 years.

    Also we use the diesel commuter trains on the Dart line, and the IC ones for the PPT service, so ease of getting on or off is nor important for them.

    The Flirt trains could be equipped with the supplementary diesel power units to allow forays outside the OH lines, such as services to Arklow, or Dundalk, after the OH lines go as far as planned. Those units could of course be removed if they are not required.


  • #2


    We will still have the current Dart stock which should all be good for another 20 years, the more recent ones for 40 years.

    I thought the plan was to withdraw the LHB stock - it'll be 40 years old by the time the new carriages arrive.


  • #2


    loyatemu wrote: »
    I thought the plan was to withdraw the LHB stock - it'll be 40 years old by the time the new carriages arrive.

    Maybe, but they have been extensively reworked once, why not do that again. Is it cheaper to rework than replace? Surely it is.


  • #2


    Maybe, but they have been extensively reworked once, why not do that again. Is it cheaper to rework than replace? Surely it is.

    They'll be replaced. The mid life refurbishment was completely 15 years ago at this stage.


  • #2


    Maybe, but they have been extensively reworked once, why not do that again. Is it cheaper to rework than replace? Surely it is.

    40 years is about the lifespan of rail carriages, they're done.


  • #2


    loyatemu wrote: »
    40 years is about the lifespan of rail carriages, they're done.

    Tell that to the Isle of Wight.


  • #2


    Tell that to the Isle of Wight.

    maybe we could sell the LHB trains to them?


  • #2


    IE 222 wrote: »
    They'll be replaced. The mid life refurbishment was completely 15 years ago at this stage.

    From my reading, the plan to replace all DART carriages. The original 8100 carriages are almost 40 years old so end of life. The 8200 were scrapped (or stored for scrap) and the 8500's are 20 years old and due a midlife refurbishment, which is essential a complete rebuild from metal. The cost of the midlife refurbishment of the 8100's didn't appear very economic and given the 8500's are a tiny fleet (17 x 4 carriage sets) it would be more cost effective to just replace everything. Plus more economic maintenance at scale if all trains are the same.


  • #2


    roddney wrote: »
    From my reading, the plan to replace all DART carriages. The original 8100 carriages are almost 40 years old so end of life. The 8200 were scrapped (or stored for scrap) and the 8500's are 20 years old and due a midlife refurbishment, which is essential a complete rebuild from metal. The cost of the midlife refurbishment of the 8100's didn't appear very economic and given the 8500's are a tiny fleet (17 x 4 carriage sets) it would be more cost effective to just replace everything. Plus more economic maintenance at scale if all trains are the same.

    I wouldn't be sorry to see the back of the 8500s - most uncomfortable trains I've ever been on.


  • #2


    Their current Dart fleet is equivalent to 37 four car sets, with a further 6 sets scrapped or left to rot at Inchicore. They currently run the 8100 in sets of six, the the 8xxx run as eight car sets.

    They are all designed to be used for a long life, and if properly maintained, there is no reason to scrap them, as they are just a collection of parts in a strong metal tube with windows. However, they are worked hard with the 10 minute service, so they need more sets. However, I would see at least a decade more life in the 6100, and twenty years for the 8xxx ones.

    However, IR got rid of the old locomotive pulled trains which they could do with now, so maybe they will keep some just in case.


  • #2


    roddney wrote: »
    From my reading, the plan to replace all DART carriages. The original 8100 carriages are almost 40 years old so end of life. The 8200 were scrapped (or stored for scrap) and the 8500's are 20 years old and due a midlife refurbishment, which is essential a complete rebuild from metal. The cost of the midlife refurbishment of the 8100's didn't appear very economic and given the 8500's are a tiny fleet (17 x 4 carriage sets) it would be more cost effective to just replace everything. Plus more economic maintenance at scale if all trains are the same.

    There is 296 cars been ordered now as part of the Maynooth line upgrade. This will allow the 8100s to be withdrawn. The next batch probably won't be ordered until the final electrification phase. Keeping in mind the units will probably be delivered in batches over 1-2 year period. The 8500s will need to remain in service until the next batch arrives if BEMUs are to be used to start Hazelhatch or Drogheda DART before OHLE is completed. As long as they don't deteriorate it would make sense to keep them until the final batch arrives either way. It would be very tight and risky to withdraw the 8500s early on especially if demand was to exceed expectations.

    The current fleet is 20 sets operating at 8 and 6 car sets. I think the current service requires 17 sets to run it. Presumably Maynooth would need 12-14 sets plus the shuttles on M3 and Howth would require another 4 sets between them. If they where to start using BEMUs on Hazelhatch or Drogheda that's at least another 10-15 sets. Shuttles and probably Hazelhatch with the higher frequency could operate with 4 car sets but Maynooth and current DART would need 8 cars at peak hour. That requires 296 cars with my estimates (14×4 + 30x8) leaving no spares if the 8500s are withdrawn and Drogheda remaining as DMU.

    The new order will offer a maximum of 37 sets operating in 8 car formations. The 8500s would boost that up to 45 and would allow them to order more 8 car sets initially. Having the 8500s could allow them to order 25x8 + 24x4.


  • #2


    Their current Dart fleet is equivalent to 37 four car sets, with a further 6 sets scrapped or left to rot at Inchicore. They currently run the 8100 in sets of six, the the 8xxx run as eight car sets.

    They are all designed to be used for a long life, and if properly maintained, there is no reason to scrap them, as they are just a collection of parts in a strong metal tube with windows. However, they are worked hard with the 10 minute service, so they need more sets. However, I would see at least a decade more life in the 6100, and twenty years for the 8xxx ones.

    However, IR got rid of the old locomotive pulled trains which they could do with now, so maybe they will keep some just in case.

    A number of 8100 could and should imo be kept as a heritage fleet to run occasionally but they wouldn't be able to cope with the high frequency demand in the long term. The longer you keep them running the more expensive they become to run. Keeping the 8500s will be a matter of squeezing every bit of servicable life out of them without doing a major overhaul. They will likely see minor refurbishment just to keep them running.


  • #2


    loyatemu wrote: »
    40 years is about the lifespan of rail carriages, they're done.

    As long as the body is sound there is no reason why they cannot have a further update. The UK has done it with the SWT Class 455 units. New elecronics, AC motors, interiors etc. To the average person they look like brand new trains.

    Corrosion is what kills rail vehicles. IrishRail seem to be on the ball with that as almost all its purchases post Mk3 coach have used Corton or stainless steel.

    The Stadler Class 777 for MerseyRail looks like it could work for the DART. They have allowed longer trains to be run without the expense of extending platforms.


  • #2


    The Stadler FLIRT trains are on the Dallas Area Rapid Transit & also with Go-Ahead Deustchland. These are not fit for IÉ's platforms btw as they're too low.

    DART-Rendering_Silver-Line-right-face-Super-Silver.jpg

    Go-Ahead_Stadler_FLIRT_BaW%C3%BC_Railcolornews_1.jpg


  • #2


    The Stadler FLIRT trains are on the Dallas Area Rapid Transit & also with Go-Ahead Deustchland. These are not fit for IÉ's platforms btw as they're too low.

    DART-Rendering_Silver-Line-right-face-Super-Silver.jpg

    Go-Ahead_Stadler_FLIRT_BaW%C3%BC_Railcolornews_1.jpg

    Those two examples are clearly two different models. There are many many other models and Stadler will build a model to suit the customer. The UK has Stadler FLIRTs and platform heights there are similar to those in Ireland.


  • #2


    highdef wrote: »
    Those two examples are clearly two different models. There are many many other models and Stadler will build a model to suit the customer. The UK has Stadler FLIRTs and platform heights there are similar to those in Ireland.

    1920px-British_Rail_Class_755_at_Kimberley.jpg

    It seems the bogies are just raised, maybe some of the equipment gets shifted below the train too? They certainly seem to be pretty modular and flexible in their configurations. Bridge minimums in the UK would be the same as Ireland so shouldn't be a barrier for these.


  • #2


    I'm a little confused at where the conversation is at. The Stadler FLIRT are commuter trains. The Dart+ is an upgrade of existing commuter lines to Dart, which is a metro train. The seating layouts and door configurations applicable to commuter trains are very different to whats required for metro trains.

    I doubt commuter trains are being considered. Everything in the literature on Irish Rail site, talks about upgrade to Dart, doubling capacity of existing line from 26k commuters per hour to 52k commuters per hour per direction. It talks about extending 52k per hour to all (i.e. new) lines.

    The complexity though, seems to be that metro trains are electric only, whereas commuter trains can be electric, diesel, battery, hybrid, tri-mode etc. How that fits into Dart+ is the question for those running the procurement. Get it wrong and there'll be crush loads, like the Dart pre covid.

    As a comparison a 4 car Saddler has a capacity of about 200 (400 if 2 joined together).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_755
    An 8 cars S8 has a capacity of 1350
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_S7_and_S8_Stock

    The site also states that the majority of trains being purchased will be electric.
    It might have to be that the battery/diesel/hybrid options are dropped cause it conflicts with metro requirement


  • #2


    roddney wrote: »
    I'm a little confused at where the conversation is at. The Stadler FLIRT are commuter trains. The Dart+ is an upgrade of existing commuter lines to Dart, which is a metro train. The seating layouts and door configurations applicable to commuter trains are very different to whats required for metro trains.

    I doubt commuter trains are being considered. Everything in the literature on Irish Rail site, talks about upgrade to Dart, doubling capacity of existing line from 26k commuters per hour to 52k commuters per hour per direction. It talks about extending 52k per hour to all (i.e. new) lines.

    The complexity though, seems to be that metro trains are electric only, whereas commuter trains can be electric, diesel, battery, hybrid, tri-mode etc. How that fits into Dart+ is the question for those running the procurement. Get it wrong and there'll be crush loads, like the Dart pre covid.

    As a comparison a 4 car Saddler has a capacity of about 200 (400 if 2 joined together).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_755
    An 8 cars S8 has a capacity of 1350
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_S7_and_S8_Stock

    The site also states that the majority of trains being purchased will be electric.
    It might have to be that the battery/diesel/hybrid options are dropped cause it conflicts with metro requirement

    Surely seating capacity can be altered and replaced by metro style side seats and increased standing room. If there is significant standing room egress at stations could be easier except in crush situations, where the number of doors would be an issue.

    IR are using IC trains for commuter at the moment on the PPT service.


  • #2


    Regarding which train IR will go with from now on, IR have already stated that any train that they bring in will have toilets on board, due to the length of the possible journeys.

    I'd imagine that'll narrow down some of the possibilities, unless all of them are available with toilets?


  • #2


    Surely seating capacity can be altered and replaced by metro style side seats and increased standing room. If there is significant standing room egress at stations could be easier except in crush situations, where the number of doors would be an issue.

    IR are using IC trains for commuter at the moment on the PPT service.

    Have you tried to get on or off a Dart (pre Covid) at stops near but not in the city centre? Movement is almost impossible due to way seats are arranged. Capacity is poor compared to London Underground, which has more doors and limited seating. People congregate in the way on the Dart.

    PPT service had limited usage as it was a very new service but patronage was gaining traction. Profile would change completely with new stop at Glasnevin Junction interchanging with Metro, and Luas at Broombridge on Maynooth line.

    New stations, electrification, a more frequent service, an interchanging service, will massively drive popularity and load just like Luas.


  • #2


    Keeping in mind the bulk of services won't be "regional services" in the sense. The network will be a metro type with a mix between London Overground & Merseyrail.

    Other than the semi fast services to Drogheda I don't think the Flirt would be a high performer within the short hops. The Flirt is designed for services like Portlaise. Having to add the extra bi mode car will also effect IEs train length requirements. The fact its articulated might make it less attractive as well. I think IE will like to have the option of reconfiguring formations should they ever need to.


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