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Dublin - Building heights

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  • bk wrote: »
    It is certainly common in similar sized European cities to have commuter towns, which consist of 10 storey buildings with shops, etc. on the ground floor, clustered around a high quality metro station from where the residents commute into the city.

    Cherrywood can be a good example of this development model. But as you say the missing link is "high quality" and "metro". The Luas green line needs to be upgraded for this type of development.

    I know we are trying to reduce our reliance on private car use but I can't understand how Cherrywood got the go ahead without the upgrading of the southern part of the m50 to 3 plus aux lane. Both the Luas and m50 are going to be a disaster once its fully occupied.




  • prunudo wrote: »
    Crossing over threads here but Cherrywood and its scope for high rise is the very reason that the greenline Luas should have and still should be upgraded to metro. We seem to be building new buildings back to front in Dublin, all the higher density areas away from the city centre and its employment with no real future plan on how these residents will commute back into the city.


    Can't agree more regarding a Luas upgrade. I get it everyday and the past couple of days have been really bad at around 5.30. It was one step below people an Indian train carriage with people hanging onto the doors. From next week I'm actually changing my schedule to get into work about 90 minutes earlier so I can leave 90 minutes earlier to try to avoid the rush hour crush.




  • Five floor bollocks a stones throw from the luas. 9-10 floor residential building going up beside Dundrum town centre. You have the coast in one side , the mountains on other. There is still this strip that can accommodate relatively high density schemes on the luas line and they are making a total balls of it. The metro being ditched out to there is a disaster. When that land is built on and wasted , nowhere in Dublin is getting a new rail line with that opportunity again , other than Dublin metro out to past swords. Makes a mockery of their claim about sustainability and being serious about the housing crisis ...




  • Dublin is learning the hard way that “mass transit” and “street running” are not compatible with one another.

    Every railway system in Dublin has flaws which hinder it. The Luas has the low capacity street sections. The DART has the level crossings, lack of space for expansion, twin tracks, and the sharing of the line with intercity, commuter and freight services.

    This new policy of building dense residential schemes beside transit line which are already rammed full at peak times with limited expansion capabilities is going to lead to problems, but in reality there is no alternative.




  • The obvious alternative is to build up in the city so people there can have a walking commute!!!!!


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  • What we need is to zone areas based on building heights:

    100-150m for Appollo/Hawkins House and Liberty Hall rebuilds, 150-200m around Heuston, 200-400m in IFSC and Docklands.




  • daveomch wrote: »
    What we need is to zone areas based on building heights:

    100-150m for Appollo/Hawkins House and Liberty Hall rebuilds, 150-200m around Heuston, 200-400m in IFSC and Docklands.

    Unfortunately the ship has sailed for the Docklands.




  • denartha wrote: »
    Unfortunately the ship has sailed for the Docklands.

    for a large part yes. plenty of absolute old and even not that old buildings there though, commercial, that can be torn down and likely will be, once the rest of the brownfield sites are developed...




  • marno21 wrote: »
    Dublin is learning the hard way that “mass transit” and “street running” are not compatible with one another.

    Every railway system in Dublin has flaws which hinder it. The Luas has the low capacity street sections. The DART has the level crossings, lack of space for expansion, twin tracks, and the sharing of the line with intercity, commuter and freight services.

    This new policy of building dense residential schemes beside transit line which are already rammed full at peak times with limited expansion capabilities is going to lead to problems, but in reality there is no alternative.

    totally agree. given the way things work here, its the best thing that can happen, when the carnage reaches a certain level, theyll have to do something with the lines, it will be YIMBY and I'd say it will drown out the NIMBY morons massively!




  • denartha wrote: »
    Unfortunately the ship has sailed for the Docklands.

    The city end is almost 30 years old at this stage, La Touché, AIB and ZiFSC house might be untouchable as a coherent threedome but the Harbourmaster buildings could be ripe for demolition. For example, the Wilton Place buildings which are about to be torn down for the LinkedIn campus are only 5 years older.


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  • Marcusm wrote: »
    The city end is almost 30 years old at this stage, La Touché, AIB and ZiFSC house might be untouchable as a coherent threedome but the Harbourmaster buildings could be ripe for demolition. For example, the Wilton Place buildings which are about to be torn down for the LinkedIn campus are only 5 years older.


    I was referring to all the new buildings that have gone in or are being built with shockingly low rise. The office I working in until July, brand new structure in the IFSC, but a shameful 4 stories high.




  • Zebra3 wrote: »
    The obvious alternative is to build up in the city so people there can have a walking commute!!!!!

    All for this but it would still require high quality public transport infrastructure, otherwise every streetscape will continue to be dominated by car based transport, the pavements will remain the same width, but we'll have tens of thousands of more people using them. It's already difficult enough walking around some parts of the city as it is.




  • ncounties wrote: »
    All for this but it would still require high quality public transport infrastructure, otherwise every streetscape will continue to be dominated by car based transport, the pavements will remain the same width, but we'll have tens of thousands of more people using them. It's already difficult enough walking around some parts of the city as it is.

    While we obviously do need superior PT, extending pavements to take over car space isn't that difficult.




  • This is classic:

    https://twitter.com/barrymward/status/1196436033392594946

    If you've ever wondered what Liberty hall would look like at 32 floors, look no further. The fact that it's got "16 storeys" splashed across it makes this one of the most ridiculously scaremongering tweets I've ever seen. I'm still laughing at it.




  • CatInABox wrote: »
    This is classic:

    https://twitter.com/barrymward/status/1196436033392594946

    If you've ever wondered what Liberty hall would look like at 32 floors, look no further. The fact that it's got "16 storeys" splashed across it makes this one of the most ridiculously scaremongering tweets I've ever seen. I'm still laughing at it.

    I live very close to there. If for whatever idiotic reason you were against high rise in the city centre, or docklands there is zero excuse to be against it in Cabinteely.

    My apartment is 4 floors high. Would anyone really notice if it was 8? Nope.

    I might go to that meeting, but I'll very much be pro the building.




  • Definitely think there should be a meet up for all contributors to this thread next week at St. Brigid's Parish Hall.

    It's great to see him get absolutely torn apart on Twitter though.




  • I take it the tweet was deleted, as it's a dead link for me.




  • I take it the tweet was deleted, as it's a dead link for me.

    Yeah




  • Hi Folks,

    Anyone have any idea why the height restrictions in the SDZ docklands area are much more restrictive than the Georges Quay ( Ulster Bank ) building completed in 2002? I find this really baffling. This building seems to buck the trend of the usual anti height arguments ( overlooking customs house, too close to Georgian Dublin etc). The building is 60m, and looking from the city center you have a tall older building then and load of recently built squat boxes strewn out along the river on sites even further from the customs house/ Georgian core.

    If they had taken the Geroges Quay height as a guide to continue building into the SDZ i.e 60m min we'd have 1000's more apartments/ office spaces.

    from the SDZ site i found this "Two landmark buildings up to 22 storeys (88m) are allowed, but most development will be eight-storeys high"

    Would love to understand the logic here. Apart from the obvious density benefits it would be much more aesthetically pleasing.




  • I take it the tweet was deleted, as it's a dead link for me.

    Did anyone get a screenshot of it.


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  • prunudo wrote: »
    Did anyone get a screenshot of it.
    https://twitter.com/lynyrd_cohyn/status/1196477376814862336




  • Rulmeq wrote: »




    Is being a psychotic a prerequisite for running for office in this county?




  • MrAbyss wrote: »
    Is being a psychotic a prerequisite for running for office in this county?

    you have to be extremely backwards and be anti everything! Imagine someone ran on a YIMBY platform, instead of the usual scare mongering one all those fools compete over!




  • Councillors condemn plans for 45-storey building on Dublin's Quays

    https://www.rte.ie/news/dublin/2021/0225/1199406-dublin-development/




  • The poor dears living there will be over whelmed.

    We need high buildings there. and the view would be great.




  • I guess he’s only actually looking to build 30 storeys high but this is how Ireland works...




  • Yeah. It's a big shame that DCC are objecting these plans to improve the Docklands overtime.

    It has to be said there is a lot of prime real estate out there in that part of the city that can provide a huge potential of suitable housing in some shape or form when the population of the city gets increased over the next few years. I remember walking through part of that area near the 3 arena before a few years ago. I was shocked & saddened about the amount of land potential that was just left there rotting to waste with nothing of any use to anyone who live in the local community. It really was a crying shame to see that part of Dublin being left with nothing of any worth along with the amenities of the Luas, the 3 arena & the big cinema there right beside it. It just looked so depressing.

    RTÉ's EcoEye was highlighting this problem of urban sprawl in their recent episode in Cork & Limerick. Duncan Stewart was looking at all the abandoned properties some part of Limerick City with him also saying that it was a shame to see to see all those properties lying vacant with proper use being made for young families or people who want to live in the city.

    Now I know that some things have changed along Alexandra Road in Dublin some years back. Was there a development of new apartments & office buildings being built there some years ago. Is that still being built there or is that finished?

    It really is critical for DCC right now to not mess up their vision for this part of the city. If they start listening to the young professionals who work full time in the city centre; they have to really take on the task of really listening to their concerns seriously if they want to have accomodation nearby their own workplace if they want to avoid commuting into Dublin in the near future. This huge tower block being built by Johnny Ronan sounds a perfect solution for a small section of the young professional demographic who can afford to buy these apartments in they want to work in the city.




  • Back in the before times when I was still commuting to Dublin, there was something especially depressing about seeing those two massive empty lots when disembarking on O'Connell St. You're sucking up the extra commute to save a bit on rent, and every day you pass the same oldp prime real estate lying perfectly empty because "me architectural heritage".




  • JohnC. wrote: »
    Councillors condemn plans for 45-storey building on Dublin's Quays

    https://www.rte.ie/news/dublin/2021/0225/1199406-dublin-development/

    Thanks for sharing.

    I had a quick read through the article and the same myopic sentiment prevails. At the end of the day, anything is an improvement on what is there currently. Also, a public viewing area at the top would be excellent.


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  • ABP rejected DCCs proposed amendments to the docklands SDZ, saying that the restrictions to height, even if they have been increased, are not in line with government policy.

    See here.


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