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Are you getting your child 5-11 vaccinated? Why/why not?

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 12 zefirki


    My husband has the same,2 inches exactly...u r not alone dude...keep strong!!feel ur pain!



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,165 ✭✭✭✭ fits


    Yes. For risk of MIS C and long covid alone. Also an acquaintance’s kid just <5 got covid this week and had a febrile seizure. His first. One of mine is a close contact I found out today so hopefully first dose will give some protection.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,640 ✭✭✭ Balmed Out


    Yeah both have had first dose already. Both have friends with siblings who would be in higher risk groups and having spoken to two friends who are GPs I had no doubt it was the right thing to do for their sake as well as others.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,484 ✭✭✭ johnire




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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,377 ✭✭✭ bb1234567


    There is also no long term effects of covid known. But out of covid and the vaccine, covid has killed several thousand children worldwide and hospitalised several thousand, while the vaccine has not.

    And btw, I think vaccine on kids is a waste when there are elderly people in the developing world dying of covid . But the argument about long term side effects is nonsense while you allow a kid to be infected with something we know is already more harmful in the short term but with similar unknown about long term safety.



  • Registered Users Posts: 394 ✭✭ ISOP


    no way



  • Registered Users Posts: 30,375 ✭✭✭✭ Lumen




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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,710 ✭✭✭ raind


    So a boy in my sons class (first), told them all that “My manny said you need an operation to get the vaccine and that it’s very sore for two weeks after”. Guess who is afraid their children are going to be coming home asking why they aren’t getting the vaccine. What is she going to tell them when the ask “how come some of my friends have have it and they only had a sore arm for a day”.

    Also, Interesting to the see the “we know very little about these vaccines” schtick is still going strong after billions of doses have been administered with hundreds of millions having been given to kids.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,377 ✭✭✭ bb1234567


    I have no doubt they were fine, seeing as healthy children have a 99.999% chance of being fine from COVID. But that's short term. You specifically said it was the long term effects of the vaccine you were afraid of, as we know short term it's harmless to children just like covid. But as I said the point does not make much logical sense if it is the LONG term effects you fear seeing as we do not know the long term effects of covid either, so I don't understand why you are so sure covid would pose no issue long term while fear a vaccine may do. Surely you see where I'm coming from with my point.

    If I had children I would leave it up to them, if they really wanted the vaccine I'd be happy for them to get it as risk of side effects look very low. I think it might be good to get it to maybe stop them getting a potential bad dose and not miss school, something like that..fear of your healthy child being killed or hospitalised by covid is verging on irrational. But certainly my reasoning for them not getting the vaccine would not involve fear of long term effects, because if that was my fear, COVID is clearly the one more likely to pose risk of long term effects, however small the chance may be.



  • Registered Users Posts: 12,165 ✭✭✭✭ fits


    Well as expected we didn’t get as far as second dose before we caught it. One of my two children was a close contact Thursday and Friday and came down with it Sunday - exactly a week after the first jab. Sunday night was rough enough but he seems ok this morning



  • Registered Users Posts: 9,710 ✭✭✭ raind


    Five year olds, in my experience, are more rational than at least half the posters in this place



  • Registered Users Posts: 388 ✭✭ tommybrees




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  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 20,322 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Pawwed Rig


    That was certainly the held belief a few months ago but I haven't heard anyone say that since omicron. The HSE are not saying it anyway so are you sure that is still the case?



  • Moderators, Politics Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,925 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Chips Lovell




  • Registered Users Posts: 7,797 ✭✭✭ Nuts102


    You think five year olds will be crying to their parents that their friend got a needle.

    I think its more likely they will be crying because they don't have a Nintendo switch.

    I doubt you have any experience of five year olds if you think they want to get needles and talk about Covid.



  • Registered Users Posts: 385 ✭✭ mcgragger


    I've two kids and I've no intent to get them jabbed. If they are not in danger from omicron then I'm not getting them medicated against it.

    And to add they are aged 9 and 6 and I'd consider them fairly switched on lads. They Haven't once complained about anything covid related since the restrictions started to lift and not once have they asked about vaccines. Its not in their thought process.

    It's way off the mark to suggest kids will be jealous of their mate that got a needle



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,003 ✭✭✭ MacDanger


    From what studies I've read, the vaccine is still effective against omicron just to a lower level than it had been against earlier variants. That being the case, the scenario of reduced transmission that I outlined above would be expected to still hold true albeit at a lower level also



  • Registered Users Posts: 388 ✭✭ tommybrees




  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 20,322 CMod ✭✭✭✭ Pawwed Rig


    Is it such a minute level though that means the point is largely irrelevant? No one seems to be using this as a reason to get kids vaccinated. The experts aren't mentioning it and neither are the HSE. This is the only reason I can see that would justify vaccinating my kids but I have been unable to find ANY data on it post omicron



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,003 ✭✭✭ MacDanger


    You're right, it's not included in any of the HSE literature so it may well only be applicable at a very low level against omicron, or just that there's no data available, I don't know.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 14,281 ✭✭✭✭ astrofool


    Protection against severe disease is about 89% with Omicron for the vaccines, I haven't seen any reliable data on transmission yet (probably too early for it to be available). It will probably have some effect (waning eventually), but it's unknown what that is.

    There is early data (mostly from hospitalisations in the US being higher than here, but that could be down to underlying conditions as well) that highly vaccinated countries are doing better against Omicron.



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