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Wild boar released

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Comments

  • #2


    I don't pretend to know of the intricacies of pig farming but I do know why alot of the food safety regulations came into being and it wasn't all to do with modern food production. Many of the traditional practices of farming were no longer compatible with safe practices and many of the issues associated with food production are in fact historical.

    Could you expand on that because it is really relevant?
    But in the UK and Ireland they have been searching for it. They found it once in a wild animal (a fox) in 52 years.
    ....and still you don't get the relevance of that fact. I won't repeat myself.

    No I dont. My view would be you check for everything possible. But if you arent finding it or anybody suffering from the disease, then it can't be there and even though you don't stop looking, you pay particular attention to what is there. For example the other worms etc.
    I do believe that after eating green mouldy sausage rolls, having a silver fish run under my black pudding, finding slugs and bird ****e on my salad, getting ill from a fried chicken outlet and a relation getting worms from purchased sandwiches (wash hands), .

    Every example you give above is why we have checks and balances in the food industry, if not it would be alot worse then the public perceive.

    Believe me I know a lot more than whats there. As you know there IS a lot goes on.
    Really, .... well thanks, obviously when you can't put together a rational, cohesive and factual argument you just turn to smart and snide remarks.

    I can chat rationally and quite intelligently to the cows come home. But I am not going to have my words twisted as you did yet again with salmonella...............For your info.........Untill Edwina Curry highlighted what was going on. We didnt associate Salmonella with chicken or have or even do the things about it as we do now. You pointed out Salmonella had been discovered 100 or so years ago. This is correct. Until the chicken/egg disclosure most people associated Salmonella with shellfish because of their love of living by sewage outlets as we pumped it into the sea. Together with Hepatitis and a whole lot of others.


  • #2


    1484246711-raw-chicken-strips.jpg

    Can we all just agree that this is wrong!

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.



  • #2
  • #2


    What is it?

    Rare chicken breast.

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.



  • #2


    Feisar wrote: »
    1484246711-raw-chicken-strips.jpg

    Can we all just agree that this is wrong!

    How much did you pay for it?


  • #2


    Any time I got a bad gut on foreign holidays, it was always the chicken. I just avoid it now


  • #2


    Birdnuts wrote: »
    Any time I got a bad gut on foreign holidays, it was always the chicken. I just avoid it now

    A good chicken dish can move you ...... a bad one can move you in so many different ways.


  • #2


    How much did you pay for it?

    It’s s pic from the net. Apparently it was a thing for a while.

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.



  • #2


    Sushi...The one cusine art, I've yet to try. And being mad enough, I'll even try the fugu fish dish.:D

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"

    "And it’s something that, way back — 150 years ago, when I was Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, we spent a lot of time working on and setting up victims’ funds. " President Joe Biden on signing the crime funds act, East Room, White House ,July 24th 2021

    " My Butt's been wiped!" President Joe Biden to camera crew July 27th 2021



  • #2


    Pigs eat anything except onions. They will kill and eat birds and probably small animals if they can get them as well.

    A pig is a domesticated boar many times bred for different reasons. At one time for fat but more today for meat. At one time for their young meat and other times for the older meat.

    Heard a very funny story about this. A lad near me with a few acres had bit of everything on the farm. He used fatten a few pigs. One year he got a load of young drakes from s lad that had laying ducks. He had about 70 at the start.
    A few went missing and then a few more. He spend nights up watching for foxes, he made sure the ducks were locked up at night. But the ducks kept on disappearing.

    This day he was back in his shed. The pugs were in there pen where they had Access to the outside. A duckling passed in front of the pig pen out came a pig snout grabbed the duck by the neck .By the to e he got to the Len there was only a few feathers left.

    As he said most people have heard of duck stuffed with bacon but he has pork stuffed with ducks


  • #2


    Heard a very funny story about this. A lad near me with a few acres had bit of everything on the farm. He used fatten a few pigs. One year he got a load of young drakes from s lad that had laying ducks. He had about 70 at the start.
    A few went missing and then a few more. He spend nights up watching for foxes, he made sure the ducks were locked up at night. But the ducks kept on disappearing.

    This day he was back in his shed. The pugs were in there pen where they had Access to the outside. A duckling passed in front of the pig pen out came a pig snout grabbed the duck by the neck .By the to e he got to the Len there was only a few feathers left.

    As he said most people have heard of duck stuffed with bacon but he has pork stuffed with ducks

    I saw this happen to a pigeon which landed in the outside part of the pig pen. No doubt the pigeon eyed up a few bits of grain from the straw. The pig moved faster than lightening and disappeared in about 3 chews.

    Another 'gilt' I was watching. A young pig giving birth to her first lot of young, gave birth to her first. As soon as it popped out and made a noise, she stood up and killed it instantly and that was soon gone. She probably thought it was giving her a pain in the rear so sorted it out and pigs waste nothing.

    It is very related to the topic. Because the ability to eat anything makes them great survivors. The cold will kill the large white indoor pigs. But the hairy old Tammys are a very hardy type and most likely your wild ones or crosses of such.

    They are also very clever. They watch and learn. The only fence which holds them is a very good and strong electric fence. But if their food runs out and they see more on the other side. They will soon find away to beat that fence.

    And there is probably your wild boar, but surely your wild pig.


  • #2


    Feisar wrote: »
    I've minced ribeyes at home and cooked them up with a bit of pink in the middle. But I reckon I was wrong in my thinking. There's nothing special about a steak in terms of food safety. By mincing it I was mixing the outside of the cut with the inside.
    If you minced a steak you bought previous at home, then yes you'd be just dispersing the bacteria through the mince - which might be a lot depending on how old it is. In that case I'd sear quickly before mincing for the burger.

    However, when I get my butcher to do it. He cuts a fresh steak off a whole piece. By the time you trim it a bit, and cut a few steaks off (not using the first one for mince). There very little of those steaks that were "outer surface".

    So there should be much lower ratios of bacteria verses mince that you pick up that was sitting around. Time is a big factor for bacteria.


  • #2


    In other news unrelated to this debate :-) they got the missing animal.

    https://www.farmersjournal.ie/remaining-wild-boar-in-kerry-dispatched-629852


  • #2


    Your best rule of thumb with any mince is to 'nuke it' cooking wise - go the full 'hog' on the internal temp - 75C. Even when the meat product is free of bacterial pathogens it is very easy to contaminate the mince from outside sources (cross contamination) such as equipment, work surfaces and individuals. Most bacteria associated with various meat products are easily controlled by proper storage and final cooking temperatures that a carried out on a day to day basis in your own homes. Keep the product cold during preparation and storage then cook well and serve hot as soon as possible.


  • #2


    Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    As for rare beef.Cant get any rarer than raw steak tatare.Which is delicious, but needs to be shock frozen to kill off all parasites,and is even today risky with mad cow disease.I do like my steak "blue"ditto rare burger,but trying to get someone to cook such in a resturant is a problem,because of fear of litagation.So the idea of "undercooked pork" is going to be an even harder sell.

    Your not going to cook away Mad Cow disease unless your turning meat to charcoal, it's caused by a prion (replicating protein) that requires properly high temperatures of 100+ C to deactivate.


  • #2


    Your not going to cook away Mad Cow disease unless your turning meat to charcoal, it's caused by a prion (replicating protein) that requires properly high temperatures of 100+ C to deactivate.

    That's true, but the tissues affected by BSE have been removed from the food chain. An over reaction at the time was seen when the likes of T bone steaks and Rib Roast on the bone was no longer available. The laughable 'boneless T Bones' that turned up on the supermarket shelves always made me smile.
    Previous practices of classifying all products of cattle as 'meat' has been stopped. In the past a steak and kidney pie could in fact be all kidney or worse 'arseholes, lips and eyeballs'.
    'Within the European Union, meat is, in principle, considered as skeletal muscle deriving from specified animal species, which may include edible offal and blood'(yes I Googled this part)
    Labeling legislation also helped to cleary identify component parts of made up dishes and helped compel manufacturers to comply with standards.


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