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Wild boar released

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  • They've been in Laois (I say have as its been a few years since I seen one) for a while now. Its more feral pig than Boar, but they're out there.

    Had a picture of them on here from a few years ago. Must see if I can find it.

    Wonder who released them? Isn't it illegal and punishable by fine, etc?

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  • . That lot in the pic look like Tamworths rather than wild boar.
    They would indeed be a great quarry to have here.Just you'd find them residing more in our cities than the countryside as they will move to the most easiest food sources available for them.

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"





  • Would they be good on the BBQ, smoking all day?

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    . That lot in the pic look like Tamworths rather than wild boar.
    They would indeed be a great quarry to have here.Just you'd find them residing more in our cities than the countryside as they will move to the most easiest food sources available for them.

    They aren't Tammy's Grizzly. They may be a cross, but there are some boarish signs in one of the little ones.




  • Those lads in the pic are def not European WB either. They arent "humpy" enough in their postures. the EU WB has a more hunched posture and a more massive head and shoulders build giving them a humpback look So this is probably a stock pic?
    Be interesting to see what those yokes look like that the NPWS "humanely euthanised" [with a lead injection presumably]:D:D:D

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"



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  • Feisar wrote: »
    Would they be good on the BBQ, smoking all day?

    Very much so..Best are the piglets' strip and tenderloin,done in a BBQ foil wrap with some red wine and mushrooms.
    I Dunno would cooking a mature WB be anyway tasty? As they get older they get tougher and sinewy.So I'd say hanging for a good while would be needed? Any hog butchers in the house to advise?

    Confucius say."He who says one man cannot change World. Never has eaten bat soup in Wuhan!"





  • Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    Those lads in the pic are def not European WB either. They arent "humpy" enough in their postures. the EU WB has a more hunched posture and a more massive head and shoulders build giving them a humpback look So this is probably a stock pic?
    Be interesting to see what those yokes look like that the NPWS "humanely euthanised" [with a lead injection presumably]:D:D:D

    Lead injection being a bullet?




  • Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    Very much so..Best are the piglets' strip and tenderloin,done in a BBQ foil wrap with some red wine and mushrooms.

    Oh yes, all day long, ...............:D

    Have some in fridge for BBQ this week-end, bummer though, its not wild or free range......:mad:

    It will still go down a treat with a glass or two of something........:)




  • If you did happen to come across any 'Irish Wild Boars' your better off to err on the side of caution and freeze the meat prior to consumption. This will help with parasite / worms etc.

    Most of the older animals that my French connections eat go into pate and sausages. The pate being more of a terrine type product - rough / consistency of tinned corn beef, not the smooth liver pate.




  • Found one picture, but cannot find the other one.

    Seen it on the road, with two others. Two ran into the woods and this guy ran along the road, for a short while, before bolting right back into the woods.

    This was 8 years ago.

    556299.jpg

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  • If you did happen to come across any 'Irish Wild Boars' your better off to err on the side of caution and freeze the meat prior to consumption. This will help with parasite / worms etc.

    I doubt if they would have any more worms than any other type of wild animal.
    Most of the older animals that my French connections eat go into pate and sausages. The pate being more of a terrine type product - rough / consistency of tinned corn beef, not the smooth liver pate.

    This true of older pigs. Their meat is better suited for sausages, pies etc. Pork pie isnt eaten by most Irish people though.




  • I doubt if they would have any more worms than any other type of wild animal.

    Bog Trotter99, the main 'game meat' eaten in this country consists of Leporids, Cervidae, Anatidae and Phasianidae (order Galliformes) and also Columbidae. By and large these animals are herbivorous and the birds omnivorous with a general diet of leaves, insects, wild fruit, nuts and grains. The issues with feral pigs / wild boar (Suidae) is that they are omnivorous and altough a large percentage of thier diet (90%) is plant based they do eat meat and in particular carrion. It is the cycle of infection that is the issue. They eat parasite infected meat, they become infected, we eat thier untreated meat and we become infected.

    Control of Trichinella
    Trichinella is a parasitic nematode worm that can cause disease (so-called trichinellosis) in people eating raw or undercooked meat from Trichinella-infected domestic animals or game. The parasite may infect pigs, horses, wild boar, foxes, wolves, bears, skunks, raccoons, rats and other mammals including sea mammals and carnivore birds.

    EU legislation establishes special rules for the control of trichinellosis including the requirement for systematic tests for Trichinella in all slaughtered pigs, wild boar and horses, except in pigs from holdings or compartments officially recognised as applying controlled housing conditions.

    https://ec.europa.eu/food/food/biological-safety/food-borne-diseases-zoonoses/control-trichinella_en
    Trichinella in feral wild boar
    Wild boars that are not farmed are classified as ‘feral’.
    When wild boar scavenge for food, the food they eat could be contaminated with trichinella increasing the risk of infection.
    Feral wild boar that have been shot by hunters and are supplied directly to consumers or local retailers, need to be tested for trichinella.
    https://www.food.gov.uk/business-guidance/trichinella




  • There's lots of info and pictures on this site.
    https://maps.biodiversityireland.ie/Map/Terrestrial/Species/119291




  • Cookimonster

    Through accident I spent many years on a pig farm were the pigs who were kept in buildings were fed steamed potatoes, barley and pig meal (made from soya). These pigs could never catch worms because they never saw a field and were kept isolated from wild animals. Hence they never received worm dose or needed to. Not all pigs are kept like this. Some even back then were kept on open ground and in orchards because it was easier. So some pigs were kept on open ground and not given worm doses and could have been infected with parasites.

    Their intestines were still offered for sale though, sold as sausage skins and chitlins (raw intestines for a meal popular with oldies). I should imagine that these intestines were washed before going for sale as they were white, whereas normally intestines are full of food in different states of being digested and quite discoloured.

    As far as I know it was the intestines and digestive system which could have given you worms. I know nothing of the other meats.

    All animals get worms. That is why we dose sheep and cattle. But even then many animals including pigs can go for slaughter and be full of worms and other parasites.




  • Grizzly 45 wrote: »
    Those lads in the pic are def not European WB either. They arent "humpy" enough in their postures. the EU WB has a more hunched posture and a more massive head and shoulders build giving them a humpback look

    Facebook video footage here

    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=1466062573759115




  • Bog Trotter99, the main 'game meat' eaten in this country consists of Leporids, Cervidae, Anatidae and Phasianidae (order Galliformes) and also Columbidae. By and large these animals are herbivorous and the birds omnivorous with a general diet of leaves, insects, wild fruit, nuts and grains. The issues with feral pigs / wild boar (Suidae) is that they are omnivorous and altough a large percentage of thier diet (90%) is plant based they do eat meat and in particular carrion. It is the cycle of infection that is the issue. They eat parasite infected meat, they become infected, we eat thier untreated meat and we become infected.


    Pigs eat anything except onions. They will kill and eat birds and probably small animals if they can get them as well.

    A pig is a domesticated boar many times bred for different reasons. At one time for fat but more today for meat. At one time for their young meat and other times for the older meat.




  • Pigs eat anything ............
    One of my favorite scenes from the movie Snatch.

    WARNING: Strong language, NSFW.

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  • To be clear the parasite Trichinella lives in muscle tissues and is not similar to intestinal parasites such as tape worms so the use of intestines for sausage making is not the issue, hog casings are still readily available in both domestic and commercial markets. It is infact the meat ingredient of the sausage that is the risk.
    In the bygone days when individual or small droves of pigs were kept for domestic slaughter there was a better control and approach to feeding and maintaining them. In later years the use of swill was unregulated and poor practices could lead to issues with infection etc, etc. The issue here is the consumption of contaminated food sources which would be more likely found in the in the wild.

    AFAIK it is mandatory in certain EU countries for wild boar to be tested by local authorities before it may be consumed by humans.




  • Tested for what?




  • Most of the fish you eat is riddled with worms. Do you panic then?


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  • Pheasants, Partridge? Rabbits are crawling with everything.

    The veg you eat has been growing in ****e and been pissed on by every wild animal in the area.




  • Tested for what?

    Tested for the parasite Trichinella.

    'Currently, all wild boars shot in Denmark or shot abroad and imported to Denmark for consumption must be tested for Trichinella spp.. Wild boars are asymptomatic carriers of Trichinella spp., while the symptoms of trichinellosis in humans include mild non-bloody diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, persistent fever, sweating, chills, periorbital oedema, urticarial rash, and conjunctival or splinter and ungual haemorrhages'
    (06 March 2020
    Petersen, H.H., Takeuchi-Storm, N., Enemark, H.L. et al. Surveillance of important bacterial and parasitic infections in Danish wild boars (Sus scrofa). Acta Vet Scand 62, 41 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13028-020-00539-x)




  • Pheasants, Partridge? Rabbits are crawling with everything.

    The veg you eat has been growing in ****e and been pissed on by every wild animal in the area.

    Will you stop being silly. I post a genuine piece of verifiable and factual information not only from academic sources but from people who I personally know and have hunted with, who themselves have been hunting and eating boar for decades. If the consumption of furred and feathered game here in Ireland presented any serious and regular risks to the consumer then we would be aware of it and take relevant precautions. Wild boar or feral pigs are not common big game here and there fore its justifiable to present the genuine risks that can be associated with the improper preperation and consumption of the meat. I remind you again this is a parasite of the muscle, which we would consume, not a tick , flea or either intestinal or organ infestation by worms or flukes etc,etc. These either play no role in causing harm in most cases or are easily spotted in post mortem inspection by the hunter unlike the Trichinella parasite.

    Just for your information parasite worms found in fish do not pose a threat to human health once the fish is cooked to 60C or above. Fish that may be infected and intended to be consummed raw, such as Sashimi, must be frozen before hand. As fish has a different protein structure then meat or poultry it cooks quicker and at lower temperatures, therefore parasites are easily killed and rendered harmless.

    It is a free world and you may do what you wish with your next batch of boar meat, but for me I'll stick with what is being advised when it comes to processing and cooking wild boar.




  • Will you stop being silly. I post a genuine piece of verifiable and factual information not only from academic sources but from people who I personally know and have hunted with, who themselves have been hunting and eating boar for decades. If the consumption of furred and feathered game here in Ireland presented any serious and regular risks to the consumer then we would be aware of it and take relevant precautions. Wild boar or feral pigs are not common big game here and there fore its justifiable to present the genuine risks that can be associated with the improper preperation and consumption of the meat. I remind you again this is a parasite of the muscle, which we would consume, not a tick , flea or either intestinal or organ infestation by worms or flukes etc,etc. These either play no role in causing harm in most cases or are easily spotted in post mortem inspection by the hunter unlike the Trichinella parasite.

    Just for your information parasite worms found in fish do not pose a threat to human health once the fish is cooked to 60C or above. Fish that may be infected and intended to be consummed raw, such as Sashimi, must be frozen before hand. As fish has a different protein structure then meat or poultry it cooks quicker and at lower temperatures, therefore parasites are easily killed and rendered harmless.

    It is a free world and you may do what you wish with your next batch of boar meat, but for me I'll stick with what is being advised when it comes to processing and cooking wild boar.

    Calm down Cooki.

    My points are if you read my other post was that everything you eat is contaminated to some degree.

    Domesticated pigs were since about the 1950's moved indoors to produce fatty meat, but this quickly changed. Of late they are in better places outdoors running free again. Some even crossed Tammy's with wild boars are the free rangers and possibly escapees.

    These outdoor pigs could get infected with parasites just as the wild boar. They are both at the end of the day the same animals as domestic pigs originated from the wild boars.

    When I was younger, people got worms. I know someone who got worms from food they ate caused by a dirty person.

    If you caught worms in old days and were run down or ill then I think you were at risk.

    I think the bad one is the tapeworm from a pig which can lodge in your brain but out in the far east I think.




  • Wild pork is generally pretty dry, IME, best cooked in a turkey bag in the oven to try and retain some moisture with lardons or strips of pork fat added.

    Use some domestic belly pork if you are making Paté or Terrines to add fat, fat is flavour in these products.

    Most of the stuff I have eaten was knife stuck not shot so may be different when dogs are in the mix and the pig is fighting before being stuck.

    If you can stalk one and shoot it in the boiler room it may be completely different.
    Forget shoulder shots, they will do little to the pigs mobility, you really need to get behind the shoulder and into the vitals.




  • Any idea how they test pork for Trichinella.




  • Any idea how they test pork for Trichinella.

    Antibody test.




  • CJhaughey wrote: »
    Antibody test.

    Before antibody tests came into being was it tested? Presuming that the antibody test is a relatively new test.




  • Before you all get paranoid from your latest hog roast read here to see its basically non existant in Ireland and prevented if it was ever there by cooking your meat properly.

    https://www.hpsc.ie/a-z/zoonotic/trichinellosis/factsheet/


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  • Just wondering what did people do before all this latest technology came into being. I have heard of Trichinella before but never heard of anyone that was infected with it.
    Any idea how the antibody test works.


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