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Pieta

  • 09-05-2021 9:48am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,751 ✭✭✭ Patrick2010


    Saw 6 million euro was raised yesterday for Pieta to prevent suicide. I looked but can’t see how this money is spent or how much their executives earn, does anyone know?


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Comments

  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators, Regional North Mods, Regional West Moderators Posts: 81,470 Mod ✭✭✭✭ biko


    Sinn Féin spokesperson for Mental Health, Mark Ward TD, has questioned the high salaries of the management of Pieta House. The salaries of the top six earners combined are in excess of €500,000 per annum; with the CEO being paid a salary of €120,000 plus benefits.

    It has also been revealed that Pieta House will pay €420,000 in redundancies this year and had been running at loss pre-Covid.

    “I am shocked to find out that the CEO of Pieta earns a €120,000 per annum, rising to almost €150,000 after benefits.

    “I also received information from some self-employed therapists who had contacted me and other members of my party that counsellors only charge Pieta €24 per hour, yet the State is funding Pieta to the tune of €1,146 per hour.
    https://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/59493


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,183 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    Saw 6 million euro was raised yesterday for Pieta to prevent suicide. I looked but can’t see how this money is spent or how much their executives earn, does anyone know?

    Another gravy train


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,496 ✭✭✭ Abominable Dr. Phibes


    120k for a CEO is very low, especially considering the profile of the charity.

    I presume the permanently outraged will be up soon, but you’d make that easy in Dublin working in law/accounting/medicine/specialised IT etc.

    Nothing to see here. That Mark Ward lad must have little to do.


  • Registered Users Posts: 23,183 ✭✭✭✭ lawred2


    biko wrote: »

    “Pieta also availed of the wage subsidy scheme"

    Nice


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Professor Moriarty


    120k for a CEO is very low, especially considering the profile of the charity.

    I presume the permanently outraged will be up soon, but you’d make that easy in Dublin working in law/accounting/medicine/specialised IT etc.

    Nothing to see here. That Mark Ward lad must have little to do.

    Yeah. Let's get someone highly qualified and very experienced to manage an organisation employing 200 people across 13 centres throughout Ireland. Let's pay the minimum wage. It'll be grand.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ PCeeeee


    120k for a CEO is very low, especially considering the profile of the charity.

    I presume the permanently outraged will be up soon, but you’d make that easy in Dublin working in law/accounting/medicine/specialised IT etc.

    Nothing to see here. That Mark Ward lad must have little to do.

    What percentage of people in Ireland make that kind of money or above it was the question I asked myself when you posted.

    https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-eaads/earningsanalysisusingadministrativedatasources2018/distribution/

    That kind of wage puts you in the 97th percentile for salaries (2018 data admittedly), it would seem that as easy as you think it is to make that only 3 people in an hundred in Ireland manage to do it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 105 ✭✭ SSeanSS


    The basic salary of a backbench TD is €96,189. I’d quieten down if i were him.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,882 ✭✭✭ Smee_Again


    PCeeeee wrote: »
    What percentage of people in Ireland make that kind of money or above it was the question I asked myself when you posted.

    https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-eaads/earningsanalysisusingadministrativedatasources2018/distribution/

    That kind of wage puts you in the 97th percentile for salaries (2018 data admittedly), it would seem that as easy as you think it is to make that only 3 people in an hundred in Ireland manage to do it.

    How many people in Ireland manage a business with annual income of over €13m.

    I don’t have much time for charities but if we’re going to use them to provide much needed services then we need properly qualified people to run them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,536 ✭✭✭✭ Beechwoodspark


    Saw 6 million euro was raised yesterday for Pieta to prevent suicide. I looked but can’t see how this money is spent or how much their executives earn, does anyone know?

    I just HOPE that pieta is being run responsibly

    They have a huge presence now in society


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,536 ✭✭✭✭ Beechwoodspark


    lawred2 wrote: »
    Another gravy train

    A friend said similar to me yesterday evening :(


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,496 ✭✭✭ Abominable Dr. Phibes


    PCeeeee wrote: »
    What percentage of people in Ireland make that kind of money or above it was the question I asked myself when you posted.

    https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-eaads/earningsanalysisusingadministrativedatasources2018/distribution/

    That kind of wage puts you in the 97th percentile for salaries (2018 data admittedly), it would seem that as easy as you think it is to make that only 3 people in an hundred in Ireland manage to do it.

    See the post about. If you run a charity that has multiple centres, fund raising activities, staff etc then you aren’t going to get Mike who drives a forklift down the hardware store to run it.

    120k sounds very cheap tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ PCeeeee


    Smee_Again wrote: »
    How many people in Ireland manage a business with annual income of over €13m.

    I don’t have much time for charities but if we’re going to use them to provide much needed services then we need properly qualified people to run them.

    I don't disagree, I'm refuting the idea that a 120k salary is common place. If the discussion proceeds from there then it is clear the CEO and the other 4 high earners wages are in fact appropriate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ PCeeeee


    See the post about. If you run a charity that has multiple centres, fund raising activities, staff etc then you aren’t going to get Mike who drives a forklift down the hardware store to run it.

    120k sounds very cheap tbh.

    No one suggested that?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,496 ✭✭✭ Abominable Dr. Phibes


    SSeanSS wrote: »
    The basic salary of a backbench TD is €96,189. I’d quieten down if i were him.

    His party also own at least 50 properties down here. They could donate one or two of them to Pieta if they were feeling generous.

    Running a charity involved in suicide prevention for 120k is being on the gravy train! Jesus, some people don’t live in the real world at all. For them it’s a world where everything is terrible, a scam, and people are out to rip society off.

    Joke


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,882 ✭✭✭ Smee_Again


    PCeeeee wrote: »
    I don't disagree, I'm refuting the idea that a 120k salary is common place. If the discussion proceeds from there then it is clear the CEO and the other 4 high earners wages are in fact appropriate.

    Ah, fair enough. It’s not commonplace but it’s not outlandish for the work either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,496 ✭✭✭ Abominable Dr. Phibes


    PCeeeee wrote: »
    No one suggested that?

    How much should the CEO of a large charity make in your opinion?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ PCeeeee


    Smee_Again wrote: »
    Ah, fair enough. It’s not commonplace but it’s not outlandish for the work either.

    Exactly, I think it's fair to discuss it.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Bannasidhe


    Smee_Again wrote: »
    How many people in Ireland manage a business with annual income of over €13m.

    I don’t have much time for charities but if we’re going to use them to provide much needed services then we need properly qualified people to run them.

    It's not supposed to be a 'business'.
    It's a charity reliant on money from the State and donations.

    Elaine Austin the CEO came from Bank of Ireland - an organisation well known for it's charitable work and involvement in mental health issues.

    The qualified people - i.e. those providing the services are on as little as €25k.

    Pieta House in another Rehab. Rich pickings for those at the top whose main skill is signing application forms for grant aid, and exploitation of those doing the actual work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,414 ✭✭✭ PCeeeee


    How much should the CEO of a large charity make in your opinion?

    I actually have no idea. I would have to understand their role and what their abilities bring in terms of added value.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,773 ✭✭✭ duffman13


    120k for a CEO is very low, especially considering the profile of the charity.

    I presume the permanently outraged will be up soon, but you’d make that easy in Dublin working in law/accounting/medicine/specialised IT etc.

    Nothing to see here. That Mark Ward lad must have little to do.



    He's actually a nice fella and done some good work locally in his area as a Councillor. I met him doing the doors for the last election and he had a very poor knowledge of anything and his messaging was populist nonsense. O'Broin is a different level and very articulate. Sinn Fein need better quality candidates for the Dail though, Ward is a reasonably good Councillor but way out of his depth on the national scene. Given himself and Gino Kenny are two of the local reps, he's still probably not the worst person from Dublin Mid West in the Dail

    Pieta is local so I can see why he brings it up even if its a bit naive

    Edit: Maybe not so naive, surprised at the redundancy situation, would hope its top earners and not front line staff but wouldn't be shocked if it's a huge reduction in services


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  • Registered Users Posts: 580 ✭✭✭ Meeoow


    Saw 6 million euro was raised yesterday for Pieta to prevent suicide. I looked but can’t see how this money is spent or how much their executives earn, does anyone know?

    You can Google pieta house accounts. All their years accounts are downloadable. Same with most charities. It's shocking how little goes where it should go. That is why I don't give to them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,176 ✭✭✭ HBC08


    biko wrote: »

    Sinn Fein are insulting peoples intelligence with this sort of nonsense.

    Meanwhile back in the real world that's a modest salary for a CEO of such an organisation.

    If they want to get outraged about people's salaries look at Tubridy or John Delaney before him.


  • Posts: 0 [Deleted User]


    Well if they can prevent a few people from taking their own lives and all the devastation that follows for those families then I don't care where the money goes..


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,332 ✭✭✭✭ Professor Moriarty


    Bannasidhe wrote: »
    It's not supposed to be a 'business'.
    It's a charity reliant on money from the State and donations.

    Elaine Austin the CEO came from Bank of Ireland - an organisation well known for it's charitable work and involvement in mental health issues.

    The qualified people - i.e. those providing the services are on as little as €25k.

    Pieta House in another Rehab. Rich pickings for those at the top whose main skill is signing application forms for grant aid, and exploitation of those doing the actual work.

    Christ. They are not qualified or experienced to be CEO of Pieta House. Nor would they want the responsibility. This is simplistic nonsense.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,882 ✭✭✭ Smee_Again


    Bannasidhe wrote: »
    It's not supposed to be a 'business'.
    It's a charity reliant on money from the State and donations.

    Elaine Austin the CEO came from Bank of Ireland - an organisation well known for it's charitable work and involvement in mental health issues.

    The qualified people - i.e. those providing the services are on as little as €25k.

    Pieta House in another Rehab. Rich pickings for those at the top whose main skill is signing application forms for grant aid, and exploitation of those doing the actual work.

    Nonsense you need qualified people in all positions. A therapist won’t have the skills to oversee a budget of that size. Just like the CEO won’t have the skills to deal with a suicidal patient.

    The issue you’ve highlighted isn’t the CEO’s salary, it’s the low salary for the therapists and counsellors (I’m not sure what their correct title is so apologies if it’s something else).


  • Registered Users Posts: 787 ✭✭✭ hawley


    Smee_Again wrote: »
    Nonsense you need qualified people in all positions. A therapist won’t have the skills to oversee a budget of that size. Just like the CEO won’t have the skills to deal with a suicidal patient.

    The issue you’ve highlighted isn’t the CEO’s salary, it’s the low salary for the therapists and counsellors (I’m not sure what their correct title is so apologies if it’s something else).

    Because people who worked in Irish banking are excellent at managing their budgets.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,224 ✭✭✭ zerosugarbuzz


    120k for a CEO is very low, especially considering the profile of the charity.

    I presume the permanently outraged will be up soon, but you’d make that easy in Dublin working in law/accounting/medicine/specialised IT etc.

    Nothing to see here. That Mark Ward lad must have little to do.

    Depends on many factors. Previous experience and success of the CEO. current achievements and contributions to the role. Also take into account the generous mileage, car allowance, health care, pension plan and the 120 salary is very much exceeded.


  • Registered Users Posts: 510 ✭✭✭ Cal4567


    lawred2 wrote: »
    “Pieta also availed of the wage subsidy scheme"

    Nice

    Not to do with Pieta specifically, but I reminded of the fair few charities that availed of the now forgotten Job bridge scheme back a decade ago. No media outrage but I remember real jobs being withdrawn and being re-advertised, with some minor changes as Job bridge. OK, a lot of these was done by private companies but a fair few charities did the same.

    As it is politely referred to - the optics don't look good. The inference is that organisations who don't need to, availing of these advantages.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 19,219 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Bannasidhe


    Christ. They are not qualified or experienced to be CEO of Pieta House. Nor would they want the responsibility. This is simplistic nonsense.

    And a banker is qualified to run a charity how exactly?
    What qualifications in the provision of mental health services are gained while re-organising a bailed out bank?

    Simplistic nonsense me hole. There is a cadre of 'CEO's' who move from highly paid job to highly paid job - Paul Reid is another example - with feck all actual experience in the field in which we are told they are 'highly qualified'.

    The point of Pieta House is meant to be the provision of qualified help to vulnerable people - to do this they require qualified psychotherapists but are reluctant to pay them a decent wage.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,882 ✭✭✭ Smee_Again


    hawley wrote: »
    Because people who worked in Irish banking are excellent at managing their budgets.

    Some are, some obviously weren’t. BOI were one of the better Irish banks at it.

    Besides you can’t blame everyone who worked in banking with collapse. I doubt Elaine Austin in her HR role during the lead up to the crash had much influence in the bank needing a government (don’t call it a) bailout.


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