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How do you feel about sending your kids back to school?

  • 23-08-2020 5:29pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ twinkletoes


    Hi there,
    If this post is in wrong place apologies. but just wondering how people are feeling about this? My husband and I are very nervvous tbh, we've one primary age, one secondary..both on school buses too...how is it going to honestly be prevented when everything going spreads in schools? Its the elderly relatives i worry about..


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 17,508 ✭✭✭✭ eviltwin


    I’ve one in primary and he’s not going back right away. I have two people at home with chronic health issues, one will probably be in serious trouble if he gets Covid so I’m taking a wait and see approach.


  • Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ twinkletoes


    eviltwin wrote: »
    I’ve one in primary and he’s not going back right away. I have two people at home with chronic health issues, one will probably be in serious trouble if he gets Covid so I’m taking a wait and see approach.

    Sounds like a wise approach, our primary child is back Wednesday and cant wait, but we're having doubts now....


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,584 ✭✭✭ screamer


    Absolutely conflicted and tormented. She is high risk herself and we’ve had numerous hospital visits when younger all respiratory related. If I had my way she’d not set foot back at school, and I’ve strongly considered home schooling. But, she has begged to go back, she needs to see her friends and have some routine in her life.
    If I send her back, she could be fine, she could catch coronavirus and be very sick or she could even die from it. What a choice to give parents.


  • Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ twinkletoes


    screamer wrote: »
    Absolutely conflicted and tormented. She is high risk herself and we’ve had numerous hospital visits when younger all respiratory related. If I had my way she’d not set foot back at school, and I’ve strongly considered home schooling. But, she has begged to go back, she needs to see her friends and have some routine in her life.
    If I send her back, she could be fine, she could catch coronavirus and be very sick or she could even die from it. What a choice to give parents.

    Thats really tough,sorry for you. Its crazy I think the speed theyve done this, it shouldve been delayed enough to even get the buses sorted even..I mean whats the rush when peoples lives are at risk?.Could they back out yet?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 336 ✭✭ Frank Old Skin


    Delighted to have my kids going back to school. They need an education and some sort of normality. Disappointed that they will be forced to wear masks all day. I think they should be allowed take the mask off during the classes.
    Hope the schools don't close when there are covid cases in the school.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ twinkletoes


    Delighted to have my kids going back to school. They need an education and some sort of normality. Disappointed that they will be forced to wear masks all day. I think they should be allowed take the mask off during the classes.
    Hope the schools don't close when there are covid cases in the school.

    Yeah totally know where youre coming from, felt the same only now thinking seriously about if it gets into schools and brought home to the vulnerable and vulnerable kids in schools...it is a reality and hope and pray it doesnt end badly.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 336 ✭✭ Frank Old Skin


    Yeah totally know where youre coming from, felt the same only now thinking seriously about if it gets into schools and brought home to the vulnerable and vulnerable kids in schools...it is a reality and hope and pray it doesnt end badly.
    Honestly this is why I've had a problem with the lockdown, except in that it gave the hospitals time to get ready, as I don't think it can be stopped.
    I have no doubt that coronavirus will take off once the kids go back to school. I think it would have been better for this to happen during the summer when people are healthier and we don't have the regular flu.
    Hopefully, when cases take off again, they close the pubs and not the schools.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,714 ✭✭✭ ThewhiteJesus


    Sounds like a wise approach, our primary child is back Wednesday and cant wait, but we're having doubts now....

    I’ve two in secondary and honestly I’m happy, they need to go back. In relation to not sending them back, is that not against the law ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 336 ✭✭ Frank Old Skin


    I’ve two in secondary and honestly I’m happy, they need to go back. In relation to not sending them back, is that not against the law ?
    Probably but I can't see any enforcement.
    Our school will be live streaming to kids in the school hall and the fear is that many kids will take the classes at home as opposed to the school hall.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,640 ✭✭✭✭ meeeeh


    Two in primary and they are going back. MIL has dinner with us every evening and she is in late seventies so I will keep an eye on the sniffles and stuff but I'm not overly worried. It's a country school too.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    Mine is going back. I’m going to be teaching in a secondary school anyways so he will be no more high risk than me. However we will almost certainly not see either sets of grandparents this side of the summer unless things go particularly well. Both are very high risk and we would never forgive ourselves. Technically I’m high risk too but will be masked and hoping for the best


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,320 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Primary children won’t be socially distanced and because classrooms are so small , one suspected case will mean the other 29 have to be sent hone .

    It’s shocking that the department has made no provision for children who are high risk .


  • Registered Users Posts: 585 ✭✭✭ Minier81


    It’s shocking that the department has made no provision for children who are high risk .

    I believe they had made provision for the "very high risk" category but not for the "high risk" category. The "high risk" category is 25% of the population.....they are to take extra care whereas the very high risk are the cocooners.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,837 ✭✭✭ RoryMac


    My 2 are in secondary school with the youngest going into first year. They'll be going back, the lockdown has been a massive disruption to their education and they need to get back to a settled routine.

    Worried that all of the restrictions with mask wearing in school and less open break times might have a negative impact on the youngest one settling in the new school and making friends.

    Will definitely be more careful once they go back about visiting grandparents etc


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,320 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Minier81 wrote: »
    I believe they had made provision for the "very high risk" category but not for the "high risk" category. The "high risk" category is 25% of the population.....they are to take extra care whereas the very high risk are the cocooners.

    No, they haven’t . There’s a vague mention of a “ non mainstream teacher “ liaising with a special ed. and the classroom teacher , but no extra resources for this .


  • Registered Users Posts: 85 ✭✭ Keisha07


    My youngest is starting secondary we are very anxious, of course about the chances of becoming ill but more so about how the social distancing and mask wearing etc will impact setting in and making friends.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10 ✭✭✭ March2323


    Think some rural schools with small numbers will have an advantage here. They will be able to socially distance and virus not as prevalent in areas of low population density. However, towns and cities with large school numbers are facing a lot of challenges. Its a risk and it's well fudged over by the government. New creative names for classes and groups, bit of plastic signage and handwashing will not take away from the overcrowded classrooms. I see a local secondary while doing their best are encouraging students to go home at lunchtime or avail of their outdoor eating areas. No thought given to how cold, wet and windy it can be in the middle of winter! Mask wearing while definitely safer will be challenging for some students. Mask wearing inhibits communication and students who are sitting in isolation for long periods certainly will not be improving their wellbeing. The new school environment will be a sad place for all.Blended learning should be offered to those who want it, split classes and it would allow those who attend school to go there safely. No guarantees for anyone but some schools are extremely overcrowded and teachers and school management cannot make space where it simply doesn't exist. I feel sorry for first years in particular and for those students who genuinely find it hard to sit in the same place for hours on end.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 ✭✭✭ kali.mist


    I have a 9-year-old in school in the North. He has a slight heart problem and Asthma. He is going in for two hours tomorrow. If I can help it, he won't be going in again until the schools are eventually closed due to the unavoidable disaster that is about to unfold. His mum (divorced) does not want him going in at all.
    I have a 15-year-old heading back on Friday here in the South to a school with about 1000 pupils, 30+ per class. He is going in for a couple of hours. He won't be going back in....etc.
    I don't think folks realise what this virus does to the body even if it does not kill. "Kids need to be in School". Kids need to be safe and not physically damaged for the rest of their lives. A missed couple of months of education hardly compares.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,692 ✭✭✭ SteM


    Our young lad is going into 3rd class. We had a zoom call with the principal, vice principal and parents of the 2nd to 6th class kids during the week and I'm happy enough with the way the call went to let him go back. It'll be a different experience for him but he needs to go back.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,289 ✭✭✭ This is it


    I'm unsure as to what to do but son's mother is diabetic and has decided to keep him home, for her safety as much as anything. I understand the need for education and socialising but we'll just have to do our best at home for now.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 12,451 ✭✭✭✭ pwurple


    Feeling good! The children are excited about seeing their friends again. The school is well prepared and sent out details and plans. I went in today and helped paint all the lines for the parent drop off areas.

    Delighted the learning is starting back up, and I hope this gap hasn't damaged too many children's education.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,547 ✭✭✭ micks_address


    Lucky ours are within walking distance so no buses. Unless the HSE telling lies it does seem that kids just don't pass on the virus. Of course time will tell. Roll on the vaccine asap. They really looking forward to going back.


  • Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 13,403 Mod ✭✭✭✭ pc7


    They did a few summer camps over the summer and didn’t pick up a sniffle so hoping that’s a good sign. Back in creche last week and so far so good. One will be in creche one going to senior infants. They have gotten very good at washing hands, using sanitizer, sneeze etiquette etc. will change and bath them as soon as home. Have told my folks no more hugs or kisses :( for now. Just have to try it, they need school and mixing with kids.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25 ✭✭✭ kali.mist


    This is it wrote: »
    I'm unsure as to what to do but son's mother is diabetic and has decided to keep him home, for her safety as much as anything. I understand the need for education and socialising but we'll just have to do our best at home for now.


    I think you are doing the right thing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 282 ✭✭ twinkletoes


    kali.mist wrote: »
    I have a 9-year-old in school in the North. He has a slight heart problem and Asthma. He is going in for two hours tomorrow. If I can help it, he won't be going in again until the schools are eventually closed due to the unavoidable disaster that is about to unfold. His mum (divorced) does not want him going in at all.
    I have a 15-year-old heading back on Friday here in the South to a school with about 1000 pupils, 30+ per class. He is going in for a couple of hours. He won't be going back in....etc.
    I don't think folks realise what this virus does to the body even if it does not kill. "Kids need to be in School". Kids need to be safe and not physically damaged for the rest of their lives. A missed couple of months of education hardly compares.
    Totally agree


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,692 ✭✭✭ SteM


    Primary children won’t be socially distanced and because classrooms are so small , one suspected case will mean the other 29 have to be sent hone .

    That's not what we were told regarding suspected cases.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,692 ✭✭✭ SteM


    kali.mist wrote: »
    I have a 9-year-old in school in the North. He has a slight heart problem and Asthma. He is going in for two hours tomorrow. If I can help it, he won't be going in again until the schools are eventually closed due to the unavoidable disaster that is about to unfold. His mum (divorced) does not want him going in at all.
    I have a 15-year-old heading back on Friday here in the South to a school with about 1000 pupils, 30+ per class. He is going in for a couple of hours. He won't be going back in....etc.
    I don't think folks realise what this virus does to the body even if it does not kill. "Kids need to be in School". Kids need to be safe and not physically damaged for the rest of their lives. A missed couple of months of education hardly compares.

    But why even bother sending your 15 yo in at all if you feel so strongly about it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,015 ✭✭✭ Ludo


    Twin boys heading into first year in secondary school. They need to get back into a routine etc so glad it is happening. Unlike the above comments, I am not too bothered about the friends thing etc. It is such a big change anyway going into secondary, that being restricted to class group, masks etc will possibly lessen the transition as it will be a possible bonding experience and force them to get to know their new classmates rather than seek out their old friends at lunchtime.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,875 ✭✭✭ lawrencesummers


    Grand.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 25 ✭✭✭ kali.mist


    SteM wrote: »
    But why even bother sending your 15 yo in at all if you feel so strongly about it?

    Yeah, I know. A contradiction in terms of course. The children live with me, but I am fighting for custody. Its optics. Not happy about it at all. He is a smart kid and totally aware of what is happening. He will be wearing a N95 charcoal filtered mask and will have spray etc. Its a couple of hours and I reckon there will be many missing. Its a bit of a gamble, but I don't know what else to do really


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