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How will schools be able to go back in September?

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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 33,842 ✭✭✭✭ Boggles


    Very low risk of students and teachers transmitting Covid-19 at school, Australian study suggests:


    https://www.thejournal.ie/effective-testing-tracing-schools-5166779-Aug2020/

    There is far more comprehensive "live study" taking place at the moment.

    Two Sydney schools closed after students test positive for coronavirus


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,429 ✭✭✭ facehugger99


    s1ippy wrote: »
    My brother works for the HSE (consultant) and was reassigned from his usual work to do swabs, in the height of this in April. He moved out of home for two months to protect his family. He messaged this evening "There's no way we'll be putting [child] into an environment where people are under pressure to send their children, under threat of investigation by TÚSLA."

    Depressing to see that some parents will be jeopardising their kids educations and futures due to their own hysteria.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,332 ✭✭✭ Deeec


    I think a way schools could deal with parents that send their kids to school sick would be to send a message out to all parents when a child goes home sick. This embarrasses and shames the parents - I think it would make parents think twice before sending their kids to school sick. Probably all kinds of data and gdpr issues here though.

    I think though it is going to be hard to judge when to keep a child at home. Lots of kids have runny noses and coughs all through the winter.

    Sadly also some parents cant leave their jobs during the day. Im lucky I can leave my job if I get a call that one of the kids are sick - the work has to be done but it is not urgent. My husband on the other hand is in a job that if he leaves it disrupts the whole business - it is essential he does his job when he is rostered. He cant leave. I pity parents that dont have flexibility.

    Also in secondary schools I can see some smart alecs coughing through class with the hope that they will be sent home straight away.

    Also the situation could arise where a teacher gets a call during the day to collect their child from school. Possibly there is no available teachers to look after their class. The class cant be divided and sent to other classes. Its going to be a problem for alot of parents.

    Also maybe someone can answer with what symptoms would a child be sent to the isolation area? Would they be sent home if they had a runny nose but no temperature?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,365 ✭✭✭ Alrigghtythen


    Boggles wrote: »
    There is far more comprehensive "live study" taking place at the moment.

    Two Sydney schools closed after students test positive for coronavirus

    3 pupils and the 2 schools were closed for cleaning


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,842 ✭✭✭✭ Boggles


    3 pupils and the 2 schools were closed for cleaning

    So far. And it's not just cleaning.
    Both schools have been closed for deep cleaning and NSW Health teams have begun contact tracing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,363 ✭✭✭ FishOnABike


    Queried wrote: »
    All very good points, then education system is such an important part of our society and provisions need to be made to support families financially should a child display symptoms and need to be tested. Children catch colds and viruses so easily, wiping up snots is a large part of the job for 6 months of the year for many infant teachers :) Given that it would appear children are incredibly low risk (thank God) it's understandable that many wouldn't be too concerned about cold-like symptoms. However, as alrigghtythen mentioned, schools have a duty of care not only to other pupils but to society. Hopefully provisions will be put in place to encourage people to do the right thing and not be afraid of struggling financially as a result.
    I can't believe people still believe this. It was never more than wishful thinking at best, deliberate misinformation at worst.

    Recent extensive studies of over 60,000 contacts in South Korea have shown over 10s are as likely to catch and transmit CoViD-19 as adults, if not more likely.¹

    The outbreak in a Georgia,US camp² which infected 260 children and teens shows younger children to actually be at more likely to catch CoViD-19 than older children.
    "The overall attack rate was 44% (260 of 597), 51% among those aged 6–10 years, 44% among those aged 11–17 years, and 33% among those aged 18–21 years"

    ¹ https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/18/health/coronavirus-children-schools.html
    ² https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6931e1.htm


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,363 ✭✭✭ FishOnABike


    It’s not about “ turning a blind eye.” If a parent drops a child at the gate and disappears and refuses to answer their phone , there’s nothing a primary school do Most primary schools don’t have spare rooms or staff for an “ isolation space.” The DES cover these things by saying “ where possible .”
    I guess that's the one extra teacher per school accounted for. If this is anyway regular they will end up having to spend a signoficant amount of their time supervising those in isolation. Now just to find the spare room (after implementing all that good social distancing) to put them in.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,446 ✭✭✭ munchkin_utd


    The one thing I dont understand is why the dept of education seems to be looking to have a universal plan that rural schools in areas that never had a case, and are not likely to see many if any in the future, are lumped in with (party loving) Dublin and the Pale which has 90%+ of cases nowadays.

    It seems to me that Dublin/ Kildare/ Laois need a cautious return to school as theres a distinct risk of someone having the virus and causing spread. Down in rural ireland especially in primary schools where students really come from a limited catchment area, theres little chance of an infection in the first place so whats all the fuss about?

    As an example of how its progressing elsewhere, the first regions have gone back to school in Germany yesterday (indeed, early finish to summer holidays) and gone back with full classes with little change to normal, so no distancing, no masks, just more ventilation than normal, lots of hand washing etc.

    I was somewhat shocked to hear what they are doing, but the one thing to note they have VERY low infection rates, probably eqivalent to rural Cork/ Galway/ Mayo etc. . The chance of anything happening is minimal, and theres a 4 level plan in place for alternating days etc should the situation in the community get worse, and thats implementable at a town / district level, all schools in whole state wouldn't be affected by a local cluster.
    In other states who will be going back over the next weeks, there's unfortunately higher infection rate so they'll likely have more stringent conditions, staggered starts and whatnot.

    it seems like a sensible enough strategy to recognise that in places of little risk, theres little risk and little need for full blown emergency measures, and places with low/ medium risk you need to be more careful if not much more careful.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,365 ✭✭✭ Alrigghtythen


    Boggles wrote: »
    So far. And it's not just cleaning.

    What action do you think they should take?


  • Administrators, Computer Games Moderators, Entertainment Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 54,399 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭ Mr E


    Mod: Thread was coming close to the 10k limit so I've locked it.
    Continued here:


    https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2058101870


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