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“Your father works for my father”

  • 13-02-2020 11:02pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ v638sg7k1a92bx


    Seriously, I know many rugby fans are in denial but can we call a spade a a spade and just accept that rugby, in Dublin in particular, is considered by many and evidenced by the the article in the Irish times as an old school, garrison, “West Brit” sport.

    Particularly In light of the election results last week, the article in the IT, the fake south Dublin accents, the aping of the Tory boy mentality in England, the entire post colonial mentality. This is why Irish rugby team will never win a World Cup, because the players derive mostly from private fee paying schools and they just don’t have the grit or toughness. Fan boys on here will argue that this topic has been covered before and try and brush it off but these type of incidents keep popping up that they cannot just be pushed aside, if you are a real rugby fan you have to address this issue.

    Article is here https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/rugby/your-father-works-for-my-father-schools-rugby-turning-toxic-in-the-stands-1.4172843


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    Rugby is a sport. Lots of people enjoy it as players and spectators. That is all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,641 Dog Botherer


    sounds like you need a hobby tbh


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 49,446 CMod ✭✭✭✭ awec


    OP - you originally linked some random article about Dominic Cummings in your post, I assume that was a mistake and I've fixed the link to the Irish Times article I think you meant to link.

    Since this is a piece in a mainstream media outlet, I will let this thread stay open for now, but at the first sign of crap it'll be closed. If you're incapable of having a serious discussion then don't post in this thread. There'll be a low tolerance for nonsense.


  • Registered Users Posts: 767 ✭✭✭ eclipsechaser


    Seriously, I know many rugby fans are in denial but can we call a spade a a spade and just accept that rugby, in Dublin in particular, is considered by many and evidenced by the the article in the Irish times as an old school, garrison, “West Brit” sport.

    Particularly In light of the election results last week, the article in the IT, the fake south Dublin accents, the aping of the Tory boy mentality in England, the entire post colonial mentality. This is why Irish rugby team will never win a World Cup, because the players derive mostly from private fee paying schools and they just don’t have the grit or toughness. Fan boys on here will argue that this topic has been covered before and try and brush it off but these type of incidents keep popping up that they cannot just be pushed aside, if you are a real rugby fan you have to address this issue.

    Article is here https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/uk/johnson-s-purge-leaves-him-free-to-spend-his-way-to-popularity-1.4173092?mode=amp

    You're right. Post colonial attitudes are what's stopping Ireland winning the World Cup. Must be why South Africa did so badly this year...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    awec wrote: »
    OP - you originally linked some random article about Dominic Cummings in your post, I assume that was a mistake and I've fixed the link to the Irish Times article I think you meant to link.

    Since this is a piece in a mainstream media outlet, I will let this thread stay open for now, but at the first sign of crap it'll be closed. If you're incapable of having a serious discussion then don't post in this thread. There'll be a low tolerance for nonsense.

    Yes I meant to link the recent article. I understand what your saying about the thread going off the rails but bearing in mind recent political events around social status in Irish society and this recurring theme around rugby and it’s support I think this is a genuine subject which deserves to be thrashed out.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    You're right. Post colonial attitudes are what's stopping Ireland winning the World Cup. Must be why South Africa did so badly this year...

    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    sounds like you need a hobby tbh

    Judging by the article it won’t be rugby.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,641 Dog Botherer


    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.

    i mean this is untrue to the point where it’s so obviously untrue that it’s a waste of time refuting it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 767 ✭✭✭ eclipsechaser


    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.

    South African rugby is grassroots - that's pretty ignorant of reality. Is their grassroot nature the reason they introduced a racial quota?

    I've been on a train full of Mayo GAA supporters minding my own business only to be spat on. Do you reckon I should message the Mayo team telling them that's why they haven't won the Sam Maguire lately?


  • Registered Users Posts: 794 ✭✭✭ Rockbeast2


    "Your father works for my father" is in fact a fraternal call between affluent Southside rugby players and an affirmation that both players' fathers have jobs and pay taxes.

    It can often be perceived, possibly correctly, as an attack on the "working" class "Das" of similarly aged soccer players who may not have jobs or pay taxes. This may cause discontent and resentment.

    * LOL Bit of harmless banter/sledging. Funny, too.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,713 ✭✭✭ saabsaab


    'old school, garrison, “West Brit” sport.'



    Isn't that Soccer?


    Anyway Dev was a secret rugby player.


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,978 irishbucsfan


    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.

    Of course it is played at a grass roots level in Ireland. All sports are. That's what junior rugby is. You just don't know what you're talking about.

    There is definitely a strong following in South Dublin, but rugby is strongly supported and played at all kinds of levels across the island


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,693 ✭✭✭ aloooof


    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.

    It really, very isn’t. The reason Siya Kolisi, for example, was so lauded during the RWC is because he is the exception that proves the rule.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,612 ✭✭✭✭ stephen_n


    Difference is that Rugby in SA is played at grass roots levels whereas in Ireland it is not so you’ve actually just inadvertently reinforced my point.

    That’s completely and utterly wrong, but do continue displaying a complete lack of knowledge about rugby in Ireland.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7,278 ✭✭✭ Your Face


    It's like the OP was angry at something else and the first thing he saw was an article about rugby.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,325 ✭✭✭ Dave_The_Sheep


    Particularly In light of the election results last week

    I'm curious as to what you think the election results have in relation to the popularity or potential lack of success of Irish rugby. Could you elaborate?


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,536 ✭✭✭✭ thebaz


    Yes I meant to link the recent article. I understand what your saying about the thread going off the rails but bearing in mind recent political events around social status in Irish society and this recurring theme around rugby and it’s support I think this is a genuine subject which deserves to be thrashed out.

    Been to a few matches down the years, and usually enjoy the banter/chanting/passion even fireworks for a tenner - from my limited viewing seams to be reallly one school with the offensive chanting ****e (like in the thread title) - if they clean it up, problem should be solved - Rugby should be for everyone, not just the privelleged, and that type of snob chanting should be rooted out by school - but keep the flares and the passion !


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 381 ✭✭ ToddDameron


    Sounds like the author of that article made it up. Intimidating supporters roaring "we pay fees." Yeah, sure.


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 49,446 CMod ✭✭✭✭ awec


    Not sure if people realise or not but the author of the article is not some rugby-hating inverse snob, in fact he used to work for the IRFU and without question knows his stuff.

    This "your father works for my father" and "we pay fees" stuff is actually cringeworthy.


  • Registered Users Posts: 783 ✭✭✭ parc


    What's the harm in this?

    A bunch of rapscallions and a bit of intra-schools verbal jousting.

    Great comradery amongst brothers. Letting off a bit of steam after a long hard day in the office. Harking back to the glory days, where life was as simple as bleeding your school's colours.

    No doubt the rivals in question shared a drink or two in the bar afterwards. No doubt some of their fathers do work for their fathers given the excellent network amongst Dublin's schools.

    Despite the rivalries on the pitch, which often manifests in the stands, Dublin schools have commensurate ethe. You can't argue with that.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,688 ✭✭✭ lalababa


    Ireland can beat anyone on their day. But their days are and can be few and far between, as we don't have the depth or the pedigree. When things get really competitive,and within a short time frame and also against teams we perceive as inferior, we are found lacking. We can do well, and have done in the six nations, and 2/3 tests in a row. Anything more than that we are stretched.
    Also that particular great team had peaked, played itself out, couldn't go to the well again, tactics found out, and Sexton & Murry not at their best.
    That's not to say those players can not come again after a bit of rest/run of losses.


  • Registered Users Posts: 767 ✭✭✭ eclipsechaser


    awec wrote: »
    Not sure if people realise or not but the author of the article is not some rugby-hating inverse snob, in fact he used to work for the IRFU and without question knows his stuff.

    This "your father works for my father" and "we pay fees" stuff is actually cringeworthy.

    I absolutely agree that there is a serious issue with the behaviour of some past (and current) pupils attending those matches. However OP linking it to Ireland's world cup performance or the recent election is straw-grasping of the highest order and deserves ridicule.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,862 ✭✭✭ Jordy Flaky Dinosaur


    lalababa wrote: »
    Ireland can beat anyone on their day. But their days are and can be few and far between, as we don't have the depth or the pedigree. When things get really competitive,and within a short time frame and also against teams we perceive as inferior, we are found lacking. We can do well, and have done in the six nations, and 2/3 tests in a row. Anything more than that we are stretched.
    Also that particular great team had peaked, played itself out, couldn't go to the well again, tactics found out, and Sexton & Murry not at their best.
    That's not to say those players can not come again after a bit of rest/run of losses.

    Few and far between? Jesus you’re some spoofer


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    saabsaab wrote: »
    'old school, garrison, “West Brit” sport.'



    Isn't that Soccer?


    Anyway Dev was a secret rugby player.

    No sorry it’s rugby


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    i mean this is untrue to the point where it’s so obviously untrue that it’s a waste of time refuting it.

    Ok so what is the national sport in SA, please enlighten me. What sport is played more widely in SA than rugby I would actually love to know?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    I'm curious as to what you think the election results have in relation to the popularity or potential lack of success of Irish rugby. Could you elaborate?

    If you need me to explain it it you it shows how out of touch you really are while burying your head in the sand looking at rugby stats.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    Ok so what is the national sport in SA, please enlighten me. What sport is played more widely in SA than rugby I would actually love to know?
    The most popular sport is soccer. Then cricket and then rugby.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭ Will Thundering Principal


    prawnsambo wrote: »
    The most popular sport is soccer. Then cricket and then rugby.

    Nonsense. https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-national-sport-of-South-Africa


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    If you need me to explain it it you it shows how out of touch you really are while burying your head in the sand looking at rugby stats.
    In other words you just made it up.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,308 ✭✭✭✭ prawnsambo


    Did you even read what you linked? Rugby is the most popular sport amongst white South Africans. The minority.


This discussion has been closed.
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