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Smart meter opt out

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Comments



  • hawthorne wrote: »
    Ever looked inside one of those meters? Full of electronic components- which need to be produced.

    Electronic components you say :eek:

    I opened my smart meter and this is what I found....

    hamster2.jpg




  • LOL!
    Make sure it does not run out of food!




  • My parents and sister got smart meters installed recently. Neither got anything for them to monitor their usage, is that not supposed to be the point of installing them?




  • My house got smart meter installed recently. Found it weird that we had to get an injection off the installer, and smell that weird stuff he had in the bottle, that made us all so sleepy, but we're definitely happy with the new meter.



    More seriously though, can I ask, My meter is beside my front door, as in, it's actually part of the door. On the left of the front door, there's a panel, with a window on the top half and a little hinged door on the bottom half (you open this to access the meter). Now that we have a smart meter, can we cover this over? (ie; get rid of the hinged door?). Or does it still need to be accessible? (looking at new front doors, and getting one with a door for the meter is proving difficult).




  • listermint wrote: »
    The network provider.

    This nonsense thread has to stop.

    How in the world do you think we are going to be able to manage smart networks and renewable energies without smart meters. There's a fierce amount of bellends that can't see their arse from their elbow.

    Go off and lookup FIT.

    The consumer is paying for the present upgrade and future upgrades.There is no gov/eu grant to cover the installations.


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  • I’m with Flogas. Do you good know if I can get one?




  • FFVII wrote: »
    https://www.ovoenergy.com/help/after-your-smart-meter-installation#will-my-smart-meter-last-me-for-life

    They are certified for 10 years...and then must be replaced. You're off to a bad start.

    'They'.. you mean UK smart meters?

    That document refers to a meter with a keypad which the customer can use to extract data so it is of no relevance to Irish consumers. The smart meters installed here have no physical interface, no keypad or buttons.

    But please keep trawling the internet, you can always find something to match your narrative.




  • coylemj wrote: »
    Wrong question. Instead, ask for the source of that nonsense claim. And the claim that only 3% will see a reduction in their bill.

    The post you're referring to was pure black propaganda with not one source quoted for a series of spurious 'facts'.

    What on earth are you smoking?




  • 2mm aluminium sheets do a better job and last longer

    Do you make nice hats from it




  • coylemj wrote: »
    'They'.. you mean UK smart meters?

    That document refers to a meter with a keypad which the customer can use to extract data so it is of no relevance to Irish consumers. The smart meters installed here have no physical interface, no keypad or buttons.

    But please keep trawling the internet, you can always find something to match your narrative.

    Every electronical component lasts only a limited time. One of the most common parts to fail after a while is a capacitor. Simply due to the way it is constructed.
    There is no way around it.
    And if you believe it or not- some models have even batteries installed to keep certain functions alive. And I have not seen a battery which could outlive an analogue meter.
    It is correct- the meters are certified for 10 years- but show signs of age already a bit earlier.
    Would you like to pay for energy you never used- but which might be clocking up on your meter? Of course it could be all in your favour- but that means the ESB is loosing out....and somebody has to pay again for the losses- which is most likely all customers.
    The ESB will replace all meters again in the future- but all customers will pay through their bills over time for that service.
    I see that it is completely useless to post any links here- since you will condemn them outright as not being relevant to this country or just being "a catch on the internet".
    Obviously you are not interested in a mature discussion of the subject.


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  • listermint wrote: »
    The network provider.

    That's fine then, once they don't come to me in 7/10 years or whenever and ask me to pay for a replacement smart meter. I didn't request this change and am quite happy with the regular meter that has been in situ for the last 25 years.




  • All,

    There has been a couple of reported posts. I ignored them as the reporters continued on with some back and forth afterward.

    Please use the report a post function and leave it at that. Please don't report the the post and continue to engage with the other poster afterwards




  • All

    Please stop reporting each others posts.

    I've deleted most of the threads now.

    Recognize your own part in escalating an issue and please stop being personal in your responses..




  • It currently costs, I think, over €200 to switch to a Day/Night meter, with a Smart Meter I'd imagine it'd be free.

    It's free to switch to a night rate tariff currently, not sure there has ever been a charge for the actual switch. Your standing charge does increase.




  • hawthorne wrote: »
    The smart meter is in theory a good idea.
    In reality it is a waste of resources and not environmental friendly at all.

    Tests done confirmed that the vast majority of consumers did not save a single penny. The most it was about 3%- which was offset with the long term charges of the installations.
    The meter itself has a limited lifespan. While an analogue meter easily works fine over 50 years, the smart meter needs to be replaced every 7 years or so. The smart reading won't be that smart at all after that time- in fact the reading is a lot of phantasy. Which costs you at lot.
    Ever looked inside one of those meters? Full of electronic components- which need to be produced. An analogue meter is a very simple thing easily made. What will happen with the meter when it gets replaced? Will it be recycled? Bet it will- like the over 80% of all EU produced electronic junk ends in Ghana or some other country. The damage the production causes are considerable as well.
    The job of the meter reader is gone- like so many other jobs simply vanish. We are told the jobs will be created somewhere else- but they won't. Look around you. It happens all over the place.
    I have no problem with OP if he wishes to opt out. It is a wise move.
    never heard such rubbish




  • Del2005 wrote: »
    My parents and sister got smart meters installed recently. Neither got anything for them to monitor their usage, is that not supposed to be the point of installing them?

    Its coming. The telecoms side is going live end of this month. Electric Ireland are starting a soft launch over the next few days with beta testers. it'll give the option of 24 hour tariffs or, night, day and Peak. half hour data will be made available to the user and the system should learn and display what devices were on to cause peaks. I guess they can learn the profile of electric showers, cookers etc easy enough. also there is an option for monthly billing




  • ted1 wrote: »
    Its coming. The telecoms side is going live end of this month. Electric Ireland are starting a soft launch over the next few days with beta testers. it'll give the option of 24 hour tariffs or, night, day and Peak. half hour data will be made available to the user and the system should learn and display what devices were on to cause peaks. I guess they can learn the profile of electric showers, cookers etc easy enough. also there is an option for monthly billing

    Thats good to hear. The last time I tried to get a smart meter they wouldnt allow day/night rate so I had to reject it.

    With a Solar PV Feed-in-tariff coming in July 2021 its important that the smart meters support the day/night tariff.




  • KCross wrote: »
    Thats good to hear. The last time I tried to get a smart meter they wouldnt allow day/night rate so I had to reject it.

    With a Solar PV Feed-in-tariff coming in July 2021 its important that the smart meters support the day/night tariff.

    Strange

    When the switch to digital meters first came in ,.they had the day/night built-in

    That's going back about 15 years or more if I recall




  • I have nothing against modern technology and will be getting one of these meters, I have a 50 year old Ferranti which has a rotating disc, very handy for calculating power, I know most people have no usage for such but the new meters I believe don't even display one decimal point of kwh, it should also have been relatively easy to display the power in watts.




  • Gestureapo wrote: »
    Strange

    When the switch to digital meters first came in ,.they had the day/night built-in

    That's going back about 15 years or more if I recall

    The new smart meters already supported day/night but I believe the back office systems to process the data were not yet setup for day/night. That was over a year ago.


    Looks like they have that sorted now (or at least close to having it sorted).


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  • John.G wrote: »
    I have nothing against modern technology and will be getting one of these meters, I have a 50 year old Ferranti which has a rotating disc, very handy for calculating power, I know most people have no usage for such but the new meters I believe don't even display one decimal point of kwh, it should also have been relatively easy to display the power in watts.

    Better off without the decimal place imo, causes confusion in relation to meter reading

    People sometimes get confused between display display and accuracy

    Just because you have a digital readout doesn't necessarily means it's accurate




  • Del2005 wrote: »
    My parents and sister got smart meters installed recently. Neither got anything for them to monitor their usage, is that not supposed to be the point of installing them?

    No, the point is really for the power companies (better control over those that cannot pay - a growing concern as fuel costs increase) and more data to monetise (as well as being a bit of a gravy train for the companies that get the contracts to build and install them).

    The rest is just dross being touted as beneficial to the (generally) non tech savvy consumer.

    For clarity - I am not anti-vaxx, I don't own a tinfoil hat, I don't believe the guberment want to put microchips on our brains etc. This is actually one of the dangers modern day conspiracy theories present - its very easy to dismiss anything as a conspiracy theory because there is so much noise out there, even when there are valid concerns - such as the storage and usage of consumer data or the awarding of huge contracts etc.




  • km991148 wrote: »
    No, the point is really for the power companies (better control over those that cannot pay - a growing concern as fuel costs increase) and more data to monetise (as well as being a bit of a gravy train for the companies that get the contracts to build and install them).

    The rest is just dross being touted as beneficial to the (generally) non tech savvy consumer.

    For clarity - I am not anti-vaxx, I don't own a tinfoil hat, I don't believe the guberment want to put microchips on our brains etc. This is actually one of the dangers modern day conspiracy theories present - its very easy to dismiss anything as a conspiracy theory because there is so much noise out there, even when there are valid concerns over the storage and usage of consumer data.

    Reality is moving into what was once conspiracy theory territory

    Slowly but it's definitely happening




  • Gestureapo wrote: »
    Reality is moving into what was once conspiracy theory territory

    Slowly but it's definitely happening

    Ha ha, post of the day, the twilight zone tune is in my head:D:D




  • CoBo55 wrote: »
    Ha ha, post of the day, the twilight zone tune is in my head:D:D

    Never would have thought it myself but there's definitely crossover now




  • Gestureapo wrote: »
    Never would have thought it myself but there's definitely crossover now

    Digging digging digging... Mind your sammiges...




  • km991148 wrote: »
    No, the point is really for the power companies (better control over those that cannot pay - a growing concern as fuel costs increase) and more data to monetise (as well as being a bit of a gravy train for the companies that get the contracts to build and install them).

    And we are paying €1b to deploy these smart meters... a billion, not a million! :eek:

    I like the idea of the smart meters and I dont buy into the conspiracy theory stuff on here, but the cost is eye watering for what it actually returns.




  • Gestureapo wrote: »
    Better off without the decimal place imo, causes confusion in relation to meter reading

    People sometimes get confused between display display and accuracy

    Just because you have a digital readout doesn't necessarily means it's accurate

    Can't see why it it should cause confusion as the meters will only be manually read for a very brief period.

    I am very disappointed though that the power isn't displayed, if it isn't accurate then the kwh will not be accurate as the kwh is the accumulation of the power in kw, just using a example from 30 years ago and some digital metering that we had, the scan time was relatively slow at 2 secs, so every 2 secs the measured kw way multiplied by a factor of 0.0005556 (2/3600) and accumulated, so if the power measurement was incorrect the energy measurement was too.

    There was very smart metering out well over half a century ago and these caused no confusion whatsoever in meter reading as in the example below only the first 4 digits were read and the "units" were then X 100 for billing purposes but one could still get a very accurate reading of the energy usage as it was displayed, why the big deal in not supplying a little more info to the consumer with these smart meters??.




  • John.G wrote: »
    Can't see why it it should cause confusion as the meters will only be manually read for a very brief period.

    I am very disappointed though that the power isn't displayed, if it isn't accurate then the kwh will not be accurate as the kwh is the accumulation of the power in kw, just using a example from 30 years ago and some digital metering that we had, the scan time was relatively slow at 2 secs, so every 2 secs the measured kw way multiplied by a factor of 0.0005556 (2/3600) and accumulated, so if the power measurement was incorrect the energy measurement was too.

    There was very smart metering out well over half a century ago and these caused no confusion whatsoever in meter reading as in the example below only the first 4 digits were read and the "units" were then X 100 for billing purposes but one could still get a very accurate reading of the energy usage as it was displayed, why the big deal in not supplying a little more info to the consumer with these smart meters??.

    What is the use of a decimal place on a meter readout?

    It adds to confusion on the old system too where customers take readings themselves


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  • km991148 wrote: »
    No, the point is really for the power companies (better control over those that cannot pay - a growing concern as fuel costs increase) and more data to monetise (as well as being a bit of a gravy train for the companies that get the contracts to build and install them).

    The rest is just dross being touted as beneficial to the (generally) non tech savvy consumer.

    Sometimes you have to look at the bigger picture. The principal reasons for rolling out smart meters is so that variable tariffs (based on time of day) can be applied to people who only have a single meter.

    The underlying motive is to flatten the demand curve, especially during the peak period in the late afternoon/early evening (5-7) when (in normal times) offices are still open, children are home from school and a lot of people are home from work. Charging peak rates during this period (when your smart meter shows 'T3') will be designed to discourage people from using the likes of dishwashers and washing machines until later in the day.

    Eliminating or reducing spikes in demand will result in reductions in the amount of power required in the grid, this will yield savings in power generation and reductions in CO2 emissions. And will require less new generation infrastructure. All of which will be a positive development.


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