Advertisement
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards
Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Is beer in Ireland bad?

13

Comments



  • ex barman of 10 years so can tell if something is wrong with lines,also all people i asked had eaten,not drinking heavy...i was tap for long time gave it up cos of stomoch and went to cans of bud.still same problem and with other beers like molsen etc,,full belly on me too before i hit the beer..and im 34 only last two years its happening age isnt the problem me thinks




  • mcdaids69 wrote: »
    ex barman of 10 years so can tell if something is wrong with lines,also all people i asked had eaten,not drinking heavy...i was tap for long time gave it up cos of stomoch and went to cans of bud.still same problem and with other beers like molsen etc,,full belly on me too before i hit the beer..and im 34 only last two years its happening age isnt the problem me thinks

    I never drink beer after a meal.
    I love a few pints and then have dinner.
    Once I've eaten I'll only have a drop of brandy or wine.
    Never had a stomach problem in my life.

    Maybe it's the grub before the pints that's bothering you, as you say at 34 it's hardly the age.




  • I switched to wine... combination of gassy lagers or heavy beers and a multi-course dinner (i.e. more than just a burger) wasn't working for me anymore.
    Pizza with a Peroni is grand.




  • mcdaids69 wrote: »
    ex barman of 10 years so can tell if something is wrong with lines,also all people i asked had eaten,not drinking heavy...i was tap for long time gave it up cos of stomoch and went to cans of bud.still same problem and with other beers like molsen etc,,full belly on me too before i hit the beer..and im 34 only last two years its happening age isnt the problem me thinks


    I see that Guinness (probably some others too) stopped using isinglass as a fining agent sometime in 2018 and switched to some other agent. This was to make it Vegan friendly.
    I wonder what agent they using now?
    Anyone from Guinness care to enlighten us?




  • Anyone?


  • Advertisement


  • https://www.veganfriendly.org.uk/is-it-vegan/beer/

    This link lists the beers that are Vegan including Guinness Stout and Corona.




  • I wonder what fining agent they using now?
    Anyone from Guinness care to enlighten us?




  • Can anyone tell me what fining agent is used by Irish brewers?




  • Had a look around on the web saw that Guinness haven't said what new filtering method they use now. Maybe a new process.




  • Has Guinness changed its make-up recently,5-6 pints i use to be grand the next day,but lately ive being dying after 3-4 pints

    In 2015 they reworked it to remove isinglass.

    Edit - saabsaab on it already

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.



  • Advertisement


  • A difference I found drinking in Holland and Germany is that more often than not the glasses are not pint glasses. Usually half pints are slightly larger.

    So you are drinking a lot less.




  • A difference I found drinking in Holland and Germany is that more often than not the glasses are not pint glasses. Usually half pints are slightly larger.

    So you are drinking a lot less.

    That’s a good difference, in my opinion and would help the alcohol problem in this country.

    Instead of big-bellied topers opening their throats and gulling back pints in one or two chuggs, a more civilized way of drinking might ensue.

    No more fifteen pinters pissing like dray horses once the seal is broken.

    Flooding the conveniences.




  • Does anyone know what organization/agency regulate beer standards in Ireland?




  • saabsaab wrote: »
    Does anyone know what organization/agency regulate beer standards in Ireland?

    Don't weights and measures look after quantities, I would have thought quality would be a food thing?

    This is the nature of war. By protecting others, you save yourself. If you only think of yourself, you'll only destroy yourself.





  • Hard to know who regulates it here. Would beer be a food?




  • Feisar wrote: »
    Don't weights and measures look after quantities, I would have thought quality would be a food thing?

    Thanks for that. Looks like you are correct on both counts.

    https://www.fsai.ie/search-results.html?searchString=beer

    https://www.nsai.ie/legal-metrology/enforcement-information/




  • A difference I found drinking in Holland and Germany is that more often than not the glasses are not pint glasses. Usually half pints are slightly larger.

    So you are drinking a lot less.

    What? :D

    No you’re not, you’re just drinking each glass quicker. Would help not have it go warm though.




  • What? :D

    No you’re not, you’re just drinking each glass quicker. Would help not have it go warm though.

    See post 73 dude.




  • See post 73 dude.

    I don’t use the desktop site maaaan.




  • Its just you baby..


  • Advertisement


  • elperello wrote: »




    Not really what I was asking but thanks. They seem to be about regulating what is considered safe to ingest or not, not the quality of the drink!


    I think that there is an association controlled by brewers but is not state controlled or independent.




  • saabsaab wrote: »
    Not really what I was asking but thanks. They seem to be about regulating what is considered safe to ingest or not, not the quality of the drink!


    I think that there is an association controlled by brewers but is not state controlled or in dependent.

    Is there even outside control over it at all? Surely a brewery would have its own QC department and that would be it so long as they meet regulations. Most Irish beers are excellent anyway.




  • Is there even outside control over it at all? Surely a brewery would have its own QC department and that would be it so long as they meet regulations. Most Irish beers are excellent anyway.

    Sounds about right.

    The FSAI say it's ok to drink, the HSE say the pub is hygienic, the NSAI say the pint glass contains a pint.

    After that you are good to, find one you like and sup away.




  • Hi,

    There's absolutely no doubt in my mind, that your better of serving a decent craft beer.

    Sure, craft beer is a bit more expensive, but it's worth it, IMHO.

    There are dozens of craft beers, so the trick is to try and find a few that you like, then see where you can get them at best price.

    Both Aldi and Lidl do a selection of craft beers, some of which aren't half bad, and are a tad easier on the wallet.

    Tesco, O'Briens etc often do promotions, where they do certain beers at 4 or 5 for a tenner.

    Thanks,

    G.





  • Why is craft beer dearer when the excise charged is less?




  • Im not Irish my doesn't matter what it tastes like i want to taste with my 5 friends i will show you Guinness,

    This could work?

    Im getting likes for my 5 friends




  • elperello wrote: »
    Sounds about right.

    The FSAI say it's ok to drink, the HSE say the pub is hygienic, the NSAI say the pint glass contains a pint.

    After that you are good to, find one you like and sup away.


    That's what I've done for years but in the last year or two it seems to be causing stomach upset after only a few? Not just me see start of the post..




  • Esel wrote: »
    Why is craft beer dearer when the excise charged is less?

    Because they like to rip off poor Pat.




  • Esel wrote: »
    Why is craft beer dearer when the excise charged is less?

    More expensive to make mainly as it’s smaller quantities a lot of the time. That’s not to say that people don’t make hay with pricing in this country anyway. It’s our new heritage.


  • Advertisement


  • More expensive to make mainly as it’s smaller quantities a lot of the time.
    This. The excise reduction is available for breweries producing less than 40,000 hectolitres per year. Most of these microbreweries produce more than one brew, so annual production for each brew is some fraction of 40,000 hl. The excise reduction is given precisely in recognition of the fact that brewing in small batches is relatively inefficient and, therefore, relatively expensive; the idea is to facilitate the introduction of new beers into the market; it's intended to assist the brewer and only indirectly the drinker (in the sense that drinkers benefit from a wider range of choices, and from the ability of new beers to enter the market). The excise reduction may not fully offset the extra costs involved in brewing in small batches in a microbrewery.


Advertisement